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Start The New Year Right! 

Spice up your library of home movie films with several new animated cartoons — prints of some of the best 
subjects produced by Walt Disney, Hugh Harmon and Walter Lantz. They're available now for your 
s / home projector in both 8mm. and 16mm. at attractive prices. 

\ 



Donald Puck . . . 

The Donald Duck series of cartoons is undoubtedly the leader of all wholesome screen 
entertainment. Donald is a riot of laughs in every one of these new films: 

Donald's Ice Capers 1559- A Donald Gets Ducked 1 560- A 

Donald's Fast Finish 1 562- A Donald's Spanish 

_ . _ . Serenade 1561 -A 

Donald Down Mexico 

Way 1563-A Donald Duck's Outing 1551 -A 

100 Ft. - 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. - 8mm 1.50 




Bosko . . . 



Sometimes mischievous, sometimes the hero of fantasy, ofttimes the victim of his 
own pranks, litt'e colored Bosko, is one of the most delightful characters ever to 
emerge from the cartoon field of entertainment. These are the first 8mm. and 16mm. 
Bosko films to be made available: 

Bosko's Circus Fleas 1801 A Bosko's Photo Finish 1802- A 

Bosko's Bad Wolf 1803-A Bosko's Bear Escape 1804-A 

Bosko's Spooks 1805-A Bosko's Magic Carpet 1808- A 

100 Ft. - 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. - 8mm. 1.50 





Oswald Rabbit... 

Walter Lantz's lovable cartoon character, Oswald Rabbit, is at his best in this 8mm. 
and 16mm. series of animated cartoons that will stir laughs in young and old alike: 

The Radio Bug 18-A Oswald The Bug Charmer. ...1 9-A 

Buzzing Around 20-A The Magic Wand 21 -A 

Oswald's Goofy Gopher 22-A Remote Control 23-A 

100 Ft. - 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. - 8mm 1.50 



HOLLYWOOD 

FILM ENTERPRISES, 

INC. 

llywood, California • 6060 Sunset Boulevard 



FREE! — LATEST CATALOGS . . . 

Listing all newest animated cartoons and other subjects available 
from Hollywood Film Enterprises. Write for your copy today! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 
6060 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood, Calif. 

Gentlemen: Please send me your latest catalogs of films for 
8mm. and 14mm. home projectors. 

NAME. _ _ 

ADDRESS _ 

STATE 



ADVISORY EDITORS 



DR. A. K. BAUMGARDNER 

Peoria Cinema Club 

(PETER BEZEK 

Chicago Cinema Club 

S. JAMES BIALSON 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Louis 

E. MOSS BROWN 

Dallas Cinema Club 

(WALTER BRACKEN 

The 8-16 Movie Club, Philadelphia, Pa. 

W. EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographers 

RUSSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema Club 

CYRIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Ctub 

(ARTHUR E. GIBBS 

Portland Cine Club 

[RAY A. HOOK 

Seattle 8mm Club 

ALFRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Club 

J. E. NESTELL 

Cinemen Club 

NARCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

GILBERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 

A. THEO. ROTH 

Sherman Clay Movie Club 

C. O. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm Movie Club 

J. PAUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

REED E. SNYDER 

Des Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 

M. F. SISSEL 

Austin Movie Club 

CURTIS O. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 




. />ome 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Vat. Off. 



Entered as Second-Class Matter, May h, 1938, at 
the Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 

Act of March 3, 1879. 
Subscription rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
copies 25c. Adverising rates on application. 



Copyright 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen 
Publications, Hollywood, Calif. No part of magazine 
may be reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR JANUARY, 1943 

INFORMATION PLEASE 4 

THE READER SPEAKS 6 

the movie amateur's outlook for 1 943 — By Curtis Randall ... 9 

they plan 'em, shoot 'em like professionals! — By Jack Irwin IO 

"cine whimsey" an amateur sound film — By }. H. Schoen n 

airbrushed designs for titles — By Russell Thorpe 12 

scenario for indoor filmers — By Sydney Landin 13 

a war-time editing board for gadgeteers — By Al Morton 14 

COLOR FILMING WITH BLUE PHOTOFLOODS 

— By Ray G. McLaughlin 1 6 

SUCCESSFUL TITLES DEPEND UPON CAREFUL EXPOSURE 

— By George W. Cushman 17 

THE EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP I 8 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW 20 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS By J. H. ScljOen 2 2 

title troubles — By George W. Cushman 29 

home movie titles — By Edmund Turner 29 



JANUARY 



CHAS. J. Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. |. Ver HALEN, JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
Everett Cellert, 62 West 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 




NUMBER 1 
VOLUME X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. CAVIN 

EDITOR 



CEORGE W. CUSHMAN 
J. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHtt 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S MACAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 



PAGE 4 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



THE 
MOST 

FOR 

YOUR 
MOVIE 

MONEY! 

That's the aim of every camera user — and 
that's what you have with KIN-O-LUX 
MOVIE FILM. For the speed and latitude 
to "get'' the picture and the projection 
quality to "give" finer results provide a 
more complete enjoyment in motion pic- 
ture making — at prices lower than any 
other film of comparable quality. 

KINOLUX 

MOVIE FILMS 



KIN-O-LUX GOLD SEAL 
Indoor Only 

(No Outdoor Ratings) 
Weston 100; 
Scheiner »• 



KIN-O-LUX No. 2 
Outdoor 

Weston 12; 
Scheiner 20' 




KIN-O-LUX No. 3 
Indoor-Outdoor 

Weston 50; Tung .40 
Scheiner 26°; 
Tung .24 



KIN-O-LUX No. I 
Outdoor 

Weston 8; 
Scheiner 18' 



Go to your dealer today. Ask for KIN-O- 
LUX FILMS in the size and footage you 
require. They are still available. If your 
dealer cannot supply you (the demand 
grows greater every day) go to another 
nearby dealer or write directly to us. 

KIN-O-LUX, Inc. 

Dept. H-1- l05W.40St. • NEW YORK CITY 



information please 



Emulsion Speed (J. R. Arndt, Lit- 
tleton, Colo.) 

Q. How much faster is an emulsion 
speed of Weston 24 than one of Wes- 
ton 12? 

A. All Weston values can be rela- 
tively compared. An emulsion rated 
Weston 24 is twice as fast as one rated 
Weston 12. And an emulsion rated 16 
requires twice as much exposure as an 
emulsion rated 32. 

Fast Film (Don DeLaun, Ithaca, N.Y.) 

Q. / have a roll of Stiper XX pan film 
in my camera. Part of it has been ex- 
posed on a number of interior shots. 1 
wish to expose the rest out of doors but 
f.nd I cannot stop down my lens enough 
— the film's too fast. What can J do 
about this? 

A. The professionals, faced with this 
problem, would place a neutral density 
filter over the camera lens to compen- 
sate for the high film speed. You can 
do the same thing, or use any one of the 
heavy filters — orange, red or green — 
if you do not mind the over-correction 
that will result. If your outdoor expos- 
ure with super-speed film called for an 
opening of f '22 for example (which 
your lens does not provide) by using a 
2 3 -A red filter before the lens you can 
shoot this film at f/16. 

Auxiliary Lenses (J. H. Hopper, Bel- 
ton, S. C.) 

Q. Why is it necessary to use an aux- 
iliary lens when working with a titler; 
also, how can I distinguish one focal 
length auxiliary lens from another? 
When using a camera with lens in fo- 
cusing mount and with lens set at in- 
finity, is it necessary to use an auxiliary 
lens to shoot titles at distances from 1 2" 
to 24"? 

A. The first part of your question is 
answered in Dr. A. K. Baumgardner's 
letter which appeared in the December 
1942 issue. Here's the specific para- 
graph which pertains to your question: 

". . . we know that we must set the 
camera lens for infinity (in shooting 
titles with auxiliary lenses — Ed.) which, 
if used alone, will focus parallel rays of 
light at its own focal length. When we 
photograph a title at short range, we 
do not have parallel rays of light and 
therefore place an auxiliary in front of 
the camera lens which will render them 
parallel before entering the lens system 
in order to retain the same focal length." 

In short, the auxiliary lens converts 
the camera lens to one of short focus. 
! If you purchase auxiliary lenses from 



• Readers: This department is for your 
benefit. Send in your problems and our 
technical board of professional cameramen 
will answer your question in these col- 
umns. If an answer by mail is desired, 
enclose addressed stamped envelope. 



an optical supply house, or use lenses 
from reading spectacles on sale at the 
average dime store, you will find both 
the diopter rating and focal lentgh of 
the lens indicated on a tiny label ce- 
mented to the lens. Usually figures ap- 
pear as: 4/10 which would indicate 
a lens of 4 diopters or 10-inch focusing 
distance. Top figure always indicates 
diopters, lower figures the focusing dis- 
tance. 

The answer to your last question is 
yes. An auxiliary lens must always be 
used when filming titles at a distance 
less than that provided by the minimum 
focusing distance of the camera lens. 
Some camera lenses will focus down to 
2 ieet. With such lenses, title cards 
may be photographed at a distance of 
24" without use of an auxiliary lens. 

Splice Curl (D. Van Heusen, Allen- 
town, Pa.) 

Q. All the splices 1 made in my last 
reel of film are curled or warped, mak- 
ing projection of the film difficult. 

What caused this? I used film 

cement. 

A. Old, deteriorated film cement 
probably caused the trouble. Get a fresh 
bottle of cement, any brand, and re- 
splice your film. You'll note at once the 
difference fresh cement makes. 

Increasing Speed (John Halcross, 
New Haven, Conn.) 

Q. / have been told its possible to 
\tep up speed of Kodachrome film for 
use in filming night exteriors, etc. How 
is this done? How much is speed im- 
proved? 

A. Kodachrome film may be hyper- 
sensitized by the mercury process, i. e., 
the film placed for a period of 24 hours 
in a light- and air-tight jar preferably 
of china or glass in the bottom of which 
is placed a small quantity of mercury. 
(See pg. 130, March 1941 Homl Mov- 
itss). Vapor from mercury permeates 
film, increasing its sensitivity. 

Hypersensitizing gives same result 
with either regular or type "A" Koda- 
chrome; increases speed about one full 
stop; and gives same results whether 

• Continued on Page 2! 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 5 



herbs m S^^L^ 




"YANKS 
INVADE AFRICA! 



11 



Now! Own for surprisingly little the actual pic- 
tures of the American invasion of Africa! Thrill 
yourself, your family and your friends with scenes 
of an action that will live forever! See the mass- 
ing of the greatest invasion armada the world has 
ever known! Hold your breath as the Allied ships 
sail through deadly waters to their glorious des- 
tiny! See our forces actually landing! See them 
cheered by French and natives! Here is a great 
historic picture every projector owner will be 
proud to own! Show it on your screen now! 



VICTORY 
OVER ROMMEL! 



World history is enacted before your very eyes in 
this smashing film record! Here are pictures that 
show on your own screen the first great Axis de- 
feat! Rommel battered from the gates of Suez! His 
shattered forces in reeling, beaten flight! See 
burning trucks! Flaming enemy planes! Blasted 
tanks! Desert-sea-air war in all its fury! These 
are scenes you'll want to see again and again— 
that you'll want to show at home, at your club, 
at patriotic gatherings! No film collector should 
miss it! Own both of these great historic chroni- 
cles—all in one film— now! 

All Castle 16 mm. Films are Vap-O-Rated. 
All Castle 8 mm. Films are also treated. 



START YOUR PERMANENT RECORD 
OF LIVING HISTORY NOW! 




FREE! 



New 32-page 1943 
Castle Films' Cata- 
logue describes over 
100 great movies. Check below for your copy! 



I ORDER FORM — 

I 



J 



Please send Castle Films' "Yanks Invade Africa" 
and "Victory Over Rommel" (both in one film) 
in the size and length checked. 




RCA BLDG. 
NEW YORK 



FIELD BLDG. 
CHICAGO 



RUSS BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



8 mm. 50 ft. . $1.75 □ 

8 mm. 180 ft. . $5.50 □ 

16 mm. 100 ft. . $2.75 □ 

16 mm. 360 ft. . $8.75 □ 

{Also available in 16 mm. 
Sound on Film-$17.50) . . □ 

Remittance enclosed . . . □ 

ShipC.O.D □ 



Name- 



Address- 



City- 



State H M - 

Send Castle Films' FREE Catalogue □ 

Copr. 1942, Castle Films. Inc. 



PAGE 6 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



8mm Camera Owners! 




When You Want ALL 
The Picture . . . Use the 

CINE-EXTENAR 

WIDE-ANGLE LENS 

You'll get the full scene without hav- 
ing to move the camera back. Just fit 
the Cine-Extenar right over your regu- 
lar lens — and shoot. 

The Cine-Extenar doubles field of view. 
Does not affect exposure, focus or defini- 
tion. It transforms your regular 8mm. 
lens into a wide angle lens of equal 
speed — ideal for indoor fast lens shots. 



$2750 



Write for illustrated folder giiing 
wake and description of your present 
8mm. lens. 

Mail Orders Filled 




World's Largest Camera Store 
Built on Square Dealing 
32nd St. near 6th Ave., N. Y. 



The Reader 



EMMET KsSiEE CASES 

For All Popular Movie Cameras 




Eveready REVERE Standard 8 

Popular with Movie fans. Gives M g m g\ 
COMPLETE camera protection. Top So 50 
Grain Cowhide leather «KW»«*W 

Other EMMET Eveready Cases 
For Popular Model Movie Cameras 

BOLEX SADDLE LEATHER CASE — Holds camera with 
viewfinder mounted on side or top. Space for Exposure 
Meter, extra lenses, 3 — 100 ft, rls. film and accessories. 

Has carrjinK handle and shoulder strap, each $35.00 

BELL & HOWELL 8MM. case. No. 83<S. each 7.00 

KEYSTONE >fodel K-8 case. No. 855. each 5.50 

KODAK CINE 8, models 20-25 cases. No. 814. ea. 7.50 

KODAK CINE 8, model 60 case. No. 850, each 7.50 

KODAK CINE 8. model 90 case. No. 1018. each. 7.75 

PERFEX CINE 8, case. No. 998. each 7.50 

AT YOUR DEALERS OR WRITE 

FRANK A. EMMET CO. 

2837 W. PICO BLVD. LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 




Hyperfocal Distance 

Sirs: In the July issue there is an ar- 
ticle titled "Controlling Focus For Bet- 
ter Photography" by William Bornmann 
which is very good. We ought to have 
more like it. But this article seems a lit- 
tle too technical to me, especially re- 
garding the tables of hyperfocal dis- 
tances and depth of field. In connection 
with the tables, article states: "Camera 
will be in focus from Yz the hyperfocal 
distance to infinity for various stops." 
However, the author did not explain if 
the tables were for a fixed focus or a 
focusing lens. Please have Mr. Born- 
mann explain this. — O. W . Prior, Ever- 
ett, Washington. 

William Bornmann' s reply follows. — 
Ed: 

Dear Mr. Prior: The table of hyper- 
focal distances and table of depth of 
field referred to are both for focusing 
lenses. The hyper-focal table shows the 
maximum range of focus for any given 
f/ stop. The fixed focus lenses of cine 
cameras are pre-set at the factory at 
the hyperfocal distance of the largest 
opening. Thus if a fixed focus lens is 
rated f/3.5, hyperfocal setting is based 
upon this opening, set for an average 
focusing distance of about 12 feet. Thus 
everything from approximately 6 feet 
( ]/z the hyperfocal distance) to infinity 
would be in sharp focus. — Wm. J. Born- 
mann. 

Single Frame Release 

What reader can help this cinebug re- 
vamp his camera} 

Sirs: Would like to contact a movie 
amateur who has successfully installed 
a single frame release and/or a back- 
wind device in a model 20 or 25 Cine 
Kodak. Wish to build similar gadgets 
lor my own camera. — Harold Georgens, 
3622 205th St., Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Fault Remedied 

Funny how cinebugs often solve 
problems that baffle the factory experts. 
Take this reader for instance: 

Sirs: In last August's issue, James 
Machamer, Houston, Texas, related in 
"Information Please" how he was hav- 
ing trouble with his camera producing 
an out-of-focus effect on one side of the 
film. He thought it was lens trouble and 
you suggested fault might lie in channel 
of film gate. I, too, have had the same 



SPEAKS 



trouble with my 8mm. camera. I sent it 
to the factory twice but they told me 
they checked camera carefully and 
could find nothing wrong. Finally I de- 
cided to analyze and correct the trouble 
myself at risk of injuring my camera. 
I removed the gate and bent the pressure 
spring so as to effect greater tension on 
the film. Since then, I have had no fur- 
ther trouble with out-of-focus film. — 
Paid McDonald, Chicago, 111. 

Screen Tests 

Sure this isn't a plug for Janet, Joe? 

Sirs: Recalling article on 16mm. 
screen tests in the December issue, 
thought you and readers might be in- 
terested in the following paragraph 
from movie column of L. A. Daily 
News: 

"You've not heard of Janet Hovey, 
probably, but Fritz Lang says its only 
a matter of time. She's the first player 
signed for his permanent picture stock 
company. From San Francisco, Miss 
Hovey read of Lang's search for talent. 
She sent him a home-made 16mm. test 
of herself and that brought on the con- 
tract plus a small part in "Uncon- 
quered." Fritz Lang is a Hollywood 
producer-director. — Joe Millare, Glen- 
dale, Calif. 

Good Idea 

We like this suggestion, hope other 
amateurs will likewise offer their serv- 
ices: 

Gentlemen: Thousands of movie am- 
ateurs are away from their homes and 
many have left both camera and pro- 
jector at home. I'm for sponsoring a 
• Continued on Page 2S 



RECOGNITION 

In addition to the Lloyd Bacon 
Trophy which he won for his superb 
16mm. Kodachrome film, "Warriors 
of Another World," in HOME MOV- 
IES' 1942 Contest, Dr. Richard L. 
Cassell, has received several offers 
to market prints of his film. 

Because of the unusual depth of 
focus obtained by Or. Cassell and 
the general over-all excellence of his 
photography, the film has great pos- 
sibilities as an educational and sci- 
entific document. Top bidders for 
reproduction and distribution rights 
are firms prominent in educational 
films field. 




77* 



"Witt, My 




PROJECTOR 

9 Show Manuel 

TO CHILDREN 
OF WAR 
WORKERS" 



A Patriotic 
Revere Owner 



1 1 1 I i l I I I 4 l I I I I 1 M t I I I II I ( I i I t I I I 1111/ t M 7T7 



REVERE 
Precision-Built 

AIRCRAFT 
INSTRUMENTS 

war supplies are being de- 
red to our Army, Navy and 
-ines in steadily growing 
jme. The skilled craftsmen 
) used to make Revere 
m. Cameras and Projectors 
now concentrating one 
ldred per cent on war pro- 
tion. ... So if you are a 
unate Revere owner we 
gest that you take care of 
r camera and projector and 

you to share your pleasure 
'our equipment with others. 



* WAR SAVINGS * 

* BONDS and * 
* STAMPS * 

4* jf. * 




the authorities who are in charge of 
child-care projects. 

Showing movies to children of war work- 
ers is only one of many ways of sharing 
your pleasure in your movie equipment. 
Write and tell us how you are using your 
camera and projector in Civilian Defense, 
Scrap Salvage, Red Cross work or some 
other important service for your country. 
Revere Camera Company, 320 E. 21st 
St., Chicago, 111. 




THE family home-movie projector is 
now serving a new war-time role. 
In play schools, day nurseries and homes, 
it is bringing wholesome entertainment 
to boys and girls whose mothers work in 
war plants. 

Owners of home-movie projectors, more 
and more, are volunteering their time and 
their equipment for this patriotic service. 
From their own collections and from the 
film libraries of camera stores they are 
showing animated cartoons and comics, 
nature study pictures and other interest- 
ing and informative juvenile subjects. 

Owners of Revere Projectors will find 
many 8mm. films in black-and-white or 
beautiful natural colors that are suitable 
for young audiences. Ask your dealer for 
his latest list! You will find it surprising- 
ly easy to plan programs that win the ap- 
proval not only of the youngsters but of 



1 " 1 " " ' 1 1 M ' 1 1 1 1 " I 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 'TT 



f the \ 





HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 8 



GUARDING AMERICA'S OUTPOSTS 





Yet, Almost Every Night They See 




floy U.S. War Bond* 
and Stamps 



IT'S twilight on the Caribbean . . . the 
day patrol is ended . . . "Chow" is over 
. . . and the boys are eagerly awaiting the 
evening movie show. 

"It's a real tonic to see movies after a 
hard day's work." writes a sailor on a sea- 
plane tender from somewhere on the sub- 
marine patrol, "and we see them prac- 
tically every night we're at anchor." 

From the Aleutians to the Solomons, 
from the Caribbean to Iceland — our sailors, 
marines, airmen and soldiers are enter- 
tained, their spirits buoyed up, their morale 
maintained with frequent 16mm. showings 
of the latest Hollywood releases. The gov- 
ernment considers these movies so vital to 
the war effort that the films are given the 
right of way on transport planes! 

In addition, 16mm. motion pictures are 
widely used as aid to training in all branches 



of the service — and as such have done a 
great job to speed up learning and increase 
the effectiveness of military teaching. 

In this connection — thousands of Ampro 
precision projectors are serving for both 
training and entertainment in the U. S. 
armed forces — and many more are on the 
way. Ampro is engaged 100% in the produc- 
tion of precision war equipment. 

Ampro engineering skill is being continu- 
ously utilized to provide our government 
with the most efficient projectors possible. 
All that this experience teaches — plus the 
greatly accelerated Ampro developmental 
work — will be available for civilian users of 
Ampro projectors when the war is over. In 
the meantime, you can plan for the future 
by keeping up with the latest developments 
in 16mm. projectors. Write today for the 
latest Ampro catalog. 



THE AMPRO CORPORATION, 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, III. 

* AMPRO * 

PRECISION CINE EQUIPMENT 





HOME PI IKS 

Published in Hollywood 
JIM AIM 1943 



w, 



HAT does 1943 hold for the 
movie amateur? Will movie making be 
restricted further by rationing and pri- 
orities? Will it be possibla still to buy 
equipment and film? These and many 
other questions are troubling the minds 
of the nation's cinefilmers as we enter 
upon a new year. Surprisingly the pic- 
ture is not anywhere near so bad as 
some pessimists would paint it. 

The photographic industry has been 
hit the same as every other business. Yet 
right up to this writing, few movie am- 
ateurs have any reason to complain. 
Any noticeable lessening in filming ac- 
tivity has been due chiefly to stowing 
away of cameras for the duration by 
men entering the service. Naturally this 
has had its effect on club activities, too. 
But on the whole, most clubs are carry- 
ing on normally, slanting their pro- 
grams toward educational sessions and 
screening of films, where production ac- 
tivities must be curtailed. 

Photography has been geared to our 
prosecution of this war which means 
that not only are our fighting forces 
demanding tremendous quantities of 
photographic equipment and supplies, 
but defense industries are using photog- 
raphy on a scale never dreamed of be- 
fore. Training films, V-mail and much 
of the field operations of the Signal 
Corps photographic division require tre- 
mendous amounts of 16mm. film. In- 
dustry is turning more and more to 
1 6mm. training and educational films to 
prepare green hands to man the imple- 
ments of war production. Hundreds of 
1 6mm. reduction prints of each new 
major Hollywood production are now 
being regularly turned out for exhibi- 
tion to armed forces overseas. Thus the 
greatest amount of 16mm. safety film 
in the history of the business is being 
consumed every day for purposes other 
than amateur movie making. 

In spite of this, the amateur's sup- 
ply of cine film has been only slightly 
affected. On December 15 th the War 




constitute a large 



movie amateur £ 
tlook lor 1943 



on 



By CURTIS RANDALL 



Production Board announced that effec- 
tive that date, the amateur's supply of 
film would be cut 50 per cent. It must 
be admitted that this is a very reason- 
able restriction. It means that the man 
accustomed to buying six or a dozen 
rolls of Kodachrome at a time must now 
be content with one or two, so a broth- 
er filmer can get film also. Considering 
the lessened demand for film due to 
the number of inactive filmers now in 
service, the average amateur still will be 
able to purchase his reasonable require- 
ments. Summed up, it means little or no 
effect will be felt by this, the first, re- 
striction on film. 

Equipment? As this is being written, 
at the height of the Christmas shopping 
period, most camera stores seem well 
stocked with popular makes of cine 
cameras and projectors with new buy- 
ers plentiful. Manufacture of all 8mm. 
?nd 1 6mm. cine cameras and projectors 
has ceased for the duration and when 
present stocks are sold, there will be no 
more until the factories again turn to 
civilian production. For sometime to 
come, therefore, the average movie am- 
ateur will be able to deal in the new 
equipment market — that is, of course, 
if its not a 16mm. sound projector he 



wants. Due to government needs, these 
are no longer available. 

As to equipment and accessories, 
there are still ample splicers, editing 
boards, film rewinds, reels, humidor 
cans, screens, titlers, etc., on dealer's 
shelves. Nor is the home film processor 
restricted. Chemicals are as readily 
available as before. 

Only those wishing to film indoors 
who do not already have photofloods 
and reflectors are to remain disappoint- 
ed. Photofloods were put under priori- 
ties by a government limitation order 
on October 24th and it takes a priority 
rating of AA-5 or better to buy them — 
which eliminates the amateur entirely. 
So if you've a supply of photofloods, 
treat them kindly. Don't burn them 
longer than necessary and store them 
where jarring or heavy vibration will 
not damage the filament. 

As substitutes for photofloods one 
can still buy projection lamps, spotlight 
bulbs and some high powered mazda 
lamps such as used in the studios, but 
these usually require alteration of the 
reflector in some way to accommodate 
them either because of size or type of 
base. 

• Continued on Page 24 



9 



PACE 10 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



vltey plan 'em, &koot 
'em like professional*! 



J\EARNY, New Jersey, is no 
small town. It is the site of the world- 
iamous Pulaski Skyway of the Lincoln 
Highway. It boasts a number of import- 
ant industrials — DuPont plastics, West- 
ern Electric cables, Congoleum-Nairn 
floor coverings to name a few. No less 
important to many of its citizens is 
Continental Motion Pictures, a Kearny 
amateur group that has been success- 
fully producing non-theatrical motion 
pictures for six years. 

Continental Motion Pictures, as an 
organization, differs from the average 
amateur cine club in that it was organ- 
ized for the express purpose of regular- 
ly producing full scale motion picture 
dramas, comedies and documentary 
films in 8mm. and 16mm. It began sev- 
eral years ago when John McNaught, 
one of its directors, was presented with 
an inexpensive movie camera that 
cranked by hand. By coincidence, a 
friend also came into ownership of a 
cine camera about the same time. To- 



W I N 



gether, they embarked on a plan of seri- 
ous movie production. They wanted to 
make movies — not random shots of 
everything under the sun, but movies 
that tell a story. Like those made in 
Hollywood. 

Since then, the organization has 
grown to an impressive membership 
of serious-minded cinebugs, most of 
whom have not yet reached the age of 
twenty. It has become the nucleus of 
a nation wide organization of amateur 
movie makers — the Amateur Movie Pro- 
ducers of America. It has produced 
more than sixteen complete productions. 
It has been given wide publicity in such 
national publications as PIC, American 
Magazine, Design; also in newspapers 
from coast to coast. Continental Motion 
Pictures and its producing staff have 
been featured in such popular radio pro- 
grams as Dave Elman's Hobby Lobby, 
Camera Club of The Air, and the Bright 
Idea Club. Pathe News featured them in 
a newsreel. 



roue 



|| ?ubl. Co. 




The pool of members' equipment 
available to this group is enormous. 
There are no less than half dozen 16mm. 
cameras, an equal number of tripods, a 
score of clamp-on reflectors, six Kodak 
twinflectors mounted on collapsible 
metal stands, four projectors, and, of 
course, ample exposure meters, and oth- 
er incidentals. 

The organization, very business-like, 
is divided into departments: photo- 
graphic, make-up, script-writing, edit- 
ing, titling, etc., similar to a Hollywood 
production unit. There's even a location 
department in charge of a portable com- 
missary with electric stoves and culinary 
equipment that boasts ability to feed 
a group of 20 or more in the field. 

Biggest incentive, perhaps, for this 
organization is fact they have a definite 
outlet for their films. Pictures are con- 
sistently screened in local schools, audi- 
toriums, and civic clubs and the money 
received from showings is re-invested in 
new equipment and film. 

"Hansel and Gretel" and "Little Red 
Riding Hood" have proven two of Con- 
tinental's most popular photoplays. In 
fact it was the local school children's 
reaction to these pictures that gave 
Continental open sesame to grammar 
schools in the state of New Jersey. 
"Jewels of Desire," "Aunt Cora's Vis- 
it," and "Out Camping" are titles of 
other more serious productions for adult 
audiences. 

Their "Sadie and Mabel" series is one 
of the most interesting phases of Con- 
tinental's work. As two female report- 
ers Sadie and Mabel have made four 
films, their latest being "Out Camp- 
ing," the story of a trip to the north 
woods of Maine. On the trip they cap- 
ture an escaped convict and scoop all 
the papers with their story. 

Continental likes to think that "The 
Tagg Family" started the family series 
of films which were in vogue several 
years ago. Two films were made star- 
ring this "lovable" family. The latest 
to be produced was "Aunt Cora's Visit," 
the tale of an aunt who wanted to help 
spend an inheritance that never came. 

An approach to the ultra-dramatic 
was reached when Continental started 
tc produce their latest film, "The Refu- 
gee," written by the Continental staff. 
The group is proud of the fact that their 
story was written way before Holly- 
wood or other story writers hit upon the 
• Continue J on Page 22 



• Shooting pictures is serious business 
with Continental Pictures' producers. 
Casts are invariably small, rehearsals 
plentiful, and everyone has a definite 
job to do. Here Robert Johnson han- 
dles camera on scene in recently com- 
pleted photoplay. John McNaught di- 
rects, Dorothy Morison checks the 
script and Bob Mason readys a reflec- 
tor unit for a closeup. 




"Cine %l)him&eu y — an 
amateur Aound film 

By | H. SCHOEN 



SoMETHING new and refresh- 
ing in amateur-produced 16mm. sound- 
on-film motion pictures is "Cine Whim- 
sey" in which post-recorded lip-syn- 
chronized sound is successfully em- 
ployed in a combination of narrative, 
dialogue and sound effects. "Cine Whim- 
sey" is a romantic fantasy with definite 
European cinema treatment. The story 
of "boy meets girl and marries her" is 
depicted in a number of situations built 
upon typical American colloquial ex- 
pressions, as for instance: "She swal- 
lowed it hook, line and sinker;" "They 
painted the town red;" "He pulled the 
wool over her eyes," etc. Staging of 
scenes often reached the realm of sur- 
realism as for instance, following the 
narrator's colloquial comment: "She 
gives him the eye," a closeup shows the 
girl's winking eye in the palm of the 
boy's hand — a clever piece of trick cine- 
matography. 

The oddity of such treatment natur- 
ally makes for considerable controversy. 
There are some who will fail to appre- 
ciate this picture: others — more artis- 
tically inclined and perhaps with a her-' 
itage of the European cinema art — 



will evaluate its merits in the light of 
fantastic yet artistic cine story telling. 
The idea is particularly adaptable to 
post-recorded sound where a mixture 
of narrative, music and sound effects 
easily can bridge cueing errors in dub- 
bed lip-synchronized dialogue. 

Briefly, the story concerns a stenog- 
rapher, tired of the daily grind, who is 
given a week's vacation with pay. She 
meets a boy at the beach, and a hasty 
marriage ensues while both are under 
influence of cocktails. The boy relates 
his past, insists he's no good, but prom- 
ises to reform. The girl forgives him 
and they look forward to a "Happy 
whimsical marriage," to use the narra- 



tors closing words. 

Colloquialisms are used freely by the 
commentator in describing the story 
and action and each colloquialism is en- 
acted or depicted. 

Particularly interesting is the clever 
professional opening given the picture. 
Before the first scene flashes on the 
screen, the sound of a motor truck and 
screech of a traffic cop's whistle is 
heard. The first shots shows a delivery 
truck drawing to the curb and tossing 
a bundle of magazines to the pavement. 
A closer shot shows them to be the mag- 
azine TIME. Hands come into the 
scene, cut the strings on the bundle and 
• Continued on Page 27 



1 1 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



• Two title cards in which 
vignetted air-brushed ef- 
fect in background design 
was created by the simple 
process set forth here by 
the author. Below- — show- 
ing simple step-by-step 
process in making air- 
brushed effects in title 
card designs. 



ing a simple tooth brush and a piace of 
ordinary window screen. Dipping the 
brush into paint, it was drawn over the 
screen which was held above the title 
card. The paint laden bristles being 
drawn over the screen would flick mi- 
nute particles of the paint over the 
title card, creating a reasonable ap- 
proach to an airbrush effect. Another 
amateur simply used an ordinary paint 
brush; the brush, dipped in paint, was 
struck against a solid object held near 
the title card, splashing particles of 
paint over it. However, where a fine 
airbrush effect — a good imitation of the 
real thing was wanted — these two sys- 
tems fell far short of success. 

I found the simplest method of gain- 
ing an airbrushed effect was to use or- 
dinary pencil lead, rubbed gently on 
the title card as pictured in the sketches 
below. The two titles at top of page are 
examples of the airbrushed designs cre- 
ated by this method. The whole proce- 
dure is very simple if one will follow the 
illustrations. 



AIRBRUSHED deuyn* (or title* . 



0 



_|NE professional title effect 
coveted by the amateur more than any 
other is the airbrushed designs and 
decorations often seen in the back- 
grounds of many titles in many current 
motion pictures. In Hollywood, air- 
brushed designs in title cards are pro- 
duced by artists with the aid of an in- 



strument that is nothing more or less 
than a diminuitive spray gun. 

With such an instrument usually be- 
yond the means of the average amateur, 
he has sought ether ways in which to 
imitate the airbrushed effect in creat- 
ing background designs for his titles. 
One amateur conceived the idea of us- 



To create the drapery design shown 
in the "End" title above, two patterns 
were cut from card board — one with 
an inverted curve edge, the other a plain 
rectangle. To produce the curved de- 
sign, the curved edge of pattern was 
coated with graphite from a soft pen- 
cil lead as shown in the 1st sketch. This 
pattern was then laid over the title card, 
as shown in 2nd sketch, and the pencil 
graphite rubbed off the pattern on to 

• Continued on Va^c 24 




HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



• This picture sug- 
gests the type of close- 
up and camera set up 
that should be em- 
ployed in filming most 
of the scenes for "The 
Music Lesson," the 
delightful home movie 
scenario offered here. 



SCEMR10 FOR 
INDOOR FILMERS 



f 

HOT a piano in your home? Or 
perhaps a violin? Is there also a child in 
the family who is taking lessons on the 
instrument? Then here's a home movie 
scenario just made to order for you. 
Notable for its fine continuity and fact 
it requires no subtitles, this fine scenario 
is from the pen of a successful European 
movie amateur. The author prefaced his 
original script with the remark: "A 
title is good, but a good scene is better," 
and the manner in which his scenes are 
written ably proves his point. The ac- 
tion, very frequently in closeups, tells 
the story adequately. 

While story is built around a music 
lesson given a child on a piano, other 
instruments may be substituted for the 
piano such as violin, accordion, trum- 
pet, etc., without detracting from or al- 
tering the story idea. Producing this 
scenario will also prove the filmer's 
ability in staging effective reaction 
shots which play such an important part 
in the story. By picturing reaction of 
the maid, the canary, the pet dog and 
a drayhorse, what is going on at the 
piano can be conveyed to an audience 
more eloquently than with the most care- 
fully staged scenes of child and tutor. 

The story presents little, if any, cast- 
ing difficulties. The child, who is to be 
pictured taking the lesson, should be 
capable of acting the part in a most 
natural manner. Most any child, boy or 
girl, given kind and patient direction 
can handle the part. Others required are 
the music teacher, preferably an elder- 
ly man; the housemaid, a canary, dog, 
and a horse. Where any of the three ani- 
mals are unavailable, substitutes or 
equally good situations will suggest 
themselves as alternatives. 

THE MUSIC LESSON 

Scene r. Closeup — doorbell button. 
A man's hand comes into the scene and 
rings twice. 

Scene 2. Medium closeup — front 
door of home. Door opens and music 
teacher enters. Cut as door starts to 
close behind him. 

Scene 3. Interior of home. Front 
door, through which teacher just en- 
tered) in immediate background. Child 
greets teacher, offers hand, and leads 
him out of hall ostensibly toward piano. 

Scene 4. Medium shot. Interior, liv- 
ing room. Piano in immediate back- 
ground. Child and teacher come into 
scene. Child none too eager to com- 



B y S Y D N E 

mence lesson. Slides soberly upon piano 
bench. Teacher sits beside child, opens 
up music case, places music on rack, 
all the while joshing the child to put 
him in right frame of mind. He urges 
child to begin playing. 

(In staging this scene and all sub- 
sequent takes of the same scene, place 
child on bench so he will be nearest 
the camera.) 

Scene 5. Closeup of child's hands on 
piano keys as playing begins. 

Scene 6. Medium shot with camera 
placed immediately back of child and 
teacher. Child is playing, teacher wav- 
ing hand, keeping time with music. 

Scene 7. Closeup of teacher's foot 
beating time as piano being played. 

Scene 8. Closeup of teacher's hand 
beating time, with movement getting 
slower and slower. 



Y L A N D I N 

Scene 9. Medium shot — same as 
scene 4. Teacher's hand beating time as 
ill previous shot. Teacher inclines head 
towards child's hands as though exam- 
ining them closely. He picks hands from 
the keys. Looks at them for a moment 
then with startled expression looks at 
child. 

Scene 10. Closeup of child's hands 
in professor's, showing child's hands 
dirty. 

Scene h. Back to scene 9. Teacher 
scolding child about dirty hands. Sends 
him away to wash them. 

Scene 12. Medium shot. Child leaves 
piano shamefully, exits from room with 
camera following in panning action. 

Scene 13. Closeup of child's hands 
in washbowl scrubbing. 

Scene 14. Back to scene 11. Teacher 
• Continued on Page 2<< 



13 




• Fig. 1 — Novel editor constructed by author which includes rewinds, splicer and a filmviewer that projects film image on ground 
glass screen. 



A WAR-TIME EDITIIG BOARD 



V 

HOW that many important cine 
accessories are unavailable because of 
war restrictions placed upon their man- 
ufacture, building our own gadgets as- 
sumes greater importance as one of the 
most enjoyable phases of our hobby. 
Fortunately, most of us still have ma- 
terials in our garage or workshop junk 
piles with which to make a camera 
gadget or an accessory for titling or 
editing our films. 

Perhaps the most popular cine acces- 
sory, based upon one recent survey, is 
the complete editing board with re- 
winds, splicer and most important of 
all — a good film viewer. Several such 
editors are, or have been, on the market 
for some time. The movie amateur who 
may be unable to buy one at this time 
can easily make a satisfactory editor 
that will serve his purpose by following 
the plans and instructions given here. 

Total cost of this editor can be as 
little as $2.00, depending of course, up- 
on the materials already available, how 
much you may want to "fancy" it up, 
and whether or not you will use your 
projector lens in viewer unit. Inasmuch 
as most readers probably have a splicer, 
details for constructing the home made 
splicer shown in illustration of editor 
above will be omitted here. 



FOR G ADGETEERS 



M 



The baseboard should be about n"x 
32" — uprights %" x 4"> strengthened by 
backing them up with a small piece of 
%" stock. The main upright A should 
be about 13" high. Mount the reel spin- 
dles near the left edge, as shown — one 
on the bottom just high enough to clear 
a 400 ft. reel, and one near the top. The 
small upright B which forms rewind at 
left is 5" high and the spindle is mount- 
ed in the center high enough to clear 
a 400-ft. reel. 

The spindles are made from square 
headed bolts 5 / i6"xzY2". The heads are 
sawed off, leaving the shoulder. Screw 
on two nuts far enough so that a reel 
will just run freely between them and 
the shoulder. The two nuts act as 
spacers to line reel up with the film aper- 
ture. 

Half way between the two reels on 
the tall upright, fasten a piece of strap 
iron C about 12 inches long and bend in 
about 3 inches on the end at a 45 de- 
gree angle to support the viewer. 

The viewer is made by fashioning 



a piece of tin to hold a ground glass or 
frosted celluloid screen D, backed by a 
metal mirror E set at 45 degrees. This 
mirror should be of polished stainless 
steel or chromium. A glass mirror will 
create a double image. Piece of ground 
glass can be obtained from any glass 
store or photographic dealer. 

Cover the top and bottom of the tri- 
angular shaped holder and paint the in- 
side black to kill unwanted light re- 
flections. To further cut down unneces- 
sary reflections and increase brightness 
of viewer screen image, solder a flared 
piece of tin around the border of the 
screen. Paint the inside black. Bend a 
piece of tin around the strap iron sup- 
port and solder it to back of the viewer 
box to serve as a mount for the viewer. 
After the viewer is adjusted so that lens 
throws a picture squarely on the screen, 
the tin mount should be crimped to 
lock it in that position. 

On a level with the strap iron which 
holds the viewer and on the extreme 
right side of the tall upright, fasten the 



14 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PAGE 15 



lens holder F and film gate G. The lens 
holder is designed in ;uch a way as to 
permit the lens to be moved back and 
forth to bring image into focus upon 
the ground glass screen. It is pictured 
below, in Fig. 2, and may be made of 
a heavy piece of tin or other sheet metal. 
One piece, bent in the form shown in 
sketch, will provide the complete lens 
holder and the means for attaching it to 
the upright A. 

An alternative for this fixture is to 
purchase, from a hardware or dime 
store, one of the metal spring broom 
clips. These are originally intended for 
purpose of holding broom and mop 
sticks in place in broom closet. These 
are easily bent to fit any size projector 
lens. 

With this fixture in place, it is ready 
to take the lens for the purpose of cen- 
tering and focusing same upon the 
ground glass screen D, after which the 
lens holder may be securely screwed in- 
to place. As already suggested, it is un- 
necessary to purchase a separate lens for 
this purpose. The lens from your pro- 
jector may be "borrowed" as needed 
and fitted into place to complete the 
viewer assembly. 

Of course, it is more convenient to 
have the lens permanently in place at 
all times and where this is desired, it is 
suggested that an odd projection lens 
be purchased. These are usually avail- 
able from camera stores, most of whom 
have several old model projectors of the 
cheaper grade in stock which were taken 
in on trade for new models. The lenses 
from such projectors usually may be 
had for a dollar or two. 

The film gate G is constructed as fol- 
lows: Base is a rectangular piece of 
heavy tin about \ x / 2 "~&z x A" fastened to 
the edge of the heavy upright by two 
screws. Cut an aperature in the gate the 
size of a single frame of film where it 
will line up with the lens. The guides 
are made next. Cut from tin and bend 
to shape in a vise. Smooth the edges 
with a fine file or fine emery cloth. 
Next, cut a piece of felt to match the 
face of the gate and mount the film 
guides to the gate using the felt as a 



washer to protect the film. The guides 
can be fastened to the gate by using 
small rivets made from nails. For de- 
tails of film gate see sketch below. 

The spring arm (See B - Fig 2) should 
be fashioned next and may be either 
soldered or riveted in place. It should 
be made so that it doesn't touch the pic- 
ture area but merely rides edge of the 
film near the perforations to keep film 
in place as it passes the aperture. Ten- 
sion should be just enough to hold the 
film in place without drag. 

Next mount the 1 5 watt light H 
back of the aperture. Bend and affix a 
cheap chromium spoon for a reflector 
as shown. The light can be elevated to 
the correct height by using three layers 
of Y 4 inch wood and a piece of strap 
iron as shown in photo. The third layer 
of wood is smaller than the others and 
forms a glove fit for the talcum pow- 
der can light cover J. An aperture must 
be cut in the can to match aperture in 
film gate. Also, holes must be punched 
in top of can to allow heat to escape. 

The three pieces of wood forming lamp 
base are securely fastened together and 
then mounted to the editor base by one 
screw at the near right corner. This al- 
lows the entire lamp- assembly to swing 
away from the gate for easy threading. 
In other words, it is necessary to shift 
reel from top spindle on support A to 
left rewind spindle B, and vice versa 
during the process of viewing, editing 
and splicing the films. The winding 
cranks remain in the reels. 

The small light socket can be pur- 
chased complete with switch. Also, an 
outside switch can be mounted to con- 
trol all lar.-.ps on editor. The one shown 
in the photo K is a 4-way switch. First 
position of switch lights the viewer 
lamp, second, the work lamp, third, 
turns off viewer lamp and leaves work 



• Sketched below are details of con- 
struction of principal parts of author 
Morton's editor. An innovation is 
method that provides for "borrow- 
ing" lens from projector to furnish 
element for projecting film image on 
ground glass of viewer. 



lamp on, and fourth turns all lights off. 
It's mighty handy but not indispensible. 

To provide rewinding action, a sim- 
ple expedient is employed that involves 
attaching small cranks to the reels them- 
selves as shown in photo. With the 
cranks in place, reels may be turned for- 
ward or backward. Cranks are attached 
to reels by means of split pins which fit 
into the small holes in the reels as may 
be seen in the picture. Where reels do 
not have these holes, holes may be drilled 
into them for the purpose. The cranks 
may be fashioned from strap iron, bent 
to shape and the split pins and handle 
soldered or welded into place. 

The splicer should be mounted on 
the baseboard midway betweeen the 
viewer and the left rewind, and with 
the film track centered on the line of 
travel of the film between the rewind 
and the spindles on the upright A. This 
allows ample room to work with the 
film for either cutting or splicing. 

On the board described here, a work- 
light was mounted immediately above 
the splicer. It is supported by a strap 
iron bracket, made of the same ma- 
terial as the bracket C supporting the 
viewer, and attached at the back of the 
baseboard. To this was attached a small 
candelabra light socket that takes a 7 
watt 110 volt light bulb. However, the 
nightlights that are now available at 
most dime stores will serve admirable 
for this purpose and may be easily at- 
tached to the bracket. Also, they in- 
clude a snap switch in the base and 
may be had for either the standard base 
or candelabra base lamps. 

Now, a few pointers on using the 
editor. In use, the film passes from the 
upper reel N, past the aperture to the 
lower reel in exactly the same position 
as in projection. The emulsion side is 
away from the lens and shows a clear, 
enlarged picture on the screen. The pic- 
tures will be transposed but this is a 
minor consequence in comparison to the 
advantages of keeping the emulsion side 
up, not only for film protection but to 
be in correct position for splicing. When 
the place to cut the film comes along, 
• Continued on Page 27 





FILM 
GATE 



FIG. 2- 




LENS 
HOLDER 



SPLIT PINS v 

f C" V 



c 




REEL CRANK 




HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



o Blue photofloods are manufactured 
only for one purpose — to supplement 
daylight. Here, blue photofloods are 
employed as booster lights in an ex- 
terior scene otherwise illuminated by 
daylight. 



Color filming, with 

bu e PHOTOFLOODS 



B y 



M 



it 



RECENT queries to the editors 
suggest that some amateurs are confused 
or at least are not fully informed re- 
garding the values and limitations of 
blue "daylight" photofloor lamps, espe- 
cially when used with Kodachrome. A 
recent question concerned the proba- 
bility of using blue photofloods as a 
means of illuminating interiors that 
were to be filmed entirely with regular 
outdoor Kodachrome. 

It is erroneously believed by some that 
the illumination supplied by blue pho- 
tofloods approximates that of daylight 
both in intensity and in color and, there- 
fore, it would be possible to successfully 
use these lamps in lighting interior sets 
to be filmed with regular Kodachrome. 
This is not only untrue but the light 
emitted by blue photofloods is of lesser 
intensity than that of regular photo- 
floods due to the blue color of the glass 
from which the globe is made. 

In Kodachrome photography, not only 
are the direction and intensity of the 
lighting important, but also color of 
the light. Ignorance of this fact prob- 
ably accounts for much of the unsatis- 



factory results which have been had by 
many serious amateurs using color film. 
Long before Kodachrome was intro- 
duced, photofloods had become the es- 
tablished means of illumination for in- 
door photography where artificial light 
was used. When the type A Kodachrome 
emulsion for interior use was evolved, it 
was based upon a standardized color 
temperature of the original white pho- 
toflood bulb. The color temperature of 
these photofloods is still much lower 
than natural daylight even though it is 
higher than that of the average house- 
hold mazda lamp. And in spite of its 
visual brilliance, the standard photo- 
flood emits less blue and green light as 
compared to its emission of red and yel- 
low. Daylight or "regular type" Koda- 
chrome, therefore, if used indoors with 
regular photofloods, would produce pic- 
tures preponderantly reddish in tone. 
Thus we have in the regular photoflood 
a lamp which is not only lower in color 
temperature than natural daylight, but 
deficient in its ability to emit adequate 
blue and green light for regular Koda- 
chrome photography. 



The blue "daylight" photoflood, on 
the other hand, while possessing an in- 
herent ability to correct the color of 
light, is likewise short of actual day- 
light in color temperature, being rated 
at 4000" K when burned at 120 volts 
as compared to the color temperature of 
daylight of approximately 6000" K. for 
which regular Kodachrome is balanced. 

Blue photofloods are manufactured 
only for one purpose — to supplement 
daylight. If an interior must be filmed 
which requires artificial light but where 
some natural daylight is coming through 
a window within the field of the cam- 
era lens or even outside the camera 
range, blue photofloods are required to 
balance the illumination for color for 
daylight Kodachrome. These lamps are 
recommended for no other use. It is un- 
economical to use the more expensive 
blue photofloods with daylight Koda- 
chrome as the sole source of illumina- 
tion. The color values are not as criti- 
cally held to an absolute color temper- 
ature as is the case with regular photo- 
floods. This is a practical difficulty aris- 
ing out of the fact that it is not feasible 
to make lamp bulbs of tinted glass with 
the same accuracy as filters are con- 
structed. 

In using either white or blue photo- 
floods, it is important to maintain the 
correct voltage for which the lamps are 
made to burn. This at once presents a 
difficulty for the average amateur shoot- 
ing pictures in the home, for certainly 
few, if any, have the means at the.r 
command to regulate the voltage in the 
power line entering the average dwell- 
ing. This statement is offered, however, 
to indicate one of the difficulties that 
lies before the amateur seeking the pin- 
nacle of perfection in indoor Koda- 
chrome photography. In studios, it is 
possible to regulate current voltage, to 
increase or decrease it according to 
number of lights being used, in order 
to obtain the maximum efficiency from 
incandescent lights. 

With the electrical load required in 
lighting the average amateur indoor 
setting, some drop in voltage is certain 
to result. And if shooting takes place 
in the early evening hours, the voltage 
will be even lower. In professional stu- 
dios, if the voltage is low and cannot 
be raised, color temperature is compen- 
pensated for through use of filters, al- 

• Continued on Page 26 



16 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



o Proper placement of lights is im- 
portant to achieving an even, over- 
all contrast in titles. Reflectors 
should be ad.usted to cast light 
from each side rather than directly 
from camera position. 




Succetefjul title* depend upon 



RECENT articles appearing in 
Home Movies on the subject of home 
movie titling have treated the phases 
of title composition, background selec- 
tion and styles of title lettering or type. 
This month we take up the subject of 
exposure and the elements of contrast 
and developing as they affect the final 
photographic result. 

All the care and planning that goes 
into preparation of a title is quickly lost 
if, in the final step — photographing the 
title — exposure is incorrect. On the oth- 
er hand, if contrast between title text 
and the title card or background is at a 
minimum, a poor title will result even 
with accurate exposure. And where the 
amateur develops his own positive film 
titles, he may expose carefully on a 
highly contrasty title, yet achieve poor 
results through careless developing. 

Let us consider first the problems of 
the filmer shooting titles on regular re- 
versal film. One hurdle — that of proper 
development (or processing) of the film 
— is overcome because the laboratory 
takes care of this. Left for him are the 
problems of composition and filming. 
Since we treated the subject of contrast 
in title composition at some length in 
the November issue (Pg. 426), we shall 



• Examples of care- 
fully made titles. Note 
even contrast in both 
title backgrounds — no 
"hot spots," no light- 
er or darker areas. 
Text is easily readible, 
result of careful fo- 
cusing, even lighting, 
and proper exposure. 



17 



care 



/«/ EXPOSURE 



summarize by reminding that the most 
successful black and white title will re- 
sult from a jet black card lettered in 
snow white ink. 

On the subject of filming the title, 
placement of lights is most important 
where title is to be photographed under 
artificial light. In spite of the wide 
beam of light emanating from the aver- 
age photoflood reflector, especially at 
distances of from 12 to 24 inches from 
the title card, it is possible to light the 
title card unevenly with the result that 
"hot spots" or uneven density in the 
background may result. Nearly all of 
us have seen home made titles where the 
edges appeared lighter than the rest of 
the title, or the center or one corner 
appeared lighter. This was because the 
light from photofloods was not evenly 
distributed over the title card. 

This uneven light distribution is not 
visible to the naked eye and so cannot 
be detected and corrected before start- 
ing to photograph the title. However, 




W . 



M 



several amateurs have conducted en- 
lightening tests that prove there is a 
right and wrong position in which to 
place photofloods to illuminate a title. 

For example, where two photofloods 
in reflectors are set up on either side 
of the camera to light a title card 10 
by 14 inches, it was found that if the 
lights were placed 18 inches distant 
from title and 60 0 apart, calculating 
from vertical center of title, intensity 
of light reaching edges of title card 
would be twice that reaching the center. 

By swinging the lights out to 120 0 so 
that the light came more from the sides, 
distribution of light was equalized over 
entire area of title card. There were no 
hot spots, no "lows" or "highs" — al- 
though the volume of light was reduced 
considerably. In other words, by placing 
the lights at same distance from center 
of title card, i. e., 18 inches, but farther 
away to the sides, a more even lighting 
is obtained at a sacrifice of light bril- 

• Continued on Pa^c 25 



"I think I'll take ijour advice 



about that secretary/.' 



VOW JONl, 



PACE 18 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 




Scoring Aid 



Amateurs who add sound, by means 
of phonograph records, to their home 
movies will find this record scoring gad- 
get a real help. It eliminates all guess- 
work as to just where to set the pickup 
down on the record to get any certain 
section of a musical selection or sound 
effect. 

By setting the sliding pointer to coin- 
cide with pre%iously prepared score 
sheet settings, an operator can bring any 
certain section of a recording "in" at 
the proper time, even in the middle of 
a film. This is especially helpful where 
one wants to add a certain sound effect 
to a scene and wants it to come out 
right every time. 

Cut a piece of ]/» inch "hardened" 
masonite or other suitable material to 
the shape shown in the photograph and 
glue a length of white celluloid ruler 
on one side. 

Next, make a sleeve from brass or 
heavy tin that will silde up and down 
the scale easily. Drill and tap a small 
hole in one side of sleeve for a small 
set screw. It really is easier to make the 
sleeve first and then cut the masonite 
pointer to fit. The sleeve can easily be 
made by bending a flat piece of brass 
or tin around the gadget, or a piece of 
iron about the same size, and soldering 
it where the two ends meet. If material 
from which sleeve is made is very thin, 
it may be necessarv to solder a nut to 



PASS 'EM ALONG! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. Extraordinary ideas 
will bring you a roll of film. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they duplicate ideas previous- 
If submitted. 

Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 
use. 



THE EXPERIMENTAL 



provide threads for the set screw. Ce- 
ment a white arrow cut from celluloid 
or cardboard to the under side of the 
sleeve to complete the sliding pointer. 

To prevent slider from scratching 
record, cement a washer of masonite on 
the underside of the rounded part of 
the gadget to raise it up off the record. 
A piece of felt cemented on the other 
end rides the edge of the record for the 
same purpose. The hole for the spindle 
should be snug but should not bind. 

To use gadget, simply set the pointer 
in the desired position on the scale and 
place on the record. At the proper mo- 
ment set the pickup needle down where 
the pointer indicates and remove the 
pointer. Reset the pointer for the next 
change immediately. — Al Morton, Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 



Monopod 



Every movie amateur at one time or 
another can use a monopod — a one- 
legged tripod that can be easily carried 
in crowds, set up in a hurry to make 
pictures in close quarters, and provide 
solid support for the camera as well as 
provide for panning by virtue of the 
pivoting action possible by the single 
"leg." 

Anyone can build this monopod if he 
has a hammer, saw, brace and bit, knife, 
screw driver and a paint brush. List of 
materials required are as follows — most 
of them unaffected by priorities. (Let- 
ters A, B, C, etc., refer to parts as shown 
in illustration below) : 

One piece of wood Y/'\i-$ i6"x 
28 1 / 2 " long. 

One piece of wood 3 4"xi-5 i6"x 

33 /V lon 8- 
One block of wood 

1-5 <'i6"xiy 8 ". 
Two wood screws. 
Machine screw for 



A. 
B. 

C. 



1-3/ 1 6 X 



D. 
E. 



securing 



F. 



camera. 

V4" stove bolt and wing nut. 



G. Y 4 " stove bolt, washer and nut. 

The end where camera is fastened 
should be made to fit individual camera 
requirements, as to size and location of 
machine screw E. — Clarence Aldrich, 
Long Beach, Calif. 

Camera-Light Stand 

By fitting a tripod screw to the top 
of the sliding rod of the ordinary col- 
lapsible metal light standard, it may be 
used as a camera tripod and, when fit- 
ted with a wooden cross-arm, as pic- 
tured, a combination camera tripod and 
lighting unit results. 

A quarter-inch No. 20 bolt can be 
soldered to end of rod or rod may be 
drilled and tapped to take a short sec- 
tion of the bolt where rod is of ample 




diameter. A "stop" for the cross-arm 
consists of an ordinary round metal 
washer soldered to rod. 

This arrangement comes in handy 
when filming with Kodachrome where a 
flat lighting is required. Clamp-on re- 
flectors of any number may be mount- 
ed along side the camera on the wooden 
cross-arm. — George Carlson, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Light Boom 

Want to make an adjustable light 
boom for your indoor lighting equip- 
ment? Here's how you can rig one up 
for use on an ordinary metal light stand- 



FRONT 

tt- 



2S ■'/!.•- 



SIDE_ 



WINS NUT 




SHOWING 
MONOPOD 
IN USE 



WHEN FOLDED 



■5 ft- 



■2'Ai'- 



LOCflTION OF HOLES IN 8 



LOCUTION OF SLOTS IN Ft 



o - t %- 



TT — 

-*-© 



■ 2" * Z'/ri 



"UTTF 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 19 



till WORKSHOP tmJ§ah tricki & 



THUMB SCREW 




REINFORCING- 
STRIP 



HOLE TO FIT 
TRIPOD TOP 



BOOM 



aid, using wood instead of scarce metal 
materials. 

Select a piece of spruce or other ma- 
terial i /4"xi Yz" for the boom. Rein- 
force this by nailing a strip of %" ply- 
wood, i Yz" wide, on edge on top 
of boom strip. Device for coupling 
boom to light standard and which will 
permit radial adjustment as well as 
shortening or lengthening of boom, is 
shown in detail in sketch. All pieces are 
made of wood. Necessary hardware con- 
sists of two bolts and wing nuts and 
one set screw. 

A is tilt top unit through which 
boom slides. Bolt and wing-nut at top 
provide means of locking boom in place. 
Wing nut AA provides for radial ad- 
justment of boom. B is block which fits 
tripod or light stand and to which unit 
A is attached by means of bolt and 
wing-nut AA. C shows cross section 
of boom and reinforcing strip. — C. M. 
DeLattder, Holliday's Cove, West Va. 

Tripod Stabilizer 

Having occasion to shoot a lot of 
movies from grandstands and similar 
close quarters, I have built a simple sta- 
bilizer for my tripod as pictured here. 
The stabilizer rests on the floor. Tripod 
legs are inserted in the holes and locked 
securely to the stabilizer by means of 
the cleats held in place by wing-nuts 
and bolts. I sit with my legs wrapped 




around the tripod legs and my feet on 
the stabilizer, when shooting from a 
grandstand, thus providing a rock 
steady support for my tripod-mounted 
camera. 

Stabilizer was constructed as follows: 
An equilateral triangle was cut from a 
piece of %" plywood, each side being 
12" in length. At each corner, holes 
were drilled to fit tripod legs. Measur- 
ing in 1 Ya" from each hole, another Ya" 
hole was drilled. These accommodated 
the quarter-inch bolts and wing nuts 
which secure the wooden cleats for each 
leg as pictured. — R. M. Gridlcy, Beaver, 
Penna. 

Home-Made Reflectors 

In spite of priorities, those conical 
shaped metal reflectors painted white 
on the inside and green outside, are still 
available from electrical and hardware 
stores and in some dime stores. These 
may be rigged up to serve as suitable re- 
flector units for photofloods as follows: 

A suitable low standard may be made 
from wood, instead of metal, as shown 




in sketch. Two pieces should be cut 
from pine or plywood. One piece 
A is attached to the reflector by means 
of screws; the piece B serves as the up- 
right, being attached to section A by 
means of a short bolt and wing-nut. 
Where light is to be used at low levels, 
a wooden base may be added to the sup- 
port. Where light standards or tripods 
are to be used, reflectors may be fitted 
to them by drilling a hole 2" in depth 
up through bottom of section B. This 
permits unit being placed over top of 
trpiod or light standard. 

Light socket is added to the reflector 
by means of the usual brass fixture col- 



&kortcut£ contri- 
buted by, Cine bug* 



lar which is available wherever the re-- 
flectors are sold. — H. R. Schmidt, Chi- 
cago, III. 

Out-dated Film 

Unexposed, out-dated reversal cine 
film may be restored and made usable 
with satisfactory results by placing the 
film in its original package in an elec- 
tric refrigerator and leaving it there 
for three days. Restoration lasts for 
about thirty days during which time 
the film must be used or again subject- 
ed to the refrigeration process. Positive 
film may be treated in the same manner. 
Also speed of positive film may be in- 
creased approximately one stop by giv- 
ing it the ice box treatment. — James 
Griggs, Orange, N. J. 

Dual Turntables 

I utilized a discarded console type 
rndio cabinet for my dual turntables, 
placing one turntable over the other, as 
pictured here. Cabinet contains ampli- 
fier, which was attached beneath top 
shelf or immediately beneath the top 
turntable. Panel containing switches, 
faders, etc., was mounted adjacent to 
this. There is a pilot light over each 
turntable. — Bob Mayne, Muskegon, 
Mich. 




PAGE 20 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



M 




ome movie 



Where to rent or buy 8mm. and 16mm. films 



*0 augment your home movie shows, make use of the fine libraries 
of rental films, both sound and silent, maintained by your photo dealer for 
owners of 8mm. and 16mm. projectors. Rental rates are surprisingly low and 
new films are added at regular intervals. Dealers listed below will gladly assist 
with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 



CALIFORNIA 

HOLLYWOOD 

Bailey Film Service 
1 65 1 Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
716 N. La Brea Ave. 

Castle's Inc. 
1529 Vine Street 

Morgan Camera Shop 
6262 Sunset Blvd. 

LOS ANGELES 

Films Incorporated 
1709 W. 8th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
Photo & Sound. Inc. 
153 Kearny St. 

Robert Crawford Studios 
126 Post Street 
Telephone: YUkon 1234 

SANTA MONICA 

Stewart Photo Company 
1257 Third Street 



CONNECTICUTT 

WATERBURY 

Multiprises 

100 E. Main St., 

P. O. Box 1125 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1221 G St., N. W. 



ILLINOIS 



BERWYN 



Colonial Camera Shop 
6906 Windsor Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1825 La'chmont Ave. 

Films Incorporated 
64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 



INDIANA 



INDIANAPOLIS 

W. Stuart Bussey 

17 East St. Joseph St. 



IOWA 



MASON CITY 



Decker Bros. 

209 No. Federal Ave. 



KANSAS 



WICHITA 



Jeff's Camera Shop 
139 N. Broadway 



Lewis Film Exchange 
216 East 1st St. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



Don Elder's Film Library 
739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 

Frank Lane and Company 
S Little Building 



MICHIGAN 



DETROIT 



Detroit Camera Shop 
325 State Street 



NEW YORK 

ALBANY 

Albany Camera Shop Rental Library 
204 Washington Avenue 

KENMORE 

Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
2811 Delaware Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Films, Incorporated 
330 W. 42nd St. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 4Sth St. 

Haber & Fink, Inc. 
12-14 Warren St. 

Medo Photo Supply 
IS West 47th St. 

National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 
Nu-Art Films, Inc. 
145 West 45th Street 



OHIO 



CINCINNATI 



Ralph V. Haile & Assoc. 
215 Walnut St. 



DAYTON 



Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 



OREGON 



PORTLAND 



Films Incorporated 
314 S. W. 9th Avenue 

TEXAS 

DALLAS 

National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 
2024 Main St. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON 



Elmer B. Simpson 
816 W. Virginia St. 



3fj uou want a 

FILM to show 

. . . NEWS OF TIMELY SUBJECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Castle War Films 

Fresh from the battlefields of North 
Africa has come an authentic motion 
picture record of recent great Allied 
victories. The vivid highlights of this 
action is incorporated into a special 
8mm. and i6mm. release for home pro- 
jectors by Castle Flms. 

First part of the film "Yanks Invade 
Africa" is an on-the-spot report of the 
opening of the Second Front. Thrilling 
news today are the scenes of the greatest 
sea-borne invasion the world has ever 
known. One literally holds his breath as 
the huge convoy gathers, then sails 
through submarine infested waters to 
its objectives. American troops swarm 
ashcre in special invasion barges with all 
the la test in equipment. Cheering French 
and natives greet the alert Yanks as 
they march into such key cities as Oran. 

"Victory Over Rommel," the closely 
related subject on the same reel, pictures 
the first smashing defeat of Rommel, 
the Nazi desert fox. Battered from the 
gates of Suez, Rommel flees hundreds 
of miles across the burning desert, his 
torces shattered and reeling. Scenes of 
desert land and air war in all its fun- 
show burning trucks, enemy planes, and 
blasted tanks. A night battle leaves an 
unforgettable memory of the flaming 
ferociousness of this vital fight. 

"Yanks Invade Africa" and "Victory 
Over Rommell" can be obtained now 
from photographic stores in both 8mm. 
and 1 6mm. sizes. 

Red Riding Hood 

Mr. Wolf tries his wiles with amaz- 
ing results in a hilarious version of "Lit- 
tle Red Riding Hood," one of the series 
of nine black and white cartoons re- 
leased by Certified Film Distributors, 
Inc., in 8mm. and i6mm. silent and 
scund. The famous tale of Little Red 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 21 




CRAIG EDITING NEEDS 



CRAIS SENIOR SPLICER & COMBINATION 
Combination incorporates Sr. Splicer and Rewinds 
. . . lists at $21.50. Splicer alone. $10.95 — 
Rewinds. $5.00 each. 



Riding Hood is given a new twist when 
grandma, sick in bed, gets a tonic that 
restores her youth — and the wolf falls 
head over heels in love with her. A sur- 
prise finish high-spots the climax. Other 
cartoon titles include: Circus Capers, 
Fly's Bride, Gypped in Egypt, Jail 
Breakers, Toytown Tale, King of Bugs, 
Noah Knew His Ark and Western Whoo- 
pee. In addition, three comedies: Flip 
Flops, Harvest Hands and Uneasy 
Three, are available in 8mm. and 16mm. 
silent. For descriptive folder, address 
Certified Film Distributors, Inc., 25 
West 45 th Street, New York City. 





Combination includes Splicer. Rewind 
water container and cement . . . lists 
$8.95 complete. Splicer alone. $3.95 — 
Rewinds, $2.50 each. 

CRAIG FOTOFADE — makes 
smooth Fades and Wipes . . . 
Complete kit. $1.75. 
CRAIG CINETINTS — six crys- 
tal-clear dyes. 55c each; kit ol 
53.25. 



(0* 



Write for 
Literature 



CRAIG MOVIE 
SUPPLY CO. 

Los Angeles * Seattle 
San Francisco 




Traffic Film 

"Motors On Parade" has often been 
dubbed "A speeder's nightmare.' A po- 
tent force in the campaign for highway 
safety, this film produced by the Los 
Angeles Police Department shows train- 
ing methods, functions and objectives 
of the citys highway patrol. This pic- 
ture is one reel in length in 16mm. 
black and white and in sound and is 
available from Bell & Howell's Filmo- 
sound libraries either on rental or out- 
right sale. 

Another timely traffic film is "Foot 
Faults" on the subject of pedestrian 
safety. Also produced by the Los An- 
geles Police Department, it runs one 
reel 16mm. sound and is distributed 
by Bell & Howell's Filmosound libraries. 
Further details may be had by writing 
Bell & Howell Co., 1801 Larchmont 
Ave., Chicago. 

Disney Cartoons 

Granted exclusive license by Walt 
Disney to produce Mickey Mouse and 
Donald Duck cartoons in 8mm. and 
1 6mm. widths for home projectors, 
Hollywood Film Enterprises announce 



EVERY-- 

Soldier 
Sailor 
Marine 

NEEDS THIS BOOK! 

Records they keep now will be helpful in obtaining government 
benefits later to which they are entitled. If you have a man in 
service, send him a copy of this book so he can write therein all the 
data concerning his service he will need after discharge. The book 
also answers practically every question he can ask regarding what 
benefits he will or will not be entitled to during his term of service 
as well as after discharge. Do your service man a big service — send 
him this book today! 



S«|00 

POSTPAID 



VER HALEN 

6060 SUNSET BOULEVARD 



PUBLICATIONS 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIFORNIA 



PAGE 22 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



* 
★ 
★ 
* 



4) Meliaqe to 
the public and 
the tetailet: 



GOERZ 



PHOTO LENSES 
AMERICAN product 

since 1899 

made by 

AMERICAN labor 
AMERICAN -owned 

factory 



We have no connection 
with any other firm 



TO THE RETAILER: 

Because of their accuracy Goerz lenses 
are front line photo-optical equipment in 
many fields of activity of our Nation at 
War . . . 

The utmost is being done to meet the 
demands of the Coiernment for these 
photographic precision tools . . . 
From time to time there may be available 
some of these fine ariastigmats for civilian 
use and so Wt invite you" to '-write us 
about your requirements . . . • 



There is a Goerz Lens for 
Every Purpose 

To help you in the selection of the 
proper lens our long experience is at 
your service — For detailed information 

and prevailing prices see your dealer or 
ADDRESS DEPT. HM-1 

C. P. Goerz American Optical Co. 

Office and Factory 

* 317 East 34th Street New York * 




8mm.- 1 6mm. -35mm. 

/ KODACHROM 

rt£" OF THE BEAUT I FU 



CAVERNS 
of LURAY 



This extremely Interesting and most unusual film 
Hill make a valuable addition to your film library. 

36 - 2x2 KODACH ROM E SLIDES — » for — J 1 .00 
100 Ft. 16mm. KODACHROKE P P 10 00 

SO Ft. 16mm. KODACHROME 0 A 6.00 
50 Ft. 8mm. KODACHROME S I 8.00 

25 Ft. 8mm. KODACHROME T D J. 50 

LURAY CAVERNS, Bx. 1 076, Luray, Va. 



16mm SOUND on Film 

Recording Studio and Editing Facilities 
BERNDT-MAURER RECORDER 

CEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 



995-A Merchandise Mart 



CHICAGO 



additions to the new series of animated 
cartoon subjects now being distributed 
by this company and their affiliated 
dealer agents. 

Six Shooter Mickey is title of one 
of the latest cartoons which depicts 
Mickey Mouse as a rough, tough west- 
erner who rescues Minnie Mouse from 
that famed scoundrel, Peg-Leg Pete. 
Highlights of action is battle between 
Mickey and Peg-Leg on edge of preci- 
pice, with Mickey subduing his giant 
opponent and winning the hand of 



Minnie. 

Released simultaneously was Donald 
Duck in Donald's Mexican Romance, a 
mirth-provoking skit with Donald as 
a Mexican troubador astride a donkey 
and playing his guitar. 

The above subjects, as well as others 
in the newly released series are fully 
described in a new catalogue of home 
movie films just issued by Hollywood 
Him Enterprises. Copy may be had free 
by writing the company at 6060 Sun- 
set Blvd.. Hollywood, Calif. 



Plan 'em like pro^eiiionali . . 



• Continued from Page so 

idea — which they did a year or so later. 
"The Refugee" is the story of an Eng- 
lish refugee boy who comes over to 
America right after war breaks out. 
Complications set in when the Ameri- 
can boy, at whose home the English re- 
fugee is staying, resents the intrusion of 
a "foreigner," while his sister falls in love 
with the English lad. Everything works 
out for the best. The refugee boy saves 
all their lives when a saboteur tries to 
do some dirty work. 

Robert Johnson is, perhaps, the bus- 
iest executive of the organization. In 
charge of productions, it is his job to 
pass on stories, select casts, O. K. prop- 
erties and costumes and direct and pho- 
tograph Continental's productions. 

"The success of our organization," 
said Johnson, "Is due, as much as any- 
thing else, to the fact that from the 
very beginning we recognized that we 
first must have a good screen story to 
make a successful motion picture. We 
recognize three essential steps in put- 
ting an amateur screen story together: 
first, story conference — writer and col- 
laborators get together, work out plot 
and story outline; second, story is put 
into scenario form; and third, the sce- 
nario is analyzed as to the best possible 
camera set-ups — closeups, medium or 
long' shots,' etc — that will enhance the 
action and motivate the story. 

"When we are writing a scenario, we 
always keep in mind the properties, set- 
tings and locations that are available, 
and with gasoline rationing, this is more 
important than ever. We've even re- 
written scenes originally intended to 
take place on interior settings so they 
could be enacted in outdoor locations 
and thus accomplished savings on film 
and lighting costs. 

"Simplicity in casts is a keynote in all 
of our productions. We have found that 
the smaller the cast we have to handle, 
the more successful the production and 
the easier it is on all members of the 
production staff. Rehearsals are consid- 
ered an important item in that they not 



only save film but assure smoother per- 
formance of the cast. In our opinion, all 
amateur movies would be considerably 
improved if the filmers would insist up- 
on one or two rehearsals before actually 
shooting an action scene. 

"The acting ability of an amateur 
cast should never be over-estimated. For 
this reason, we never write into our 
scripts parts that only Bette Davis or 
Clark Gable could successfully handig. 
We keep the action as simple but as 
natural as possible consistent with the 
abilities of our cast. Pantomine is 
stressed as an important element in si- 
lent motion pictures and as a means of 
lessening the number of spoken or de- 
scriptive titles required to retain coher- 
ence in the story." 

This intelligent analysis of amateur 
movie production requirements certain- 
ly indicates why Continental Pictures 
became at once successful and has re- 
mained so for more than six years. In 
1939, the organization began to assume 
national importance. McXaught and 
Johnson had heard from other amateur 
producing groups throughout the na- 
tion, suggested they join together in a 
national chain of amateur producing 
units. The Amateur Movie Producers 
of America resulted. AMP boasts a 
membership of more than 12 amateur 
organizations stretching from Maine to 
California. Chief benefit of the tieup is 
the interchange of each other's films 
and, of course, the incentive that re- 
sults to continaully produce new films 
to circulate among this ever growing 
circuit of appreciative contemporaries. 

The average cine club could take a 
lesson from Continental Pictures, for 
surely no greater benefits could accrue 
to movie amateurs than the experience 
and the wide appreciation of effort that 
results from cooperative production of 
planned motion pictures. Given the 
same intelligent leadership, any group 
of cine amateurs could match the suc- 
cess of Continental Pictures. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 23 



REVIEWS ... 



of cAmateur film* 



B y 



S C H 0 E N 



I HREE films, each rating three 
stars, is our dish of reviews for this 
month. Purposely selected for review 
and criticism here with the object of 
pointing out what one should and should 
not do in producing the more ambi- 
tious, continuity type of picture, are 
three amateur photoplays. 

It is possible for the amateur to pro- 
duce really convincing photodramas or 
comedies providing he has an adequate 
cast, a good story and most important 
— the ability to direct as well as photo- 
graph the picture. Amateurs and cine 
club groups striving for effectual pho- 
toplay production must first recognize 
these facts. 

All three pictures reviewed here were 
produced from continuities with real 
merit. Developing the plot a little fur- 
ther, squeezing the utmost in acting 
ability from the cast, and more careful 
editing would, in each case, result in a 
possible Movie of the Month. 

^^Rangers of Outlaw Flats" is a 
200-foot 8mm. Kodachrome photoplay 
produced by C. Clary of Glendale, Calif., 
a city that has given the cine world 
some of the most interesting amateur 
made films this year. Story concerns a 
cattleman who sells his ranch for cash 
and then is robbed of the money by an 
unfaithful employee. His wife sum- 
mons help of local Rangers who pur- 
sue and capture the crooked employee, 
retrieve the cash, and take the culprit 
off to jail. 

Chief weakness is in the story. There's 
little plot to it although it could have 
been developed into a real thriller. Con- 
sidering the talent this filmer had to 
work with — several members of a group 
of Ranger volunteers with natty uni- 
forms, horses, etc., some fine locations, 
and a plethora of western scenery — it is 
regrettable a better action picture did 
not result. But no severe criticism is 
due filmer Clary, for this is practically 
his first amateur movie. Much credit 
is due him for daring to undertake so 
pretentious a picture, for his excellent 
photography, his choice of locations and 
the editing and titling of his picture. 

There is little doubt that already he 
has profited much by the mistakes and 
shortcomings of his initial feature pro- 
duction and that he is an amateur to be 
reckoned with in future competitions. 



• All amateurs, whether subscribers 
to HOME MOVIES or not, are invited 
to submit their films to the editors 
for review and helpful criticism. 

Reviewed films will be rated one, 
two three, and four stars, and films 
qualifying for two or more stars will 
receive, free, an animated leader. 

Exceptional films qualifying for 
the distinction of the "Movie of the 
Month" will be treated in detail in 
a feature-length article in a follow- 
ing issue of HOME MOVIES. In ad- 
dition, a certificate evidencing the 
award of "Movie of the Month" and 
a special animated "Movie of the 
Month" leader will be returned with 
such films after review. 



Out of Oklahoma comes another 
western "hoss opera" that rated the re- 
viewer's three-star merit leader. "Death 
Rides the Range" running 400 feet in 
8mm. Kodachrome was produced by 
Fritz Holzerbein and Eugene Heflin of 
Oklahoma City. The producers had a 
good story but failed to get the utmost 
from their cast. By allowing the cast to 
run rampant during filming, injecting 
business here and there not called for in 
the script, much of the sincerity neces- 
sary to the plot was eliminated. 

Story concerns a bad man who holds 
up a rancher homeward bound from the 
bank with the payroll. Rancher is killed 
and the bandit escapes. Later his trail is 
picked up by trio of cowhands and a 
chase results. Eventually the dead ran- 
cher's daughter is injected into the plot, 
is captured by the bandit and tied to a 
railroad track in the fashion of old gay- 
nineties melodramas. She escapes in nick 
of time, kills the bandit and falls in 
love with a ranch hand in the closing 
sequences. 

Photography rates fair in this picture 
which is marked by considerable under- 
exposure. Editing is fair and titling of- 
fers much room for improvement. Chief 
titling fault is lack of clarity and incon- 
sistency in format, lettering and color 
of titles. 

Lesson to be learned by these filmers 
is that direction is most important in a 
picture of this kind. A better picture 
no doubt would have resulted had all 
directorial responsibility been placed in 
the hands of one and the camera work 
handled exclusively by the other. 



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Ask your dealer or write, stating your Filmo 
model. 

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lens shade and filter holder; Ameri- 
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PACE 24 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



8MM. 



KODACHROME 
TRAVEL FILMS 



16MM. 



SUPERB FILMS IN GLORIOUS COLOR 
"WAIKIKI HULA GIRLS." The real McCoy! You 
will be delighted. Projection length scene $1.00. Col- 
or sample, complete lists 10c In coin. Hundreds or 
fine film subjects ror grown-ups; for children. Color, 
black and white, silent or sound. .Also Castle. Holly- 
wood, Official Films 

"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS." Three lien Sens:, 
tional subjects, featuring stunning beauties as you 
'ike them, 

• PARTY RECORDS." Something new in snapp) 
adult entertainment. Stamp brings catalogues, 

FILMS EXCHANGED- Only firsl .lass subjects 
in i;ood condition accepted. Give details about your 
films. State subjects, types desired. SWAP your 200 
ft. Xmm film and $1.00; your 400 ft. 16mm. and 
$2.00; or your 100 ft. suuild film and $3.50 for an- 
other film. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

liAlA precision All-Metal (iinm. Film Slitter $2 75 
FOTOFADE DTE for making Chemical Fades .. 1.25 
FOTOFADF. WIPE-OFF TAPE, per roll. .CO 
CINETINTS. Set <i Colors with instructions... 3.25 

DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each .35 

HOME MOVIES. Hack Issues. 1037-38-39 IS 

Not all months in any year, 1040-41-42 30 
TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS— Each 

Double 8 50c Unlvex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS. Double 8mm. and Single 8 size. 10c 

100 ft. and 50 ft. 16mm 15c 

MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FIILM 
Speed 0 In. Pbotoflood Light. Laboratory Packed. 

Dbl. 8—33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; 400 ft. $5.50; 
Sgl. 8—33 ft. 45c; 100 ft. $1.00; 100 ft. $3.50; 
16mm. 100 ft. $1.25; 400 ft. $5.00. 
Clear. Purplehaze, Yellow, Red. Amber. Special Blue 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orders 
Cash. Check or M. O. for quick service. 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
oi credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



8mm. 

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1 6mm. 

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CONTINENTAL HOME 
MOVIE LIBRARY! 

1943 Catalogs Now Ready! 

Films for Rent and Sale. 
8mm. Catalog Sent FREE. 

Films for Rent and Sale. 
16mm. Catalog Sent FREE. 



Films for Rent and Sale. 
S. O. F. Catalog Sent FREE. 



Many exceptional 'buys' in new and 
used. Bought. Sold, exchanged. 
Monthly payments available. 



Cameras, projectors (Sound or Si- 
lent. All photo equipment repairs, 
replacements parts, etc. 

MOGULL'S TVlVv 

New York.N.Y. 
If It's Cinematic or Photographic 
— we have it 



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Rating Scheiner 18 
8mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

25 ft. Double 8, only, $1.25 
16mm Projection Reel — 200 ft. 
reel — 35c each. 
Minimum order 6 reels 
Write for prices for developing 
and processing for 8mm. and 
16mm. films bought elsewhere. 
VISUAL INSTRUCTION 
SUPPLY CORP. 
1757 Broadway. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dept. 12 



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Rating good averages in all but the 
titling is "The Magic Closet" by W. D. 
Garlock of Los Angeles. This picture 
filmed almost entirely indoors, runs 150 
ftet in 8mm. black and white. It is an 
amusing story of a movie amateur 
plagued with a wife who resents his 
too-frequent expenditure of the family 
funds for gadgets and accessories. 

There's a large closet in the home 
and the man has a way of "finding" 
new gadgets cached there. Whenever he 
w ants a splicer, or an exposure meter, 
etc., he goes out quietly and buys it and 
just as quietly returns home to "hide" 
it in his magic closet. He always sees to 
it that his wife is present whenever he 
is to "discover" another hidden gift in 
the magic closet. 

Suspicious, his wife investigates his 
check book, chances upon some bills, 
and thus discovers the source of the 



many surprises the magic closet has held 
for them. To retaliate, the wife goes 
shopping and when her husband returns 
home that evening she has packed the 
magic closet with surprises of her own 
choosing. Of course when husband 
opens the closet he finds it stocked with 
new dresses, shoes, a fur coat, and other 
things. His trick discovered, he agrees 
to turn over a new leaf — and his pay to 
his wife. 

Few home movies have matched 
the fine lighting of interiors and indoor 
photography of this picture. And there 
are some trick shots, double exposures, 
etc., to match the best of profession- 
als'. The story was well developed and 
the acting by the filmer and his wife as 
the man and wife respectively is cap- 
ably done. 

Improving the titling will do much 
to up the rating of this finely produced 
cineplay. 



cAmateur'i outlook /or '43 



• Continued from Page <? 

Photoflood reflectors, especially those 
of spun aluminum, have practically 
disappeared from the market. In their 
place may be found reflectors of light 
metal with the reflector surface finished 
in white or aluminum paint. 

On the processing front, film labor- 
atories are no longer able to render the 
usual peacetime service due to demands 
by government and producers of train- 
ing films. On the average, however, a 
roll of film left for processing Monday 
is ready for screening by end of the 
week. In some areas, Kodachrome re- 
quires more time. 

So far, restrictions, man power short- 
age, etc., have had little effect on the 
production of 8mm. and 16mm, films 
for home projectors. In spite of great- 
est demand in history, principal pro- 
ducers are keeping up with the demand 
and issuing new releases regularly. 

Tendency of amateur cine clubs is 
to pool film equipment in single club 
productions, rather than encouraging 
intermural competition, sustaining in- 
dividual member interest through as- 
signment of members to specific tasks 
on production staff. Tendency of this 
move thus far has been to weld mem- 
bership into a tighter unit with every 
member's interest centered on same sub- 
ject. This is a decided improvement over 
tendency in the past for clubs, especial- 
ly those of large membership, to sep- 
arate into cliques. 

On the whole, 1943 holds for the 
movie amateur a year of continued ac- 
tivity. With film to shoot in what spare 
time he will have to use it, in view of 
the greater effort each of us are now 
putting into our job, and with adequate 



other supplies available, production of 
new films by the average amateur will 
be balanced with greater activity in 
editing and titling and in more time 
given to projection of films. Table 
top photography, cinemicrography, and 
shooting titles will constitute a large 
measure of the amateur filmers' activi- 
ties in view of gasoline rationing and 
other limitations that make filming 
afield out of the question in some lo- 
calities for the duration. 

All and all, the average cinebug will 
be able to keep his camera sufficiently 
busy during 1943 so he'll not be 
"rusty" when the war is over and ama- 
teur movie making enters upon its 
greatest, most interesting era. 

cAirbru^lted 

• Continued from Page 12 

the card, gradually shading the design 
in a vignette effect. Repeating this pro- 
cess eight times, the complete "drawn 
curtain" design was produced. The 
straight line design on left side of this 
title card was produced in a similar 
manner except that the straight-edged 
pattern was used. 

Timely motifs may be introduced in- 
to home movie title backgrounds such 
as that shown in the second title card — 
"Christmas 1942." Here two patterns 
were cut from cardboard as before: one 
a solid design of a Christmas tree, the 
other a stencil of two bells. The tree 
design was produced by coating the en- 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PAGE 25 



HOLLYWOOD 



tire surface of the tree pattern with lead 
pencil graphite, then laying pattern 
over title card and rubbing off graphite 
onto title card with fingers as shown. 

The twin bell effect was created by 
coating the pattern stencil with lead 
pencil graphite, laying stencil over title 
card in proper position, then rubbing 
off graphite onto title card in the open 
area of stencil which constituted the 
bell design. Details of double bands and 
highlights were applied later by means 
of a pencil and eraser respectively. Af- 
ter all background designs were com- 
pleted, the title text was then lettered 
in india ink. 

Most important implement in mak- 
ing title card backgrounds in this man- 
ner is the right pencil — that is, one with 
an exceedingly soft lead and preferably 
a heavy lead — larger than the aver- 
age lead pencil. Also, the paper stock 



from which pattern is to be cut must 
not be smooth or glossy. On the con- 
trary, surface of pattern paper or card- 
board must be rough so it will accumu- 
laet sufficient pencil graphite to be 
transferred to the title card by the rub- 
bing-by-finger process already described. 

Another thing favorable about this 
idea is that it is applicable to title cards 
of any size — from small typewriter ti- 
tel cards to 9 by 12 inches or larger. It 
presents opportunity for any amateur 
to personalize his title making and give 
it individuality by including in his main 
and credit title backgrounds, designs in 
keeping with the theme of the picture. 
One does not have to be an artist to 
draw the patterns and cut them out. 
Any design illustration cut from a 
newspaper or magazine will serve as a 
pattern from which the title pattern 
may be produced. 



Lxpoiure for iucceii^ul titlei 



• Continued front Page 1J 

liance. It becomes necessary to shoot at 
a wider lens opening, of course, or to 
increase power of the photofloods. 

The results of these experiments have 
done much to correct the ills of title 
making for many amateurs who, hereto- 
fore, have kept their photofloods pretty 
close to the camera, pointed directly 
at the title. 

Definition as well as contrast is affect- 
ed by the volume of light falling upon 
the title card. If insufficient light is em- 
ployed, requiring the use of an exposure 
of f/3-J or f/4 in shooting the title, 
sharp focus cannot result in the letter- 
ing, especially if lettering is small. The 
text will not be sharp and will prove 
difficult to read on the screen. There- 
fore, enough light should be employed 
to enable filming title at an opening not 
wider than f/5.6. F/8 is probably the 
best exposure to use for all around good 
titling. The lens is not closed down too 
far so that a fadeout can still be made 
by closing down to f 16 where the fade- 
out effect is desired. 

The problem of determining correct 
exposure for title filming is really no 
problem at all. An exposure meter may 
be used for the purpose, but not in the 
usual manner of pointing meter at title 
card. Obviously, it would be difficult to 



TITLE TROUBLES 

vanish when you have a book that 
tells you how to do everything that 
makes for successful titles. Such a 
book is "How To Title Home Mov- 
ies,' written by Ceo. W. Cushman. 
Mailed prepaid for $1.00 by HOME 
MOVIES, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



obtain an accurate reading of a black 
title card with a single sentence in 
white. A low reading would result, 
causing overexposure. The recommend- 
ed method, for both black and white 
and color title filming, is to place a sheet 
of grey paper in front of the title card 
and take a reading from it. While there 
are a number of graduations of grey 
color, any difference will register only 
slightly on the exposure meter. And 
should such difference affect the final 
exposure, it will be so slight as to be un- 
noticeable. In subsequent title film- 
ing, the necessary allowance can be 
made in setting exposure. 

Where positive film is used for titles, 
the same practice as outlined above 
sohuld be followed for placement of 
lights and determining exposure. How- 
ever, "direct positive" titles require, 
even more than ever, that there be max- 
imum contrast between the title card 
and lettering. Here, color values are re- 
versed from those required in reversal 
film titles — the title card must be snow 
white and the ink jet black if a maxi- 
mum of contrast is to be obtained. 

Careful development of the film also 
enters into the problem of obtaining 
a contrasty title where positive film is 
used. This requires that a good contrasty 
developer be used in the strength and 
for the time recommended by the manu- 
facturer. Also, it often entails the need 
for shooting a short test strip in order 
to determine proper developing time 
as well as the right exposure. Readers 
interested further in this phase of posi- 
tive title production may refer to the 
article beginning on page 357 of the 
September 1942 issue which treats the 
subject at greater length. 





Black 4 White 
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Tinted or 
Kodachrome 



1 6 MM movies made more 
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Backgrounds to fit any 
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Chicago, III. 



MASTER TITLEER 

and 

TITLETTERS 

The perfect combination for perfect Titles, 
Trick and Effect Shots; Ultra Close-ups. Pro- 
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Prices, Including Excise Tax 

Titleer $11.21 Titletters $4.?5 

Auxiliary Lenses, 49c — Set 4, $3.45 

Accessories available for making all types of titles. 
Color or black and white. Size of Titletters, 
5 16* high. 

ORDER DIRECT 

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3227' 2 S. FIGUEROA ST. LOS ANGELES 



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Contains BIG NEW LIST 166 film subjects, glam- 
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today. Your name on postcard brings this handy 
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3827 Archer Ave. Dept. H-l Chicago 





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Distinctive TITLES 
and expert EDITING 

For the Amateur and Professional 
16mm — Slum 
Black & White, Tinted and Kodachrome 
Write for our new illustrated catalog 
STAHL EDITING * TITLING SERVICE 
33 West 42nd Street New York, N. Y. 



PROTECT FILMS 



MOV If S t *• R J- f f STILLS 

vapJOLrate 

ASK TOUR DEALER OR PHOTOFINISHER 
VAPORATECO.. INC.* BELL ft HOWELL CO 
130 W. 46th St. 1801 Larchmont. Chicago 
New Vork City 716 N. Labrea, Hollywood 



AGAINST 
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AND THE 
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WOOD PRO- 
DUCERS DO 



PACE 26 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



No. 7 8mm Duplicating 

QUIZ 

QUESTION: Does a duplicate print 
harm the original 8mm film in any way. 

Answer : No. Many copies may be made by com pet ant 
operators. 

QUESTION: Are 8mm. black-and-white (or monocolor) 
duplicates necessarily expensive? 

Answer: Not at all! $1.25 pays for a 50 ft. 8mm. b&w 
KCONOMY duplicate. Longer lengths computed at 
per foot. Monocolor and DeLuxe prints are slightly high- 
er ... 3^ and 4c per foot, respectively. 
QU EST I ON : Can damaged films with torn perforations 
be reclaimed? 

Answer: Certainly! ESO-S can duplicate almost any type 
of damaged film. An extra charge of 50£ Is made for 
handling such damaged films. 

O.U ESTION : How and where should films be sent for 
this duplicating service? 

Answer: Via insured parcel post to ESO-S PICTTJRES. 
3946 Central Street. Kansas City, Missouri. Include re- 
mittance With order, or, we will ship c.o.d. (Amounts 
sent in excePS of cost refunded. > 

QUESTION: Does ESO-S offer other services or products? 

Answer: Yes. Our spring catalog is yours for the asking! 

ESO-S PICTURES 



Scenario far indoor fainter* 



3945 Central St. 



KANSAS CITY. MO. 



WORLD'S 
GREATEST SHOW 
RENTAL LIBRARY 

NOW! You can see all of latest WAR 
and CURRENT EVENTS released by 
CASTLE and other producers, with 
our new ECONOMICAL RENTAL 
PLAN. Write for details. 

KENWOOD FILMS 

818 E. 47th St. Chicago, III. 



Kodachrome 



MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 
GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A Merchandise Mart, Chicago 



Complete Rental Library 

16mm. — Low Rates — 8mm. 

Send 10 Cents for NEW Catalogue 

BIGGER THAN EVER 

NATIONAL CINEMA SERVICE 

71 Dey St.. Hew York WOrth 2-6049 



I6MM. KODACHROME 

"END" titles: 3 for $1.00. With fadeout. 50c each. 
"YOSEMITE" and "BLOOMING DESERT," each 
100 ft.. $18.00; 200 ft.. $36.00. "THE CANADIAN 
ROCKIES." 400 ft. (dupel. $60.00. 
ROBINS* nest sequence, 34 feet. $5.00. KODA- 
SL1DES, 50c each, of above subjects and others. 

GUY D. HASELTON 

7936 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood. Calif. 



Notice to Movie Fans 

If you take movies (8mm or 16mm) you simply cannot 
afford to be without a Free copy of the latest Photo Bar- 
gain Bonk now being distributed throughout the U. S. 
Lists all the best moving picture equipment from all 
the leading manufacturers, describes them. The prices 
save you money in many cases. You'll And the latest 
In lenses, screens, meters, projectors, cameras, film, 
titters, editing outfits, tripods, books on editing, 
titling, etc. This Bargain Book la Invaluable to you as 
an equipment REFERENCE book. Don*t wait a day 
longer to send for your Froe copy. Write us now. 

CENTRAL CAMERA COMPANY 
23.0 S. Wabash Dept. A-9 Chicago, Illinois 




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Film Titles 

Photo titles, stationery, greeting 
cards, bookplates, advertising. 
Easy rales furnished. Junior 
Outfits 18.25 op. Senior $17 up. 
Print lor Others, Ble Profits. Sold 
direct from factory only. Writ* for 
freo eataloaand all details. Kelse-y 
Presses, W-94, Merlden, Conn 



• Continued from Page i) 

intent upon music before him. Starts 
to run over piano keys. 

Scene 15. Med. closeup. Interior of 
bathroom. Child drying hands. Hangs 
up towel and exits from scene. 

Scene 16. Same camera position as 
scene 12. Child, beaming, re-enters 
room. Camera follows as he rejoins 
teacher on piano bench. 

Scene 17. Same as scene 11. Child 
starts to play. Teacher beats time wi th 
hand. 

Scene 18. Closeup of teacher's foot 
tapping. Foot suddenly stops in de- 
termined manner. 

Scene 19. Back to scene 17. Teach- 
er, exasperated, looks at child, bangs 
hand on piano and says: "No! No! 
NO! Child winces. 

Scene 20. Medium closeup. Same ac- 
tion as above. Teacher reaches over for 
hands of child, places them on other 
keys. Child reluctantly begins to play 
again. 

Scene 21. Closeup of teacher. He 
grimmaces at child's mistakes. Puts 
hands to ears in disapproval. 

Scene 22. Closeup of dog howling. 

Scene 23. Medium closeup of maid 
in kitchen peeling potatoes; indicates 
she's annoyed at piano playing. Sudden- 
ly drops knife and places hands over 
ears. 

Scene 24. Closeup of canary in cage 
fluttering about in annoyance. 

Scene 25. Closeup of teacher with 
angry expression. 

Scene 26. Closeup of hands. Teach- 
ar's hands grip child's hands and places 
them on right keys again. 

Sce'ne 27. Closeup of child's face 
showing him about to cry, or already 
crying, if you prefer. 

Scene 28. Medium shot of child and 
teacher (same as scene 19). Teacher 
explains, with restrained calm, where 
hands should go. Gets interested in 
piece, starts playing it himself. 

Scene 29. Closeup of child's face. 
He watches teacher's face (out of 
scene). Suddenly gets idea. Looks out of 
scene, then back toward teacher. 

Scene 30. Same as scene 28. Child 
slides quietly off bench, tip-toes out 
of scene. 

Scene 31. Medium shot. Child picks 
up ball and bat, looks back apprehen- 
sively toward teacher, then exits quietly. 

Scene 32. Medium shot. Child ex- 
iting from house. Door closes behind 
him. 

Scene 33. Back to scene 30. Teacher 
playing piano, oblivious of child's es- 
cape. He sways as he plays. 

Scene 34. Flashback to canary in 
cage — now singing. 



Scene 35. Closeup — rear of dog — 
showing tail wagging. 

Scene 36. Brief flashback to maid — 
now smiling and swaying gently to 
strains of music. 

Scene 37. Back to scene 33. Teacher 
playing piano, oblivious to everything 
around him. 

Scene 38. Exterior. Street scene. 
Boys playing. Child with bat and ball 
comes running into scene, greets play- 
mates, throws ball to one of them. 

Scene 39. Back to scene 37. Teacher 
playing piano. Looks casually beside 
him. Stops playing abruptly as he finds 
child gone. Looks chagrined, calls to 
child. Receiving no answer, he puts on 
hat, picks up music haughitly, and ex- 
its in a huff. Fade out. 

THE END 

Note that by employing closeups as 
indicated, a great deal of acting on the 
part of teacher and child is eliminated 
which is desirable in view of the diffi- 
culty in securing adequate acting re- 
sponse from amateurs. 

Here's a suggestion, too, for a little 
different wind-up of the story, although 
it will involve a few sub titles. Where 
it is desired to indicate mother in the 
script, introduce her in the early scenes 
showing the teacher arriving to give the 
lesson. Then, when the teacher is play- 
ing the piano after the child has sneaked 
out to play, show a neighbor listening 
to the piano playing, then calling the 
child's mother to compliment her on 
the child's playing. Just as the mother, 
elated over the compliment, hangs up 
the telephone, she chances to look out 
the window, see's the child playing in 
the street. She throws open the window 
and shouts: "Junior!!" as the picture 
ends in a fadeout. 



Slue 
photofloodi . . • 

• Continued from Page 16 

though at some sacrifice of having to 
increase exposure. 

As a rule, the color temperature of a 
new photoflood will be somewhat great- 
er than its rated value. Then its color 
temperature gradually decreases with 
age to a point below rated efficiency. 
This deficiency can be retarded some- 
what by including in the current line 
a dimming device that permits photo- 
floods to burn at reduced voltage be- 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PACE 27 



tween takes and new camera set ups. 

On the subject of using blue photo- 
floods exclusively on interiors for the 
purpose of shooting with outdoor Ko- 
dachrome, it may be seen that in view 
of the lower color temperature of these 
lamps, the illumination does not ap- 
proximate natural daylight and there- 
fore there can be no advantage gained 
with this combination over that of type 
A Kodachrome and white photofloods. 
If regular Kodachrome must be used in- 



doors, the regular Weston Mazda rating 
of 3 for Kodachrome with filters would 
apply. Use of blue photofloods would 
require slight increase in exposure over 
that required for white photofloods 
with the Kodachrome filter in use. Us- 
ing the Weston mazda rating of 3, as 
established for use of regular Koda- 
chrome indoors, will produce the cor- 
rect exposure meter reading regardless 
of whether blue or white photofloods 
are used. 



cAmateur Aound film . . . 



• Continued from Page 1 1 

pick up one of the magazines. The cam- 
era zooms forward to take in the cover 
photo, bearing the caption: "Mary, the 
girl of the week." Pictured at her desk 
is Mary, a stenographer. 

The picture comes to life and the 
commentator says: "Mary has been 
working her fingers to the bone." A 
dissolve shows a pair of skeleton hands 
replacing Mary's on the typewriter 
keys. Her employer, observing her 
working too hard, gives her a check and 
tells her to take a vacation and "see the 
world through rose colored glasses." 
Here Mary dons a pair of rose-colored 
glasses bearing the picture of a rose on 
each lens. 

Space does not permit relating each 
sequence and describing how all of the 
colloquialisms were enacted. Several in- 
cidents taxed the producer's ingenuity 
as when he had to picture the state- 
ment: "She hit the ceiling!" after the 
bridegroom reveals his past. The girl 
appears, in a piece of magic action, to 
rise up from her bed and actually hit 
the ceiling — hard! The picture goes on 
to show the couple "getting hitched" 
after "losing their heads." The scene 
shows the headless couple hitched to a 
wagon like a team of horses. They stop 
at a roadside where a preacher performs 
the ceremony, and then proceed down 
the road. 

This scene presented a problem for 
the producer which was successfully 
surmounted. In the preceding scene, the 
couple are shown "losing their heads" 
at a cocktail bar — a bit of action that 
required some trick camera work. 
However, the same cinematic trick 
could not be employed for the long 
shot just described. It was then found 
that by lowering the camera level and 
having the boy and girl bend their heads 
far forward, and with their backs to 
the camera, the illusion of headless 
bodies was created. 

Producer of "Cine Whimsey" is Rob- 
ert Fels, a native of Paris and now a 
business economist of New York City. 
Business requires that he spend some 
time in California and it was while on 



one of these sojourns last summer that 
he induced a couple of brother cine am- 
ateurs to undertake production of the 
picture. Norman Johnson of Los An- 
geles collaborated with Fels on the script 
adapted from an original story idea by 
Fels. Newell Tune of Glendale, Califor- 
nia, handled the photography, using 
negative film, and he is responsible for 
the smooth execution of the multitude 
of trick camera effects which the script 
1 f Fels and Johnson demanded. 

After the film was completely edited, 
it was taken to a film recording studio, 
^^ith a selection of phonograph records, 
an amateur commentator, and the orig- 
inal cast of Mary and her boy friend, 
the narration, sound effects, music and 
dialogue were recorded in synchroniza- 
tion with the screened action. The sound 
track was then combined with the neg- 
ative in producing the final print. The 
entire recording job, exclusive of film, 
cost but $72.50. A surprisingly good 
overall job has resulted and this effort 
certainly shows the way for similar ac- 
tivity on the part of other amateurs 
who may be fortunate in having access 
to the facilities for post recording. 

With gasoline rationing tending to 
confine movie making indoors, it is 
not difficult to imagine other amateurs 
turning to this type of picture making, 
gaining the valuable experience in post- 
recording of sound and dialogue that is 
certain to play a big part in post-war 
amateur movies. 



Cditlng, 



(Board . 



• Continue J from Page 1 5 

remove the film from the gate, chang- 
ing the upper reel over to the left re- 
w : nd B. The film will then pass over 
splicer, emulsion side up in correct po- 
sition for splicing. 

Final task is applying the finish. All 
wooden parts — base, uprights, blocks, 
etc. — should be given two coats of var- 
nish. A piece of thick felt or sponge 




I work on the 
good old "re- 
tention of vision" principle 
. . . I tell 'em over and over again until it's 
indelibly inscribed in their memory that "BASS 
PAYS HIGHEST CASH PRICES FOR YOUR 
USED EOUIPMENT." Send it on for a "check 
by return mail." 

Charles Bass 

President 

Lucky me; I've got TWO (2) MOVIKON It's 
with all the doodads, coupled range finder, 
Sonnar F: 1 .4 lens, carrying case, 3 filters com- 
pletely reconditioned, fully guaranteed, price 

each $345.00 

ALSO CINE KODAK SPECIALS, FILMO CAM- 
ERAS AND PROJECTORS, BOLEX AND REVERE. 

Write Dept. H M 




fVfRV 8MM. FAN WANTS 

CINE EXTENAR 

It's the new WIDE ANGLE 
lens that every cine fan 
needs to catch the whole 
picture. Simply screws 
over regular 8mm. lens, 
providing identical focus 
and definition plus a WIDE 
ANGLE. $27.50 
For full particulars, write today 

CAMERA SPECIALTY CO. 

48 West 29th Street New York City 




Sensational 
GLAMOUR NEWSREELS 

New - Different 

Also, thrilling beautiful Kodachrome subjects in 
8 and 16mm. Lists, color sample, dime, or 4 ft. 
color test scene from "Waikiki Hula," $1.00. 

HAROLD F. JENKINS 392 S. Elmira. N. Y. 



PB MOVIE FILTER KIT FOR COLORFILM 
FOR REVERE CAMERAS 

Including I Screw-in-Sunshade, I Haie Filter, 
I Type A Filter, I Pouch, ^ 75 

complete - * 

From All Leading Camera Dealer* or 

PONDER & BEST 

1015 SO. GRAND AVE.. LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 



inPHOTOSOR 6 

* VoF GHOST TOWN 

MOST UNIQUE SPOT IN SO. CALIFORNIA 

GHOST TOWN 'PITCHUR GALLERY* 

LOCATED AT KNOTT8" BERRY PLACE 
• UEN A PARK. CALIFORNIA 



TAKE THIS PROVEN SHORTCUT 

TO SUCCESSFUL PHOTOGRAPHY 



Enroll now at country's largest, best equipped 
school. Profit by our 33 years of experience in 
training men and women for photographic suc- 
cess. Individual coaching by experts, for Com- 
mercial. News. Portrait. Motion Picture. Color Pho- 
togranhy. Resident or h^roe study. Free booklet. 

N. Y. INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
Dent. 114. 10 West 33 Street. New York. N. Y. 




PACE 28 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



Ch/lMllU FOR SLIDES 





a Friend or Yourself 

Blue, green, maroon or black. 



A Real Gift for 

Bookshelf size 8'/ 2 x 7". 
Contents book included. 

No. 100 (illustrated) has divisions for 51 slides. 
No. I00B holds up to 300 slides. 

At Stores or direct prepaid CI AA 
en 10 Days Money-Back Trial ^ 
Free Catalog of Amfiles for Reels. Negatives, etc 



AMBERG FILE & INDEX CO. aSUSMS; 



At Your Favorite Camera Store ~^£S^m 

°M&UxA "VICTORY" ! 
No Metal REEL FILES 

3 Volume De Luxe Library Series, j 
holds 18 200-ft., 8-mm reels. Black ■ 
or brown carrying case with swivel 
hinge front cover. Dustproof. Re- 
movable index. Complete with 18plas 
tic reels and case, S 16.75; without reels, 
$10. Individual Files hold 6 200-ft., 
8-mm reels. Complete with 6 plastic 
reels, $4.75 ; without reels, $2.50. 

Write for descriptive circular 
WESTERN MOVIE SUPPLY CO. 
254 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 




8mm. 



16mm. Ambertint Film 



AMBERTINT is a fine grain semi-ortho film — derives its 

name from the slight AMBER tint in the film. 
Has more speed than necessary for most outdoor shots. 

100 ft. 16mm. $2.50 25 ft. 8mm. $1 .25 

HOLLYWOODLAND STUDIOS 



9320 California Ave. 



South Gate. Calif. 



Reversible Film, 100 Ft. $2.00 

8mm. Double, 25 Ft $1.00 

PRICES INCLUDE PROCESSING 

Silly Symphonies, Charlie Chaplin and other 
features at 14? per foot for complete subject. 
Write today for our catalogue of finished subjects. 

STAR SAFETY FILM 

836 Ninth Ave. Film Cent»r Bldg.. N. Y. C. 



8 ENLARGED f f% 
TO lb 



REDUCED 

TO 



8 



Black and White and Kodachrome 
CEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Uoaon Picture Printing 
995-A MERCHANDISE MART 
CHICAGO 



'Atol'MovieTitle MakirM 
is Easy-Let Out FREE IS 
'tryit/oursglf V$±Sho(v}buJ 

WRITE • A-to-Z MOVIE ACCESSORIES 

175 Fifth Avenue Dept. H45 New York. N. Y. 



rubber should be cemented under each 
corner of the board to provide cushion- 
ing and prevent scratching of table tops. 

Built carefully, this editor will give 
satisfactory service. It will not provide 
action in the viewer image, of course, 
but that isn't altogether necessary. More 
important is fact it provides an enlarged 
image, large enough to give good detail, 
and that seems to be the main thing 
most amateurs look for in a viewer. 

T)ke dreader 

Speak* . . . 

• Continued from Page 6 

service for Reel Fellows or other movie 
makers who are willing to use their cam- 
eras, volunteering to make movies of 
these boys and girls to be sent to their 
home folks. Illustration: John Doe's son 
is at Camp Blanding here in Florida. 
Doe reads this announcement, so he 
sends his son a roll of film, asks him to 
contact me in Jacksonville. I shoot the 
pictures and notify processing station 
to send the films direct to John Doe. 
Those volunteering their services, of 
course, must be sure to list film size. 
Mine's 8mm. — Milo Jones, 410 W. 20th 
St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Jin forma Hon 

Please . . . 

• Continued from Page 4 

performed before or after exposure. 
Peak period of increased sensitivity is 
quite short; therefore, film should be 
hypersensitized just before film is to be 
used. 

Rubber Cement (R. B. Barton, Tulsa, 
Okla.) 

Q. At last, all the rubber cement 
seems to be off the market and I am 
now without a suitable adhesive for 
use with my block title letters. Do you 
know of any substitute — a cement that 
has the same qualities of rubber cement} 

A. We know of no substitute avail- 
able at this time. The rubber shortage 
has naturally affected the supply of 
rubber cement. However there are two 
sources of this adhesive still available in 
many localities: tire repair kits and the 
rubber half -sole shoe repair kits avail- 
able at most dime stores. Both kits con- 
tain tubes of rubber cement. 




FOR ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS! 

* Harrison CINE KIT 




4 FILTERS and DUAL-SNAP SHADE TO MEET 
ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS— both Kodachrome 
and Black and White. 

The new Harrison CINEKIT contains a special Aero 

Lock Ring, a Dual-Snap Aluminum Sunshade, and the 
following de luie Duraline Filters: YL-6. GY-4. 
RD-4. and GR-4. Case is of durable 5-oz. Elkhlde, 
felt lined. $6.95 and up. 



(If desired, Kodachrome users 
may substitute a C-4 and 
HAZE filter for any two of 

the above. 



Write for Free 
Illustrated FoldM 
Today 



HARRISON & HARRISON 

OPTICAL ENGINEERS 
8351 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 




BUILD IT YOURSELF 

That gadget you've been 
wanting — sunshade, filter 
holder, fading device or cam- 
era dolly — you can easily 
build yourself. You don't have 
to be a mechanic; as long as 
you can use a few simple tools 
you can make any of the gad- 
gets illustrated and described 
in this fascinating book of 
Home Movie Gadgets. Mak- 
ing one gadget will more than 
repay price of book. 

$1.00 

POSTP A I D 

HOME MO V I ES 

6060 Sunset Blvd. 
HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 



RENT A FILM 

+ SEND FOR FREE LIST 

ESSCO FILM PRODUCTS 
3827 ARCHER AVE., CHICAGO 



HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 



PAGE 29 



TITLE trouble* 



■ y CIORCE W. CUSHMAN 

If you have any questions pertaining to titles or 
title-making, Mr. Cushman will be glad to answer them. 
Address him in care of Home Movies or his residence, 504 
Stanton Avenue, Ames, Iowa. In explaining your title 
troubles, include information such as type of equipment 
used, film, light source, and where possible, send along a 
sample of the title film. Enclose a self-addressed stamped 
envelope if you wish an early reply. 

Q. / wish to use one of the lenses from an old pair of 
spectacles as an auxiliary lens for my titlcr. How can I de- 
termine the diopter rating of such a lens? — E.T.G., Bronx, 
New York. 

A. Find the focal length of lens and divide 40 by the 
figure obtained. Thus, if focal length is 10 inches, diopter 
rating is 4. To deternrne focal length, hold leens before a 
sheet of white paper so it will project upon paper the image 
of a scene about 100 yards away. When image on paper is 
in sharp focus, measure distance between lens and paper. 
Result gives focal length. 

Flowever, unless your lens is a simple plano convex or 
concave-convex clement, it is not recommended for titler 
use. 

Q. The titles regularly printed on this page arc too small 
to fit title area of my titlcr. Will using a different auxiliary 
lens before the samcra enable me to reduce size of field and 
thus take in title exactly as it is? — M. K., College Station, 
Texas. 

A. Yes, but it will also be necessary to move your title 
closer to the camera. If you use a different auxiliary lens, 
it will provide for either longer or shorter focusing dis- 
tance. For example, say your titler provides shooting titles 
10" f'om camera. It is fitted with a 4 diopter lens. Movie 
the title to a point 8" from the camera and replace the 4 
diopter auxiliary lens with one of 5 diopters. 

Q. Why is it that use of shims or extension tubes with a 
lens requires an increase of exposure over normal, yet aux- 
iliary lenses, which accomplish the same purpose, do not? 
—D. H. T., Tampa, Via. 

A. To be technically correct, the use of shims or exten- 
sion tubes does not alter exposure. Moving a lens away from 
the film plane reduces its speed and therefore changes its 
f value. For complete explanation of this, see W. E. Cly- 
mas' article on Extension Tubes on page 3 1 1 of the August 
1942 issue. 

Q. / follow your articles on titling regularly but hai r 
not as yet read anything on the subject of punctuation of 
titles. — S. G. Deni er, Colo. 

A. Where a sub title is a complete sentence, as it should 
be, it should be marked by ordinary punctuation with 
periods, commas, etc., as found in every day writing of 
English. 



TITLES 



By EDMUND TURNER 



SEKlES 





PACE 30 HOME MOVIES FOR JANUARY 

CLASSIFIED • ADVERTISING 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: A Happy New Year and a Speedy 
Victory. 

USED CAMERAS 
8mm. Cine Kodak Model 20, F:3.5 lens. $24.50. 
8mm. Bell & Howell Companion Double 8. F:3.5 
lens. $37.50. 

8mm. Bell & Howell Sportster, Cooke F:2.5. combi- 
nation case, $62.50. 

8mm. Revere Model 99 Turret, with 12.5mm. Wol- 
lensak F:l.9 in focusing mount. $87.50. 

8mm. Movikon, F:2 Sonnar lens and case. $130.00. 

16mm. Kesytone A-7, I" F:2.7 fixed focus. $39.50. 

16mm. Cine Kodak Model B, F:l.9 lens, $49.50. 

16mm. Bell & Howell Filmo 75. Cooke. F:2.7 and 
case. $57.50. 

16mm. Cine Kodak Model A, hand crank, specially 
fitted with 400 ft. 16mm. special magazine mount- 
ed externally, with F:3.5 lens. $77.50. 

16mm. Cine Kodak Magazine with F:l.9 lens, $92.50. 

16mm. Filmo 70E, four speed, with Cooke F:2.7 and 
case, $107.50. 

16mm. Bell & Howell 141 Magazine, with I" Lumax 
F:l.9 focusing mount. $117.50. 

16mm. Bolex, new Model. 15mm. Goerz Hypar 
F:2.7, I" Wollensak F:l.5 and 3' Wollensak F:4, 
all in focusing mounts, with case. $327.50. 

16mm. Bell & Howell Filmo 70DA, frame counter 
and hand crank, 15mm. F:2.7 fixed focus. I" F:l.5 
and 3" F:4 Wollensak lenses. $275.00. 

16mm. Bell & Howell Filmo 70DA, with single ex- 
posure release, black finish, I" F:l.5, 17mm. F:2.7 
and 3" F:4 Wollensak lenses, with case, $335.00. 

16mm. Bell & Howell Filmo 70DA, brown finish, 
frame counter, hand crank and 1 10 v. motor, with 
17mm. F:2.7, I" F:l.5 Wollensak lenses and 2" 
Acura F:2.8, $405.00. 

Itmm. Cine Kodak Special. 1.9 lens, magazine and 
masks, new condition, $328.00. 

16mm. Cine Kodak Special, latest model, I" F:l.9 
lens, 200 ft. magazine, with Berndt-Maurer opti- 
cal parallax finder and Leitz range finder, com- 
plete $725.00. 

LENSES 

Hard-to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focal lengths 
up to 6" including Cooke. Hugo Meyer, Dallmeyer 
and complete stock of new Wollensak Lenses from 
wide angle to 6". Write for quotations. 
USED PROJECTORS 

16mm. reconditioned Bell & Howell Model 57, 400 
watt lamp, 2" lens and case, $67.50. 

16mm. Bell & Howell Model ST, 750 w. F:l.6 lens. 
$1 15.00.0 

16mm. Keystone Model A-81. 750 watt lamp, F:l.6 
lens, $64.50. 

16mm. Keystone Model C-16. 200 watt. $22.50. 

16mm. Kodascope C, 100 watt and case, $14.50. 

IN STOCK— Ample supply of new Bell & Howell 
Filmomasters and case, $169.60. Also Ampro KD, 
750 watt lamp, with case. $160.00. New Filmo- 
matsers 8 and 16mm., Revere Deluxe, Keystone 
A-82. Cine Magazine 8 and 16mm., Filmo Auto- 
loads and Automaster models. Bell & Howell di- 
rect focuser for Autoload or Automaster, $20.55. 
Ouick Set Jr. Cine Tripod, $20.00. 

We buy 'em, sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 
stocks of new Cine Equipment, all makes. Send 
for Bass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment 
up to date. 

BASS Camera Company, Dept. HC, 179 W. Madison 
St., Chicago. Illinois. 



• MOVIE Library — 8mm., 16mm., 35mm., religious, 
educational, sports, comedies, travel. Request cat- 
alogs. Cameras, projectors — buy. sell, exchange. 
Time payments. MOGULLS (Established 1914), 5S 
West 48th, New York. 



• MODEL J Eastman projector with case. $28.00. 
Model B Eastman movie camera $17.00. Both in ex- 
cellent condition. H. E. DUNN, 562 Lawndale Court, 
Holland, Mich. 



WANTED 



• SOUND proiectors, 16mm. Cine Specials, Lenses. 
Extra 100-200 foot magazines, good silents, 8-l6mm. 
projectors. KENCHAL. 271 Madison Ave.. West 
Hempstead. New York. 



• MODEL K Eastman and tripod, also need wide 
argle and telephoto lenses for Cine Special. PAUL 
BRADLEY, 3721 North LaSalle St.. Indianapolis, Ind. 



• CINE Special time-lapse outfit consisting of 
electric release, electric release control and inter- 
val timer — new and used. Will pay top price. Wire 
or write DAVID KOTLEN, 627 Westminister St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 



• WANTED— 15mm. Hugo Meyer Plasmat f/1.5 
lens or 15mm. Dallmeyer f/1.5 lens mounted for 
limm. camera. Contact SCIENTIFIC FILMS, INC.. 
6052 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



• Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 

Turn it into cash with a Home Movies 

classified ad! 

RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing date, 
I Oth of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



WANTED 

• ESO-S will trade merchandise for your old 50 ft. 
and 30 ft. 8mm. projection reels. Mail them to us 
tcday! We'll return credit memorandum and latest 
catalog! ESO-S, 3945 Central, K. C, Mo. 



• WILL pay highest prices for 8mm-l6mm. sound- 
silent projectors, cameras and film. What have 
you? ZENITH. 308 West 44th St.. New York City. 



• WE BUY and sell I6rr.m. sound equipment. Fea- 
tures $5.00 per reel. Shorts $4.00 up. Lists. MULTI- 
PRISES, Box 1125, Waterbury, Conn. 

• WANTED — used equipment. Bargain list on 
request. PETERS. 41-B So. 4th St., Allentown, Penna. 

TITLING 

• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit — Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16", 18", 20" 24", 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal for 
general close-up photography. Complete kit $3.00. 
Separate lenses, 60c each. Also available in 6", 8" 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra-closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO., 3221 So. 
Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



• TITLING LETTERS that give you professional 
results. Pin letter and sanded back letters. Com- 
p'ete sets available $4.75 up. Write for descriptive 
literature. Ask about Santa Claus, Turkey and other 
title illustros. Big variety of large size and varied 
style letters can be purchased by the letter to fill 
ali titling needs. MITTENS LETTER CO., Redlands, 
Calif. 



FILMS FOR EXCHANGE 

• EXCHANGE: silent c'c'.'cs $1.00 reel; sound. 
$2.00. Also sell. Free catalogue. Selected sound 
programs, reasonable rentals. BETTER FILMS, 742 
New Lots Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BACK NUMBERS 
of 

HOME MOVI ES 

If you are a new subscriber or, 
perhaps, an "off and on" news- 
stand buyer of HOME MOVIES 
you'll probably want certain back 
issues containing information or 
plans for movie making or cine 
gadgets. The following issues are 
still available at no increase in 
prices : 

1940 — May, Oct., Nov. & Dec. 

1941 — Mar., Apr., May, June, 
July, Aug., Sept., Oct., 
Nov. and Dec. 

1942 — All issues except Feb. 
and April. 

25c 

PER COPY— POSTPAID 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



FILM RELEASES 



• GOOD USED 16mm. Sound Prints complete 
one reel subjects. "Japs Bomb U. S. A." $4.95: 
"Bombing of Pearl Harbor" $7.50; "America's Call 
to Arms" $7.50; "Britain's Commandos in Action" 
$9.95; "MacArthur, Americas First Soldier" $9.95- 
"Newsthrills of 1941, Vol. One" $6.00; "Newsthrills 
o. 1941, Vol. Two" $6.00; "News Parade of 1941" 
$7.50; "Our First Line of Defense" $7.50; "Russia 
Fights Hitler" $9.95; "U. S. Navy Blasts Marshall 
Islands" $9.95. Postpaid in U. S. A. BLACKHAWK 
FILM, Davenport, Iowa. 



• 8 AND I6MM. Film Subjects— black and white 
color — sound or silent. Largest selection ever com- 
piled, 65c to $200.00. Write for new, DeLuxe cata- 
log, profusely illustrated. 25c (coin or stamps) — 
refunded first purchase. HOLLYWOOD MOVIE 
SUPPLY CO., Box 870, Hollywood, Calif. 



• EXCHANGE your 16mm. full subjects used or 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm. -16mm. subjects, 
cartoons, cor-edies. ABBE, 1265 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



• MONEYMAKER! "The Worlds Greatest Passion 
Play." 16mm. and 35mm. Specify sound or silent. 
Rent or purchase. Superior than Oberammergau- 
play. HEMENWAY FILM CO., 33-A Melrose St.. 
Boston, Mass. 



• 8-I6MM. SILENT and sound films. Cameras and 
proiectors. Bought, sold, traded. Free Lists, BOBS 
154 East 47th St., N. Y. C. 



• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged, bought 
sold, rented. Bargains always. New Free lists. 
FRANK LANE, 5 Little Bldg., Boston. Mass. 



• COMPLETE 16mm. sound subjects, $1.00— need 
splicing. All sizes film bought, sold, exchanged. 
Catalogue, sample film 10c. INTERN ATI ON AL-H, 
2120 Strauss, Brooklyn. N. Y. 



• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New. used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins. RIEDEL FILMS 
Dept. HM-143. 3207 Joslyn Rd.. Cleveland, Ohio. 



• 8MM.-I6MM. silent, sound films — all major oro- 
ducers. Rent films on yearly plan, three large 
rolls $1.25, postpaid. COLLIER PHOTO SALES. 
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• I6MM. SOUND Features $5.00 cer reel. Shorts 
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Lists. MULTIPRI1SES Box 1125. Wajterbufy, Conn. 

• S^LE — Rental — Exc k ange: Lates* film releases. AH 
purchases guaranteed. Send stamp for free cata- 
logues. BA'lLEY FILMS. 1651 Cosmo. Hollywood. 
Calif. 



KODACHROME FILM RELEASES 

• KODACHROME Travel Films— lates* releases 
now available for distribution in 8 and 16mm. Dime 
will bring color sample and listings. KENWOOD 
FILMS. 818 E. 47th St.. Chicago. III. 



• KODACHROME movies for grownups. Lists, sam- 
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FILMS 



• 8MM-I6MM. film, including processing, daylight 
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• HALF-a-dozen rolls of Univex single 8mm. film 
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• STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have a model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
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postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATI IONS. 6060 Sunset 
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ever bought 
so much! 

NEVER WAS so much vital information on the subject of title making packed into one single 
volume. Edited and compiled by George W. Cushman, "How To Title Home Movies" is a hand- 
book for beginner and advanced amateur alike, treating all phases of the subject in simple under- 
standable language. 



Here are just some of the sub- 
jects covered by this valuable 
title book: Composing the title 
. . . selecting title backgrounds 
. . . choosing proper type face 
. . . how to make positive titles 
. . . trick and effect titles . . . 
animation . . . how to make 
the "perfect" home titler. 
100 pages jam-packed with 
all the information you 
need to make good attrac- 
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Order your copy today — 



*1 



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HOME 
MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood. Calif. 




AIRPLANES MADE TO FLY FASTER and at greater heights present new problems to lens designers. Kodak's 
new glass, with a much higher refractive index (light-bending ability) than previously available in op- 
tical glass of the same dispersion, is now being applied to aerial lenses and is partly responsible for the 
effectiveness of our aerial photography. The new lens now in use has twice the speed of the fastest lens 
previously used by our Army Air Force. 



The position of the pencil's imac 

shows that Kodak's new glass (belov 
has greater light-bending power tha 
old-type optical glass (above). The* 
two blocks have the same dispersioi 



11® 




ft. 



ill 



aerial lenses, ma 



de with 



new rare-e 



- first basic discovery in 55 



Sand has always been a basic ingredi- 
ent of optical glass. Now, for the first 
time. Kodak is making optical glass of 
"rare elements" — tantalum, tungsten, 
and lanthanum. No sand — to the op- 
tical scientist, it's ' almost as revolu- 
tionary as discovering how to make 
steel without iron." 

There would be no point in it, of 
course, without the result which is ob- 
tained: A lens which gives greater speed 
without loss of definition and covering 
power. 

The U. S. flyer equipped with an 
aerial lens made by Kodak, incorporat- 
ing the new glass, can carry out his 
mission from a safer height — and, as a 



years 



a much better 
>ark hi? pictures. 



consequence, with 
chance of bringing 

Faster, Fartbej; Clearer 

Before this, the fastest lens used by U. S. 
Armv flyers was fi3.5. Now our night 
flyers are being supplied, as rapidly as 
possible, with an //'2.5 lens. This is twice 
as fast, and gets pictures of better qual- 
ity — with the same size flash bomb — at 
a greater height. 

The greater light-bending ability of 
the new glass means that the lens can 
have less curvature — thus much better 
definition at the edges of the picture. 



lement gl 



ass, 



Prior to Kodak's new glass, in 1941, 
the last basic discovery leading to radi- 
cal improvement in optical glass was in 
1886. 

After the original work on the new 
glass, done by Kodak scientists in col- 
laboration with Dr. G. W. Morey. of 
the U. S. Geophysical Laboratory, four 
additional years were spent in perfect- 
ing its manufacture — and computing 
the new formulas necessary for the 
grinding of lenses. 

Fortunately the work was done in 
time, and the new optical elements are 
now in many cameras in the service of 
democracv . . . Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany, Rochester, N. \. 



Serving 



Luman progress through Photography 



YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $2.50 




*5M 




Harold M. Lambert 



February • 1943 

LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY AMATEUR MOVIE MAGAZINE! 





8 




16 

mm. 



"BOSKO" 

BOSKO AND BRUNO, long favorites with theatre audi- 
ences are now available in Hollywood Home Movie films. 
Here are cartoon films entertaining to old and young 
alike. Start your library today with a selection from this 
partial list: 

Bosko's Circus Fleas 1801 -A 

Bosk o j Bear Escape 1 804- A 

Bosko's Spooks 1 8 05- A 

Bosko's Bad Dream 1807-A 

Bosko's Cannibal Capers 1 809- A 

100 Ft. 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. 8mm 1.50 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE! 



TOPS— 

in home movie 
entertainment! 




WALT DISNEY animated cartoons lead the field in 
home entertainment films everywhere. Donald Duck, 
Goofy, Mickey Mouse and all the other famous Disney 
cartoon characters star in Hollywood Home Movie films 
available for home projectors. Listed below are just a few 
of the Disney subjects now available at attractive prices: 

Donald The Auro Mechanic 91 3- A 

The Smoke Eater 1555-A 

The Rescue 1 5 56- A 

Donald's Ice Capers 1559-A 

Donald Down Mexico Way 1 563- A 

100 Ft. 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. 8mm 1.50 



// Not Available From Your Dealer . . . Please Write 



HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 

6060 SUNSET BOULEVARD * HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 




ed as Second-Class Matter, May 6, 1938, at 
Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 

Act of March 3, 1879. 
:'iption rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
:s 25c. Adverising rates on application. 




. /?o me 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Copyright 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen 
Publications, Hollywood, Calif. No part of magazine 
may be reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1943 

INFORMATION PLEASE }6 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS By J. H. Schoetl 38 

prepare now to film bird life — By George Carlson 41 

HAVE YOU EVER TAKEN MOVIES OF JAPANESE-GERM AN -ITALIAN 

ships? — By Jack Irwin . 42 

when and why to use more closeups — By Cliff Chandler 43 

showmanship in screening movies — By Curtis Randall 44 

zoo offers filming opportunities for all 

— By Frederick Foster 45 

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM A TELEPHOTO LENS 

— By Stanley E. Andrews 46 
improve your movies with dolly shots — By John Riffcra/b . ._ 47 
casting problems of amateur productions — By David Bradley 48 

ITS EASY TO DEVELOP YOUR OWN MOVIE TITLES 

— By George W. Cushman 49 

EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP 50 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW 52 

THE READER SPEAKS 60 

title troubles — By George W. Cushman 61 

home movie titles — By Edmund T timer 61 

CHAS. |. Ver HALEN C. J. Ver HALEN. JR. 

PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 
6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
Everett Cellert, 62 West 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 



FEBRUARY 




NUMBER 2 
VOLUME X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. GAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORGE W. CUSHMAN 
J. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S MAGAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 



PACE 56 



HOME MOVIES POR FEBRUARY 



CRAIG ^ 

Home Movie 

EQUIPMENT 



information PLEASE 



Craig Junior Combination 




Here's a swell unit — has pair of Craig Junior 
geared Rewinds, Craig 8mm. and 16mm. Junior 
splicer, bottle of Craig Safety Film Cement and 
a water container. Sells complete, mounted on 

21-inch varnished wood base, for $8.95 

Craig Junior Splicer only $3.95 



Craig Cinetints 




d to put life and 
nto your black and 
movies. Colors are: 
inge, Purple, Blue, 
and Green— dyes 
ystal-clear and in- 
rfect transparency, 
sr black and white 
e, when used with 
Kodachrome — 
instructions 
furnished with 
each box. 
Cinetint kit, 
complete with 
6 colors, $3.25. 
Each color, 
55c a bottle. 



Craig Senior 
Splicer 




Is used for all 8mm. and 16mm. sound or silent 
film — four simple operations without wetting 
film — give you permanent splices accurate in 
every detail — guaranteed to stick — has cutter 
and a dry scraper, 
priced $10.95 complete. 
Buy Craig Home Movie 
Products from your 
photo dealer! 



wen 



Auxiliary Viewfinder (L. E. Jueng- 
ling, Parsons, Kans.) 

Q. / have a Bell & Howell 8mm. tur- 
ret camera and am having a 4" tele- 
photo lens installed. However, Bell & 
Howell advises that due to press of de- 
fense work, they are unable to make a 
matching viewfinder. 

Is there some way in which I could 
put an auxiliary lens in front of a 2" 
l ieu finder to reduce the field to corre- 
spond to that of the 4" telephoto? Or 
perhaps you know of someone who 
could make a 4" viewfinder for me? 

(This problem was submitted to Ad- 
visory Editor Dr. Baumgardner whose 
reply follows. — Ed.) 

A. Mr. Juengling's letter presents a 
most difficult problem for the amateur 
and his requirement involves more than 
the mere addition of an auxiliary lens. 
Since it is noted that the various view- 
finders for lenses of different focal 
lengths are of different length in them- 
selves, it is obvious that adding a lens 
will create a blurred picture in the 
viewfinder. It is possible to reduce the 
field, but it would be so blurred as to 
be impractical. Approximately 10 to 13 
dioptres added over the front of the 2" 
viewfinder should leave the field for 
the 4" lens. This should be done ex- 
perimentally as variations in distance 
would alter the size of field to some ex- 
tent. 

My first thought in suggesting a sub- 
stitute would be to mask off the center 
are of the 2" viewfinder so that it rep- 
resents % the area of the original. Some 
models of cameras use this method to 
provide a telephoto viewfinder. I have 
in mind particularly the Keystone mod- 
els in which a small rectangular field 
is etched in the center of the regular 
objective lens of the viewfinder. Ex- 
cept for the parallax problem, it seems 
to be quite practical. 

Perhaps a small metal mask made 
from a bottle cap of a suitable size to 
slip over the regular 2" viewfinder 
would answer the requirement. If some 
such cap can be fitted, the measurement 
should be Vz the height times '/S the 
length of the original area which, fin- 
ished, leaves an opening in the center of 
the objective lens of % the area. This 
represents a raiationship of two diame- 
ters or the difference between the 2" 
and 4" camera lenses. 

Another possibility which has had 
practical use on still cameras is the wire 
frame mounted to one side or on top of 
the camera so that the area viewed 



• Readers: This department is for your 
benefit. Send in your problems and our 
technical board will answer your questions 
in these columns. If answer by mail is de- 
sired, enclose addressed stamped envelope. 



through the frame would correspond 
to that of the lens being used. 

To determine the size of such a frame 
would be a simple matter, viz: first 
mount camera on tripod and, at any 
distance away on a flat wall make a dia- 
gram of the 3 by 4 proportion for 
screen area and then move the camera 
until the diagram just fills the 2" view- 
finder. At this distance a wire frame 
which would cover the same area, if al- 
ways used at the same distance from the 
eye, would have the corresponding field 
and another frame of '/4 the area would, 
at the same distance from the eye, pro- 
vide the area for the 4" lens. 

I believe that either of these meth- 
ods would serve satisfactorily until a 
proper viewfinder is available; and with 
some allowances for parallax according 
to the distance used, results should be 
approximately correct. — Dr. A. K. 
Baumgardner. 

Simple Fade (Jas. Mclnerny, Grand 
Rapids, Mich.) 

Q. What is the simplest method for 
making fades? 

A. Effective fadeins and fadeouts can 
be made by simply opening or closing 
lens during filming. This requires film- 
ing at a stop of approximately f 6.5 or 
f/8 in order to allow enough latitude 
for opening or closing lens down from 
f/16. 

Fades can also be made by a simple 
chemical process after film is exposed. 
Fade is made by gradually immersing 
beginn'ng or end of scene in chemical 
dye. 



REMEMBER 
There's A War On! 

IF your copy of Home Movies amies 
later than usual, remember that the na- 
tion's transportation systems aiding our 
unprecedented war effort are now taxed 
to capacity. Magazines and many other 
items must gii e way to movement of war 
materials, troops and equipment. Under 
the circumstances, we know Home 
Movies' readers will beat with us. 

— Home Movies. 



CRAIG MOVIE SUPPLY CO. 

Los Angeles San Francisco Seattle 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PACE 37 



NEW CASTLE WAR MOVIE! 



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village with machine gun and grenade! Here's a 
breathtaking picture of heroic deeds that will leave 
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PACE 38 



HOmF MOVIES TOR rrBRUARY 



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of <?imateur film* 



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S C 



I DON'T know how many ama- 
teur's whose films you analyze follow 
your advice," wrote one appreciative 
cinefilmer recently, "But I re-shot those 
scenes as you suggested and I want you 
to know how much it improved my 
picture. I'm returning the picture to 
you for another review and ask your 
candid opinion of the changes I have 
made." 

Many readers whose films we regu- 
larly analyze and criticize make an 
earnest endeavor to improve them and 
this makes us feel our efforts in this 
department are really worth while. In 
addition to the reviews printed here, 
the producer of each film has already 
received a detailed criticism sheet with 
suggestions for improving his picture 
plus the Home Movies animated merit 
leader indicating the rating given it. 

The reviews that follow are intend- 
ed solely for other readers as a guide in 
their picture making. We believe that 
by discussing the problems of other 
filmers, the reader, through the ex- 
amples illustrated, learns to improve his 
own techniques. 

"The Wages of Sin" produced by 
Graemes Moorhead is an 8mm. black 
and white comedy film, 200 feet in 
length. Story concerns Elmer, a way- 
ward husband, entrusted with banking 
the family funds as a college nest egg 
for his infant child. En route to the 
bank, Elmer encounters a friend and 
wife in need of cash. He loans the 
friend twenty dollars to make a trip. 
The friend's wife, attracted by the 
bankroll, invites Elmer to her apart- 
ment and three days later Elmer is 
stretched out on a sofa, drunk and 
broke. Of course the woman's husband 
returns to find Elmer there, kicks him 
out. Meantime, Elmer's wife and child 
have suffered neglect in his absence. El- 
mer returns home, and is received cor- 
dially by his wife. The dialogue in titles 
relating to this closing scene furnishes 
climax to the comedy. 

While this film was based upon an 
amusing comedy situation, action could 
have been stepped up considerably by 
playing more of it in closeups. Come- 
dies depend for much of their success 
upon the reaction of the characters more 
than anything else, and therefore re- 



• All amateurs, whether subscribers 
to HOME MOVIES or not, are invited 
to submit their films to the editors 
for review and helpful criticism. 

Reviewed films will be rated one, 
two three, and four stars, and films 
qualifying for two or more stars will 
receive, free, an animated leader. 

Exceptional films qualifying for 
the distinction of the "Movie of the 
Month" will be treated in detail in 
a feature-length article in a follow- 
ing issue of HOME MOVIES. In ad- 
dition, a certificate evidencing the 
award of "Movie of the Month" and 
a special animated "Movie of the 
Month" leader will be returned with 
such films after review. 



action should have been filmed in close- 
ups for benefit of the audience. 

An instance is where Elmer, on way 
to bank, meets couple in park. After 
introducing them in long shot, the 
rest of the action up to time Elmer de- 
parts with other man's wife should have 
been pictured in closeups and medium 
shots. This same technique could have 
been applied with more effect, too, in 
the sequence showing Elmer drunk in 
woman's apartment. 

While photography of this picture 
appeared generally good, it could not 
be fully evaluated in view of the dupli- 
cate print submitted. Good editing and 
titling further enhanced the produc- 
tion which received a two-star merit 
leader. 

"King of Swing" is a swell title 
that fails to be supported by the pic- 
ture that follows it. Produced by Don 
Campbell, in 8mm. sepia-toned, this 
picture portrays the trials and tribula- 
tions of a dub golfer with a non-to- 
helpful caddy. 

After much swinging at the ball and 
missing it, golfer finally arrives on 
green where the ball performs mysteri- 
ously near the cup. Trick photography 
was effectively employed to produce 
illusion of ball rolling in and out of 
cup, etc. 

Filmer Campbell made the same mis- 
take so many amateurs do who under- 
take comedy — that of failing to use re- 
straint in the comedy action. Result is 
that action and antics of golfer are 
• ( tmUmmed uti I'jgi' s > 







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C * 4- 



PAGE 40 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 




3 things to do to conserve film 



WARTIME is no time to 
have to do re-takes. Film 
must be used carefully. 

So remember these three sugges- 
tions: 1 Be doubly sure of your 
exposure before you start shooting. 
Extra care here will save your film 
and your money. 
2 | Be sure you're using the right 
film for the scene. On indoor shots 
like the one above, or for any 
changing light condition, use an 
extra-fast film. You can't buy a 
faster film than Agfa Ansco Triple 



S Pan. In addition to its great 
speed, it has balanced contrast to 
provide desirable brilliance out- 
doors, yet avoid harsh effects under 
artificial light. It has plenty of 
latitude too. 

3 If you have any technical pho- 
tographic questions that we can 
help you with . . . send 'em in. 
We've established an information 
service for you to use whenever you 
choose, and free of charge. Address 
your letter to Agfa Ansco Informa- 
tion, Binghamton, New York. 



Agfa Ansco 

8 and 16 mm. 

TRIPLE S PAN 
Reversible Film 



HOME MOVIES 

Published in Hollywood 
FEBRUARY 1943 



(I 



INE cinefilming subject not 
affected by war time restrictions is birds 
and bird life. Filming the mating cycle, 
the nesting and feeding habits, or just 
the ordinary activities of birds that 
abound in our gardens can furnish a 
year's concentrated activity for our 
camera without involving the use of 
our automobile and precious tires and 
gasoline. And now is the time to pre- 
pare. 

Much of the advice which the novice 
usually receives on the subject of film- 
ing birds usually overstresses the need 
for such extremes in equipment as 
sound-proof camera blimps, camera 
blinds, telephoto lenses, electrically op- 
erated remote controls, etc. For years 
such technical dope had me scared away 
from the idea of filming a record of 
bird life — an ambition that, happily, 
has since been fulfilled. 

About a year ago I firmly resolved 
to get down to business and make my 
bird picture. I decided to do it in a 
casual manner, taking shots as time and 
opportunity permitted and regardless of 
how long it might take to assemble the 
complete reel. My camera was a simple 





Prepare now to film 

BIRD-LIFE 



By GEORGE 

8mm. Filmo with a i 3 /j inch telephoto 
lens mounted on a sturdy tripod. The 
only other accessory was a home con- 
structed remote control which permit- 
ted me to operate the camera while 
concealed behind shrubs or trees some 
distance away. 

This control which, incidentally was 
illustrated and described in the Septem- 
ber issue of Home Movies and which 
is pictured below, consists of an re- 
shaped strip of metal to which is at- 
tached a small hinge that contacts 
starting button on my camera. A string 
leading from this contact arm extends 
beneath the camera to a stake driven 
into the ground, whence it passes 
through a screw-eye and beyond to my 



• Here is a simple remote control 
which may be adapted to most cine 
cameras. A small hinge, bolted to 
an L-shaped bracket contacts cam- 
era starting button when cord is 
drawn. Cord runs to eye screw in 
stake in ground, thence to filmer 
concealed at a distance. 



place of concealment. At the proper 
moment when a bird alights in the pre- 
determined field of view before my 
camera, I merely pull on the string 
which sets my camera in motion, and 
hold it for duration of the exposure. 

Such a remote control, although han- 
dy at times, is not absolutely essential. 
I used mine only about three times in 
shooting 200 feet of 8mm. Kodachrome 
on my bird subject. The rest of the 
footage I shot in the usual manner — 
with my finger on the camera button. 

A telephoto lens, I'll admit, is almost 
a necessity where vivid closeups are 
desired. Bird films become interesting 
only when the camera has filmed them 
in a manner to permit close study of 
their actions, plumage, color, etc., on 
the screen. Long shots, with the bird 
occupying only a minute portion of the 
screen, offer nothing more than one us- 
ually gets in observing birds at first 
hand. It is necessary, therefore, to bring 
them up close on the screen. To film 
• Continued on Page 56 



41 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



• t 



• Hundreds of amateur photograph- 
ers have made movies or photographs 
like these of ships during pre-war 
voyages to foreign lands. Such pic- 
tures of Axis ships are now invaluable 
to our government, no matter how old. 



J4ave you ever taken motion picture* 



of 




If so, your government 
urgently needs them! 




&hip& 



w 



H. 



[ERE'S opportunity for many movie amateurs to 
perform a valuable service for our country. Valuable mili- 
tary use can be made by the Government of any movies and 
photographs taken of Japanese, German and Italian ships 
— particularly warships. 

Hundreds of American camera fans who toured foreign 
lands or made extensive cruises during the past ten years, 
brought back scenes filmed aboard foreign steamships and 
freighters. Many of them made pictures of Axis warcraft 
prior to our entry into the war. Many Axis ships visited 
American ports frequently before the war, and were filmed 
or photographed by amateurs. Such pictures of our enemy's 
ships can now reveal important information to our gov- 
ernment. Such material five, or even ten years old, may now 
prove of great value. 

Amateur and professional photographers can render their 
country an important service by turning in any likely ma- 
terial promptly. A few feet of film or a single photograph 
of an Axis ship may be useful in just the way our enemies 
will feel it most. This type of pictorial information is par- 
ticularly valuable, because it cannot be duplicated from 
any other source. 

The need for such films is urgent. If you have any ma- 
terial that might be useful, prepare to make it available 
at once. You do not have to surrender it but merely loan 
it so that it may be duplicated. All usable shots will be 
duplicated and the entire material returned promptly in 
original condition. Both 8mm. and 16mm. movie footage 
is wanted. Still photographs can be utilized in negative 
or print form. 

Send all films and pictures to Castle Films, 30 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York City, who are engaged in collecting, eval- 
uating and duplicating this material for the Government. 
Where motion picture film is to be submitted, the ship 
scenes may be separated from other irrelevant material if 
desired or the entire reel may be submitted. Be sure that 
your reel and the package in which your film or pictures 
are submitted carries your name and complete address 
plainly marked. 



42 




• Demonstrating use of closeup as reaction shot to heighten humor in a comedy sequence. Proper timing of the cut 
to closeup is essential. — Photos by Harold M. Lambert. 



reason motion pictures have 
triumphed over the stage as a source 
of entertainment is because movies, 
through the medium of closeups, bring 
action closer to the spectator. Not 
enough amateurs realize the importance 
of closeups as a means of injecting max- 
imum interest in their movies. It is 
just as easy to shoot a closeup as a long 
shot, and a closeup requires less film 
because it takes the spectator less time 
to observe details in the vivid, closer 
shot. If for no other reason than to 
conserve film by the increased number 
of scenes he can thus get in a roll of 
film, the amateur should think more in 
terms of closeups when shooting movies. 

What constitutes a closeup? 

That depends upon the subject be- 
ing photographed. If the subject is peo- 
ple, then a closeup consists of filling 
the screen with their head and shoulders. 
Then there are closeups of hands and of 
feet when engaged in interesting action 
that must be emphasized on the screen. 
If the subject is a flower or any inanimate 
object, then a closeup consists of pic- 
turing the flower or object full screen 
size. Smart cinefllmers given to travel- 
ing and recording the interesting detail 
of places they visit, invariably include 
closeups of intricate designs in architec- 
ture such as may be found in Taxco, 
Mexico or in India. A Taxco cathedral, 
for instance, is an enthralling sight 
viewed from anv distance, but its real 



%Vken and why to u£e 

CLOSE-IPS 



B y 



more 



CLIFF 



beauty is revealed in closeups of archi- 
tectural detail. 

The real importance of closeups comes 
when producing a scenario or photo- 
play. Important characters in a play 
should be singled out and their char- 
acteristics emphasized in a closeup im- 
mediately after the character's intro- 
duction. Moreover, any heavy emoting 
of characters should be filmed in close- 
up because the closeup adds necessary 
emphasis to the action. 

Closeups should always emphasize 
bits of action important to the story be- 
cause such action is usually only vague- 
ly discernible in medium or long shots. 
For this reason a shot of a person writ- 
ing should be followed by a closeup of 
what he is writing; a scene show- 
ing a man reaching carefully into a 
desk drawer should be followed by a 
closeup of what he found there; and 
a person shown operating a machine in 



CHANDLER 

a medium shot can be made more inter- 
esting if a closeup of what he is doing 
with the machine follows. 

Closeups serve as "reaction shots," 
too. In the pictures at top of page, a 
pretty bathing girl passes a fisherman 
who stops and looks at her approving- 
ly. The closeup at the right adds a hu- 
man interest touch and builds for the 
comedy effect intended. 

Using a closeup to climax action is 
illustrated in the two scenes at bottom 
of page, taken from a wedding picture. 
Here the closeup of bride and groom 
embracing is a fitting sequel to the 
wedding scenes that preceded it. 

When making a documentary pic- 
ture, the closeup should frequently be 
used to reveal all important details at 
close range. One recent amateur docu- 
mentary on the subject of pottery mak- 
ing was outstanding for its abundance 

• Continual on Page 59 



43 



• How a closeup was 
used effectively to 
climax a wedding se- 
quence in an amateur 
film produced by Pat 
Rafferty of Long 
Beach, Calif. Well 
staged and lighted it 
matches many profes- 
sional's work. 





m 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 




• Sound, if only in the form of back- 
ground music, is almost an essential 
to present-day screening of home 
movie films. Elaborate equipment is 
unnecessary. A single turntable or 
record player and a selection of or- 
chestral recordings of a mood to fit 
the picture is ali that is necessary 



C. E. Bell 



SHOWMANSHIP 



in 



Screening, movie* 



• • • 



B y 



CURT 



(IKE tying a necktie or using 
banquet silverware, there's a right and 
wrong way to screen home movies, too. 
We refer not to screening the latest 
reel of shots for the family so much 
as to the shows we give when neigh- 
bors are invited in, or where our films 
are exhibited outside the home. It is in 
these latter instances that showmanship 
coupled with thoughtful planning will 
net from our audience the maximum 
appreciation for our films. 

The earliest theatrical movies were 
screened in makeshift theatres that pre- 
viously were vacant store buildings. La- 
ter, they were fitted with more com- 
fortable seats, houselights were con- 
trolled by dimming switches, and a 
piano furnished theme music as the pic- 
tures were screened. Even in those days 



RANDALL 



it was found audiences became more re- 
ceptive when comfortably seated and 
there was off-stage music that harmon- 
ized with the action on the screen. 

The theatrical motion picture today 
boasts refinements undreamed of in 
nickleodeon days and theatre audiences 
accustomed to sound, com- 
fortable lighting, and other 
refinements of the modern 
theatre are not as appre- 
ciative of silent home mov- 
ies as they might be if home 



• A microphone leading 
to the radio placed near 
the screen will enable you 
to speak a running com- 
mentary with your film 
with professional results. 



projection of films was accomplished 
with more showmanship and skill. 

Today with the screening of films 
destined to become a more active phase 
of our hobby, a little serious thought 
to presentation is not out of place. Few 
movie amateurs will deny that show 
manship in projection has been a sadly 
negleced study. 

Some of the things that mark a poor 
home movie showman is the practice of 
stopping the show to make a regular 
splice in a parted film ; turning on the 
room lights while the picture is on the 
screen; rewinding each reel of a mul- 
ti-reel feature before proceeding to the 
next reel; and giving oral explanation 
as the film is projected instead of hav- 
ing titles that explain the picture. 

The skillful projectionist will be pre- 
pared with bits of scotch or adhesive 
tape near his projector in case of a 
break in the film, quickly joining the 
broken ends together with the tape and 
continuing projection. Better still, he 
will make sure his splices are good in 
the first place and insure they will not 
break during projection by making pe- 
riodical checks of his film. The pro- 
jectionist should make it a point to have 
more than one spare projection reel so 
that he can show a multi-reel subject 
without stopping to rewind the previous 
reel. There is always ample time after 
a show to re-wind films. 

One annoyance too few projection- 
ists ever do anything about is the spill 
light from the lamp house which, with 
some projectors, is extremely annoying 
to those who must be seated near them. 
Not only do some projectors cast unnec- 
essary light on the ceiling but they emit 
• Continued on Page $5 




HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



• "Shoot the goo to me Lou," says 
this denizen of the zoo as he sizes up 
a visitor about to toss a morsel of 
food. Antics of bears offer unlimited 
comedy material for movie cameras. 
Next to monkeys, bears are zoo's most 
interesting actors. 



IN contemplating the filming 
locales left open to the cine amateur, 
the zoo presents much in hitherto un- 
fathomed filming possibilities. True, 
many amateurs have taken their cameras 
to the zoo for a few hit-and-miss shots, 
but they overlooked the opportunities 
for interesting, full-reel pictures of the 
zoo and its inhabitants. Now that we 
must look about our immediate envir- 
ons for movie making subjects, the local 
zoo rates first choice on the list of pos- 
sibilities. 

One need only recall the mediocre 
movies they liave seen filmed by neigh- 
boring movie amateurs in which fences, 
cages, and shadows intruded to make 
the pictures scarcely discernible, to un- 
derstand the possibilities for improve- 
ment. For it is possible to make pic- 
tures at almost any zoo sans these dis- 
turbing elements if a little study of the 
zoo and its inhabitants is made in ad- 
vance. In this way it is possible to de- 
termine and make note of the time of 
day best to shoot certain subjects; time 
of day or day of the week when a min- 
imum of visitors are present; and 
whether or not the zoo attendant will 
cooperate in "letting down the restric- 
tive bars" where necessary to permit 
getting closer shots or to shoot un- 
hindered by fences, etc. 

If this is to be a more than ordinary 
zoo picture — a careful and thoughtful- 
ly produced document instead of a se- 
ries of random shots of caged animals — 
then it becomes necessary to fully plan 
the picture in advance. There are many 
themes: a record of a visit to a particu- 
lar collection a definite story center- 
ing around certain animals ; a study of 
one particular species; and, of course, 
the visitor through the eyes of the zoo 
occupants, to mention a few. 

The first mentioned is possibly the 
most popular, but is full of pitfalls and 
usually results in a mixed picture of 
humans and a few glimpses of animals 
behind bars. If this theme is to be pre- 
sented in an interesting form, the shots 
should first establish the location, then 




Ll °y<t G. Mill er 



ZOO o((er£ filming 
opportunities (or all . . . 



B y 



FRED E R 



C K 



FOSTER 



proceed to review the animals, etc., in 
some order of interest or contrast. 

Many public zoos provide guide 
books. Where these are available they 
should be thoroughly studied first since 
they usually contain data concerning 
the species of animals and sometimes 
photographs of them which will serve 
as a guide as to the best angle to photo- 
graph them. In other words, by follow- 
ing the professional photographer's 
technique, you can't go wrong. 

With regard to camera and acces- 
sories, the normal focal-length lens is 
adequate. It should be well protected 
with a lens hood, for invariably there'll 
be shooting to do toward the sun in 
some parts of the zoo. A medium tele- 
photo lens, of course, will be a necessity 
where intimate studies are wanted of 



those animals, birds, etc., which invari- 
ably remain toward rear of the cage or 
where certain animals such as bears, 
lions, etc., are maintained in open en- 
closures some distance from the specta- 
tors as is the case in many of the more 
modern zoos. 

An exposure meter is an absolute ne- 
cessity. In no other type of filming will 
so much adverse lighting be encoun- 
tered. So it becomes necessary to calcu- 
late exposure very carefully in order 
that animals and birds in shade or 
against pens and rockeries of deep col- 
orings, be fully exposed and made to 
stand out against the background on 
the screen. On this point, more than 
any other, does the average zoo filmer 
fall down. And this is usually because 
• Continued on Page 59 



45 





HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



CAMERA. (Of* FROM CJ1ILDRCN , I LENS. 



CAMERA 30ff PROM CHILDREN -3 TEJ.EPMOT0 
LEN3. - NOTC CHILDREN A/U THE 5ANE 
3IZC A3 IN OTHER RiCTJRE, BUT BACK 
&ROVHO 15 LARGER. 



4 Sop > 



-30O ft . 



-X—Zof- 



WITH A STANDARD LENS 
A SHOT or AN AEROPLANE 
LANDING WOULO ONLY BE 
A CLOSE "UP SHOT WHEN IN 
TWC AftCA NEAREST THE CANERA 



" J 



Flo. 5 



BT STANDING FARTHER 
AWAY AND A 
TELEPttOTO LE« THE 
AtROPLAKE WOULD BE 
LARCt THROUGHOUT TH 
ENTIRE »rtOT. 



/ 

♦yTCLfPHOTO LEN5 



• Diagrams show comparative effects 
to be obtained with regular and tele- 
photo lenses. The advantages of tele- 
photo lenses are described further in 
the article beginning on this page. 



What to expect from a 

TELEPHOTO LENS... 



n 



[OW often the movie amateur 
who has only one lens on his camera, 
looks into the middle distance and sees 
a deer, a sailboat, a girl in a bathing 
suit, or some other object, and remarks: 
"Oh, boy! If I only had a telephoto 
lens!" and then debates whether or 
not to save up and buy one, finally dis- 
missing the idea with, "Oh well, it's 
only for an occasional shot like this 
that I would want it, and I don't think 
it would warrant the cost." This would 
be quite a reasonable remark if these 
were the only kind of shots for which a 
telephoto lens could be used. There are, 
however, other uses for telephotos, some 



W 



of which will be described here: 

( i ) Objects too small to be photo- 
graphed properly with a standard lens 
can be sharply photographed with a tel- 
ephoto lens. With a 3-inch, 16mm. tele- 
photo lens, (or iJ/^-inch, 8mm.), we 
can clearly photograph such small sub- 
jects as the trade name on a cigarette, 
or the texture of cloth. With a telepho- 
to focused at 1 foot, we can photograph 
a postage stamp so that it will nearly fill 
the screen. 

It must be kept in mind that at such 
close distances focussing is quite criti- 
cal, and unless we are photographing a 
flat surface, it may be necessary to in- 



crease lighting to enable using a small 
enough lens stop to increase depth of 
focus and thus bring the entire object 
in focus from back to front, and not 
merely the face of it. 

(2) Telephotos are frequently used 
to make closeup shots or to follow dis- 
tant action with medium shot effect 
without having to move the camera 
closer to the action. For example, a 
stream or rough terrain may separate 
camera from the action; or we may be 
photographing some wildlife that would 
be impossible to film if we were to move 
in closer with our camera and tripod. 

(3) Perspective between background 
objects and those in the foreground can 
be materially altered through use of a 
telephoto lens. Thus, we can film an ob- 
ject situated against a somewhat clut- 
tered background and take in only a 
limited portion of background detail — 
something that would not be possible 
with the regular camera lens without 
resorting to shallow depth of focus. 

(4) A telephoto may be employed to 
gain just the opposite effect in back- 
ground as just described. Instead of 
eliminating some of the background 
detail from the scene, it may be desir- 
able to bring into prominence some ob- 
ject in the background. An example 
would be a scene of two children play- 
ing in the surf in which an old piling 
was located some distance in the water. 

To film such a scene in a medium 
shot with a regular lens would result 
in picturing the children against an ex- 
panse of water. But by using a tele- 
photo lens and moving the camera back 
from the children until the children 
filled the picture frame in the same pro- 
portion as in the standard lens shot, the 
piling in the water would be brought 
into prominence as a balancing me- 
dium in the composition. This is illus- 
trated in Figs. 1, 2, and 3 of the ac- 
companying illustration. 

( 5 ) Another important use for the 
telephoto lens is to obtain close shots of 
large objects moving in the distance 
but in a manner that their size remains 
fairly constant on the screen during 
the entire shot. We know that in shoot- 
ing a plane in flight through panorama 
action, the plane at first appears small 
as we pick it up approaching at the 

• Continued on Page $7 



46 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



r. v V-V; 



lOST students of cinematography 
are familiar with that innovation in 
camera technique known as the "dolly 
shot" in which the camera, mounted 
upon a movable truck or carriage called 
a dolly, moves about the set to follow 
action or to change the camera angle 
while the action continues. 

The achievement of dolly shots is so 
simple as to demand greater attention 
from those amateurs indulging serious 
filming. In fact many amateur movie 
makers already are using dolly shots, 
having constructed their own camera 
dollies from easily acquired materials or 
have utilized baby carriages or a child's 
coaster wagon on which to mount the 
camera for the traveling camera effect. 

For interior filming, a dolly like the 
one pictured below is easily made and 
will give perfect results on smooth 
floors. The framework was made of 2- 
in. by 2 -in. strips of pine bolted to- 
gether. Two solid rubber caster wheels 
are attached, free-running, on either 
side of the front cross-bar, and a caster, 
complete with swivel housing, was in- 
stalled at the back. The "free-wheeling" 
of the rear caster provides all the free 
movement of the dolly necessary. 

For all general filming purposes, in- 
doors as well as out, it is best to equip 
the dolly with larger wheels such as 
those of a coaster wagon, tricycle or 
rubber-tired scooter. The most ideal 
wheels are those fitted with balloon 
tires such as are found on most wheel 
toys today. 

Certain locations preclude the use 
of a camera dolly unless a track is pro- 
vided for the dolly to run upon. This 
track may be constructed from two-by- 
fours of the required length and laid 
flat. A trough for the wheels to follow 
may be formed by tacking strips of 
1 -in. by i-in. material on the two-by- 
fours. In use, every precaution should 
be taken to insure that the track lies 
solidly on the ground, otherwise the 
dolly will dip or sway as it passes over 
any depression that might occur in the 
surface over which the tracks are laid. 
Building up the low spots with wedges 
of wood is the usual practice. 

Follow action by the camera, set up- 
on a dolly, may be accomplished in va- 
rious ways — that is, the camera can fol- 
low the characters or action from the 
side or the rear, or camera may precede 
the characters who follow some distance 
behind the retreating camera. The meth- 
od selected depends, of course, upon the 





is 




o Picture the camera traveling in unison with the youth and girl and you'll 
visualize the unique effect of this dolly shot in which the boughs of trees and 
shrubs are projected between subjects and camera. 



Smprove uour movies 

u*k DOLLY SHOTS 



story being filmed, the action at hand, 
and the location and terrain where the 
action takes place. 

Let us take for example a familiar 
bit of action — that of a child riding a 
tricycle. If this action takes place on 
a sidewalk in front of a home, the cam- 
era and dolly could follow from any 
of the angles previously mentioned and, 
if the sidewalk is smooth, without need 
of a track. On the other hand, suppose 
we want to picture more effectively 
some hikers in a country lane, or the 
movement of one or more characters 
along a path through a thicket. This 
would require laying track parallel to 
the path in order that the camera could 
move smoothly during the entire length 
of the follow shot. 

Dolly shots reach their height in ef- 
fectiveness when made out of doors in 
action such as this, and when objects 
such as trees or shrubbery come between 
camera and actors during progress of 
the shot as illustrated in photo at top 
of this page. This type of shot is fre- 
quently used in professional pictures 
and is familiar to all of us. Yet it is a 



• Here is a simple camera truck or 
dolly any amateur can build from 
lumber and roller skate wheels or 
furniture casters. Tracks for using 
same on exterior shots may be 
built of two-by-fours. 



cinematic effect that few amateurs, as 
yet, have utilized. 

The forward and backward dolly 
shots are particularly adaptable to faster 
action when a "zooming" of the cam- 
era toward or away from the character 
or object effectively heightens interest. 
But this effect can be utilized for ordi- 
nary homey subjects, too. Take for in- 
stance, a filming record of a child's 
• Continued on Page 5^ 




47 




HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



• Author David Bradley, at ex- 
treme right, filming a closeup 
for "Peer Gynt." Here, script 
girl, makeup artist and an as- 
sistant stand by to render any 
assistance necessary in this lo- 
cation shot. 



Casting, Problem* o( 
cAmateur Production* 



0 



INE question invariably asked 
by experienced movie amateurs who 
have seen the 16mm. productions of 
"Oliver Twist" and "Peer Gynt" is: 
How did you ever manage so large an 
amateur cast? Particularly do they want 
to know how I was able to keep such 
an extensive cast of principals together 
for the duration of such lengthy pro- 
ductions. 

When I produced "Oliver Twist" I 
must admit I encountered almost insur- 
mountable cast problems. But I profited 
by these experiences and by the time 
I was ready to shoot my second multiple 
reel production, "Peer Gynt," my cast 
troubles were practically nil. 

Any amateur movie producer who 
has attempted a serious photoplay knows 
that getting a cast to keep appoint- 
ments is a headache. Amateur players 
don't get paid and as most of them 
often undertake a part just for the fun 
of it, their consciences don't bother 
them when, if a "date" opportunity oc- 
curs, they let the producer and his as- 



sociates down at the last minute. Once 
an actor assumes a part and scenes are 
shot, its pretty hard to drop him and 
begin shooting all over again. So — your 
thoughtless and inconsiderate actor must 
be "nursed along" so the picture can 
be finished without loss. 

Such troubles usually occur when a 
person has been chosen for his appear- 
ances rather than acting ability. Ama- 
teur producers do not have a wide 
choice of talent to choose from as do 
the Hollywood studios. In fact real 
honest-to-goodness amateur talent is a 
rarity. We usually have to rely upon 
enthusiastic high school students to play 
parts in our pictures although in some, 
we were fortunate in securing players 



• Below, left: Mob scenes in "Peer 
Gynt" were peopled with citizen- 
actors attracted by a free picnic. 
Eating the food was part of action 
to be filmed Right: David Bradley 
shows his leading lady just how to 
enact a bit of business in "Peer 
Gynt." 



from a little theatre for the leads. 

I found that an amateur producing 
group, to be successful, must organize 
into units — camera, makeup, costume, 
properties, and locations. With a respon- 
sible person placed at the head of each 
unit, the task is made much easier for 
the producer. Instead of having to cope 
with scores of people plus all production 
details, the producer need only consult 
with his department heads. Now this 
may sound like big talk for amateur 
movie production, but it must be un- 
derstood that producing a ten-reel pic- 
ture like "Oliver Twist" is a collossal 
job no single amateur could undertake 
alone. Multiply by ten the problems 
encountered shooting an ordinary single 
reel home movie and add the grief of 
handling dozens of ambitious amateur 
actors and you'll understand why seri- 
ous large scale production of amateur 
movies is a gigantic and often heart- 
breaking undertaking. 

It is because many amateurs did not 
know this that a picture on which they 
had based great hopes, failed to mate- 
rialize into the success expected of it. 
It is one thing to plan a picture on pa- 
per, and another to execute its pro- 
duction. 

Deep in the heart of every movie 
amateur is the unquenchable yen to 
turn out an extensive and really serious 
scenario picture. With the story on pa- 
per comes the task of selecting the right 
people to play the roles. If the family 
circle does not hold suitable talent, the 
search must be extended. The first qual- 
ification is that the person chosen for 
a role must look the part. Home movies 
being essentially visual entertainment, 
appearances are important as acting. 
That is why so many movie characters 
are typed: the medical doctor is chosen 
• Continued on Page 5S 




HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



on the subject of title making have dealt 
with those processes which come before 
the exposure is made. This month, we 
shall discuss the principle step that 
comes after the title is filmed — develop- 
ing the film. 

There are two methods by which 
the title film may be "developed" or 
transformed to the positive, screenable 
stage, depending upon whether the title 
is photographed on reversal or positive 
film. Reversal film must be "processed" 
which differs in procedure from the 
straight development accorded positive 
film. Limited space prevents our de- 
scribing fully the reversal process and 
wc trust a brief outline will suffice. 

When titles are photographed on re- 
versal film such as panchromatic, Ko- 
dachrome, etc., the film is first devel- 
oped to a negative. The image is then 
bleached and the film re-exposed to 
light, and the remaining image then put 
through a second developer which con- 
verts it to a positive. 

Where titles are photographed on pos- 
itive film in what is known as the "di- 
rect-positive method," the film is merely 
developed to a negative and is ready for 
projection. Since the developed positive 
film becomes in fact a negative, the to- 
nal values are reversed. That is, if the 
title card was black and the text let- 
tered in white ink, as when panchro- 
mantic film is used, the positive title 
film would show a white background 
with black letters. For this reason, most 
title cards to be photographed on posi- 
tive film are lettered in black on white 
cards. 

Positive film titles are popular be- 
cause the amateur can develop them 
himself with a minimum of equipment. 
Unlike with the home reversal process, 
all that is required to develop positive 
film is a simple rack or drum on which 
to wind the film and trays or receptacles 
to hold the developer and hypo or fixing 
solution. It is even possible to develop 
titles in short lengths by hand, thus 
dispensing with the rack. 

Simple equipment which will serve 
the amateur planning extensive title 
making, can be made easily from mate- 
rials about the home. One such outfit 
is illustrated in the accompanying 
sketch. The developing trays are made 
fiom a large oil can split in the middle. 
A simple stand constructed of wood 
holds the trays securely. The develop- 
ing drum may be constructed of lum- 
ber from a discarded apple box along 
the lines illustrated. 

The drum pictured accommodates 
about 15 feet of 16mm. film and the 
tray requires the very economical 



amount of but 5 ounces of de- 
veloping solution. The trays for 
developer and hypo should be 
painted with acid resisting paint, 
otherwise chemical re-action will 
set in and spoil the film during 
development. 

In addition to this equipment 
and the developing solutions, 
only a safelight is needed to com- 
plete the outfit and make it pos- 
sible to proceed with developing 
titles. Using positive film, a red 
safelight should be employed to 
furnish illumination in the dark- 
room during the primary stages 
of the film's development. Also, 
it will be required for illumina- 
tion while loading the positive 
film in the camera. The film, in- 
cidentally, must be threaded 
with the emulsion side facing 
the lens. This precaution is men- 
tioned because positive film, es- 
pecially when purchased in bulk 
rolls, is unspooled and the emul- 
sion side is in — that is facing the 
core of the roll. 

After the titles are photo- 
graphed, the positive film is re- 
moved from the camera and 
wound, emulsion side out, upon 
the developing drum. Care must 
be taken on this point, because 
emulsion when wet is extremely 







Slip 


KM 


Ma 


•nR , 




1 


!£ 


f 




DRUM AND TRAYS 

fir 

POSITIVE FILM 
DEVELOPING- 




Sth ea*u to develop 



your own movie 



TITLES 



By GEORGE W CUSHMAN 



soft and it takes very little to scratch 
it. The film is first placed in the devel- 
oper for the required length of time. 

Probably the greatest factor determ- 
ining successful title making at home 
is the correct selection and use of the 
developer. There are dozens of film. de- 
veloping formulas, not all of them suit- 
able for positive title film. The average 
negative developer produces a soft or 
low contrast negative. However, with 
titles, a high contrast developer is re- 
quired. Most high contrast developers 
will be found satisfactory for title 
work. Eastman's D-11 is used by many 
amateurs for positive titles, developing 
the film for 5 minutes at a temperature 



of 65 0 Fah. Probably more amateurs 
now use Eastman's D-72 for positive 
titles than any other formula. With 
this developer used full strength at 65 
degrees, excellent results will be ob- 
tained with the developing time of 2 1 / 2 
to 3 minutes. Practically every film 
manufacturer supplies formulas for use 
with each film he makes, and for best 
results the developer recommended 
should be used, according to directions. 

Development may be carried out un- 
der the red or OA safelight. After rins- 
ing, in clear running water, the film is 
placed in the hypo fixing solution. The 
purpose of this second formula is to 
• Continued on Page 58 



49 



PACE 50 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



THE EXPERIM ENTAL 




Fading Gadget 

Pictured here is a fading device 
which I made for my 16mm. Keystone 
camera that works equally well on any 
cine camera. It works on the principle 
of opening or closing the lens diaphragm 
to produce a fade-in or fade-out. Add- 
ed feature is a stop attached to cam- 
era case that insures opening diaphragm 
to the right aperture when making 
fade-ins. 

Material required is a short piece of 
metal tubing 1-5/16" in diameter and 
Ys" wide, which forms the collar that 
slips over the lens ring, and a short set 
screw and three nails. Drill four holes 
around periphery of the piece of tubing 
as shown in sketch. Tap one to take the 
set screew. Tap hole directly opposite to 
receive the hand lever which may be 
made of a large nail of the right gauge, 



threaded to fit the hole. Form the tips 
on either side of lever from nail points 
filed round. These may be driven into 
place in the ring of tubing and made 
fast by spreading with a ball pein ham- 
mer. These equalize the contact of the 
ring with the lens barrel as shown in 
sketch. With the 16mm. Keystone lens, 
they fit into groove in the lens dia- 
phragm control ring. 

The "stop" A may be made from a 
piece of flat metal, drilled to take the 
screw on the Keystone camera plate, 
then bent to shap as shown. Where fad- 
ing device is to be used on other makes 
of cameras, a suitable stop can be fash- 
ioned to perform the same duty. Where 
stop is employed, action of the fader 
can be controlled as follows: If scene 
calls for an exposure of f/5.6, for ex- 
ample, set lens at f/5.6 then set handle 
of fader against the stop and tighten 
the set screw. To fade in the scene, start 
camera with lens closed and gradually 
open it by moving fader lever until it 
strikes stop on camera. — Edwin J. Yes- 
key, Ludington, Mich. 




Whirling Titles 

A whirling or revolving title is one 
cinematic effect that often stumps the 
amateur. Actually it is very easy to 
achieve, especially where titles are small. 
Here is a simple gadget any amateur 
can build for making effective revolv- 
ing titles in his typewriter titler. The 
whole thing can be made of cardboard. 

Cut a rectangular piece of cardboard 
tc fit card holder of your titler. Next 
cut a strip of heavy cardboard 1 Y2' 
wide and fold it to form the triangular 
frame as shown in sketch. Before glue- 
ing it to the cardboard rectangle, it is 
necessary to assemble the axle and hub 
on which the revolving title will be 
mounted. The hub may be cut from a 
piece of Y2" dowel or a section of a 



lead pencil may be used, the lead be- 
ing removed to make way for the nail 
that will act as axle. Punch a hole in 
center of the large card that will pro- 
vide a free-running fit for the nail ; 
then a similar hole in the center of the 
1 Yz" cardboard strip. Slip hub over 
nail (it should fit snug) and frame as- 
sembly is ready for glueing to card- 
board. 

Next cut a disc about / 2 " larger 
over all than extreme boundaries of ti- 
tle area of your titler. Applying a dab 
of glue to nailhead, affiix disc to nail- 
head at exact center and allow to dry. 
Title cards are then mounted on this 
disc by means of pieces of scotch tape 
so they may easily be removed. 

Rotation of title is achieved by means 
of a stout cord attached to the hub and 
wound tightly, and then drawn slowly 
as camera photographs the title card. 

In order to make a revolving title 
that will appear on the screen coming 
to a dead stop after rotation with the 
text centered and exactly parallel, place 
title card on disc upside down. Photo- 
graph title in this position for the re- 
quired reading time, then start the ro- 
tating action. 

When title is developed or processed, 
reverse it end for end before splicing. 
— A. E. Moore, Dayton, Ohio. 

Needle Guide 

For those who make their own disc 
recordings or use turntables to furnish 
music and sound for their films, here 
is an idea that makes the task of placing 
needle on right spot on record very 
simple. 

It consists of an L-shaped piece of 
cardboard as shown in sketch. A pencil 
mark placed at a point on the lower 
edge to correspond with position of 
needle when tone arm or cutting head is 
set against the guide, shows where 
needle will strike the record. 

Thus where it is necessary to put 
needle at an exact spot on the record, it 
is done with assistance of the guide 



GU IDE 



Pickup or cutting herd 




CUE MRRK 



PASS 'EM ALONG! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. Extraordinary ideas 
will bring you a roll of film. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they duplicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 
use. 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



Nil WORKSHOP . ett 



which is held against the pickup or cut- 
ting head as shown, then moved over 
the record. When the penciled cue 
mark corresponds to mark on record, 
needle is lowered into place and the 
guide withdrawn. To facilitate this, the 
short side or base of the L must be nar- 
row enough to clear the pickup after 
needle cantacts the record. — Dr. P. Z. 
Edgren, St. Louis, Minn. 




For Trick Shots 

Suggested here is a revolving tripod 
head with which one can make novel 
comedy shots that suggest the rocking 
of a boat, movement of an automobile, 
or the dizzy effect of being struck a 
knockout blow in a boxing match. 

As shown in sketch, the assembly 
consists of an L-shaped support A; an- 
other L-shaped support B for the cam- 
era; and the rotating disc C. The L- 
shaped members should be made from 
strap iron Y 4 " thick and it is import- 
ant that they be bent at exactly right 
angles to insure centering of camera 
on object at all times during rotation. 
Otherwise camera will appear to wob 
ble during the filming. 

The disc C may be of metal or ply- 
wood and should be secured to the 
bracket B by means of a machine screw 
shown at E. This disc is the means by 
which the camera is rotated during 
filming. To provide for use of viewfind- 
er, mount camera as far back as pos- 
sible and cut a hole in the disc C to 
correspond with location of viewfinder. 

Dimensions depend entirely upon 
make of camera used. Most important 
point to consider is that distance indi- 
cated at G. This insures camera revolv- 
ing on the lens axis. 

Holes drilled and tapped for a l / 4 " 
No. 20 screw at H and I provide fot 
attaching camera and tripod respec- 
tively. — Bob Forrest, St. Louis. Mo. 



Title Letters 

Having had some difficulty in letter- 
ing title cards in color for Kodachrome, 
I eventually found relief in a most effi- 
cient substitute for hand lettering in 
the form of colored adhesive letters 
which come in sheets and are die-cut 
ready for use. These are available in 
most dime stores in red, blue, green, 
gold and silver. 

Letters may be moistened and laid in 
place on a suitable card to form the 
title. Block letter effect may be ob- 
tained by first mounting letters on thick 
cardboard, and then cutting them out 
with a razor blade. — H. W. Castle, 
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 

Stovepipe Spotlight 

Accompanying sketch shows easy 
method of building an efficient spotlight 
from materials easily found about the 
home. Housing is a short length of 6" 
stove pipe. Into one end a 6" disc of 
wood is nailed in place. This disc has 
been perforated with half-inch holes. 
Another hole drilled in center provides 
for a short length of water pipe which 
acts as a sleeve for the adjustable rod 
that holds the photoflood lamp socket. 
This rod may be a piece of pipe of small- 
er diameter. Socket is attached at one 



JfT SCREW 




end and the wires run through to the 
other end. Machine screws set into the 
sleeve provide for adjusting lamp. 

A 6" condenser lens, obtainable from 
most theatre supply houses, is fitted in- 
to other end of stove pipe and held in 
place by means of metal screws. 

A home-made wooden standard may 
be constructed for this spotlight to 
which it may be attached by means of 
the U-shaped bracket made of strap 
iron as shown. — Gerald Foster, Tulsa, 
Okla. 



PACE 51 



g,adget£ } trick* & 
shortcut 4 contri- 



buted by, Cinebug,* 



Pre-focusing Idea 

One of the drawbacks to more fre- 
quent home projection of home movies 
is the amount of time and trouble re- 
quired in setting up projector, assem- 
bling screen, and finally checking sharp 
focus before starting the show. 

To remedy focusing problem, I 
spliced three or four frames from an 
old title into middle of each film leader. 
This enables me to check on focus in 
advance of runnnig the films. The 
film is threaded so that one of the frames 
rests in the film gate. With projector set 
for "still" projection, I flash on the 
lamp long enough to adjust focus, then 
proceed with my show. — D. /. Wilson, 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Photoflood Standards 

The large metal funnels available at 
dime stores not only make excellent 
photoflood reflectors, but they also 
provide splendid bases for broom-stick 
lamp standards. As sketched below. 

Most metal funnels are made in two 
sections so that if funnel is placed on 
floor spout up, a sharp blow with a 
hammer will separate spout from the 
funnel. Otherwise tinner's shears may 
be used to cut away the spout. Next fit 
a broom stick or length of wood dowl- 
ing of proper size in opening as shown, 
extending it to depth of the funnel. 
Pour a mixture of cement in funnel and 
set upright, allowing to dry for about 
24 hours. When cemeent solidifies, the 
lamp standard is complete and ready for 
uses. Clamp-on reflectors attached to 
the broom-stick upright complete the 
unit. — H. C. Godbe, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 




PACE 52 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 




ome movie 



Where to rent or buy 8mm. and 16mm. films 



1 0 augment your home movie shows, make use of the fine libraries 
of rental films, both sound and silent, maintained by your photo dealer for 
owners of 8mm. and 16mm. projectors. Rental rates are surprisingly low and 
new films are added at regular intervals. Dealers listed below will gladly assist 
with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 



CALIFORNIA 



HOLLYWOOD 

Bailey Film Service 
US I Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
716 N. La Brea Ave. 

Castle't Inc. 
152? Vine Street 



LOS ANGELES 

Films Incorporated 
1789 W. 8th Street 

Robert Crawford Pictures 
1702 Kingsley Dr. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
Photo & Sound, Inc. 
153 Kearny St. 



CONNECTICUT! 

WATERBURY 

Multiprises 

100 E. Main St., 

P. O. Box 1 125 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1221 G St., N. W. 

ILLINOIS 

BERWYN 

Colonial Camera Shop 
6904 Windsor Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1825 Larchmont Ave. 

Films Incorporated 
64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 



INDIANA 



INDIANAPOLIS 

W. Stuart Bussey 

17 East St. Joseph St. 



IOWA 



MASON CITY 



Decker Bros. 

209 No. Federal Ave. 



KANSAS 



WICHITA 



Jeff's Camera Shop 
139 N. Broadway 



Lewis Film Exchange 
216 East 1st St. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



Don Elder's F'llm Library 
739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 

Frank Lane and Company 
5 Little Building 



MICHIGAN 



DETROIT 



Detroit Camera Shop 
325 State Street 



NEW YORK 



KENMORE 

Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
2811 Delaware Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Films Incorporated 
330 W. 42nd St. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 45th St. 

Haber & Fink, Inc. 
12-14 Warren St. 

Medo Photo Supply 
15 West 47th St. 

National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 

Nu-Art Films, Inc. 
145 West 45th Street 



OHIO 



CINCINNATI 



Ralph V. Haile & Assoc. 
215 Walnut St. 



DAYTON 



Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 



ORECON 



PORTLAND 



Films Incorporated 
314 S. W. 9th Avenue 

TEXAS 

DALLAS 

National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 
2024 Main St. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON 

Elmer B. Simpson 
816 W. Virginia St. 



J/ you 
FILM to sk 



want a 



ow 



NEWS OF TIMELY SUBJECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Latest War Movies 

Some of the most remarkable motion 
pictures to come out of this war 
up to now are two thrilling episodes of 
the current global conflict in Castle 
Films' latest release for home projectors, 
"U. S. Carrier Fights for Life," and 
"Russia Strikes Back," both of which 
are combined in the one film release. 

The Carrier battle episode pictures 
the life and death struggle against a 
furious attack by Jap Bombers. Wave 
after wave of attacking planes roar to- 
ward the dauntless carrier to be met 
with a hail of bullets from the U. S. 
ship's gun crews. The daring camera- 
man caught shots of several near-misses 
as Jap planes crash right and left into 
the sea. The stern of the carrier is set 
afire by a direct hit. Within seconds the 
ship's firefighters have flames under con- 
trol. Rapid repairs are made and the 
valiant ship fights on. More Jap planes 
are downed as the assault is renewed. A 
bomb lands squarely upon the flight 
deck only a few feet away from the 
camera! Concussion from a near-miss 
almost blasts an American plane from 
the deck as the last of the attackers are 
driven off. 




"Russia Strikes Back" occupying the 
remaining half of the film, is an authen- 
tic record of Russian courage and fight- 
ing skill that has turned the tide of 
war against the bewildered Nazis. Here 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PACE 53 



are amazing scenes of Russia's heroic 
transformation to the offensive. The 
blazing inferno of Stalingrad provides 
the springboard for the assault. Build- 
ing by building, street by street, the 
Russians drive the Nazis back. The at- 
tack spreads along the entire 1200 mile 
front. Tanks, carrying loads of assault 
troops, roll into battle. Anti-aircraft 
guns down Stuka bombers. The Nazis 
are driven reeling through the snow. 
This vivid double-feature picture is 
available in 8mm. and 16mm. at pho- 
tographic dealers at the usual Castle 
prices. 




Soundies 

Good motion picture news for 1943 
is the announcement by Walter O. Gut- 
lohn, Inc., that they are distributing an 
outstanding group of three minute 
1 6mm. Sound Musical Films. These 
shorts are sold under the title of 
''Soundies" and consist of 18 different 
subjects, each 100 foot length featuring 
the country's foremost dance orchestras 
and entertainers. 

Among the dance numbers are: Gene 
Krupa in "Let Me Off Uptown," one of 
his favorites, which has been a show 
stopper in all his theatrical engage- 
ments; Cab Calloway in his famous 
"Minnie the Moocher:" Johnny Mess- 
ner in "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree" 
presented in a lilting, swingy style with 
a military setting; Will Bradley in 
"Barnyard Bounce," a hot tune featur- 
ing the world-famous drummer, Ray 
McKinley. Many other leading bands 
are also featured in this series. 

Soundies also present a group of pa- 
triotic and army songs, such as: "I Am 
An American" sung in a rousing, spine- 
tingling manner by Carolyn Marsh with 
a military chorus; "K. P. Serenade" 
with the well-known Hoosier Hot Shots 
on K. P. duty; "Good Morning Mr. Zip, 
Zip, Zip" with Tany Pastor. Strictly for 
laughs, there is Willie Howard in 
"Comes the Revolution," a screamingly 
funny comic skit. 

Complete information regarding 
Soundies can be had from Walter O. 
Gutlohn, Inc., 25 West 45th Street, 
New York. 




KIN-O-LUX 

MOVIE FILMS ARE BEING USED 
BY MORE CINE CAMERA USERS 




KIN-O-LUX, INC., 105 WEST 40th STREET, NEW YORK 




► OF MICE AND MEN 

Featuring Burgess Meredith, Betty Field, 
Lon Chaney, Jr. 

Dramatic picturization of John Steinbeck's ex- 
ceptional novel and prize-winning stage play. 
Tensely portrays migratory farm writers' strug- 
gles (or existence in a ceaseless search tor work. 

► A CHUMP AT OXFORD 

Featuring Stan Laurel and Oliier Hardy 
The riotously funny escapades of two lowly street 
cleaners who l~ng fcc the distinction of a college 
education. Presto! The wish comes true — the boys 
arrive ?i sedate Oxford — where a bevy of amaz- 
ingly ridiculous adventures make them really re- 
lieved to be bounced out cf college. 

Now Available: 

THE HOUSEKEEPER'S DAUGHTER 
with Joan Bennett. Adolphe Menjou 
THERE GOES MY HEART 
with Fredric March. Virginia Bruce 
' TOPPER TAKES A TRIP 

with Constance Bennett. Roland Young 
ZENOBIA (An Elephant Never Forgets) 
with Oliver Hardy. Harry Langdon 
CAPTAIN FURY 
..with Brian Aherne. Victor McLaglen J 

Other Outstanding "Hits'' Soon to Follow 
ORDER FROM YOUR FILM LIBRARY TODAY 

Write for Free Catalogue Listing Many 
Other Features and Shorts 
1 6mm. Sound Films 

POST PICTURES CORP. 

723 Seventh Ave. Dept. 14 New York. N . Y. 




New "Professional Jr." Tripod 

Worthwhile 14mm. filming, whether silent or 
sound, requires a sturdy yet versatile tripod 
built along professional lines. The new 
PROFESSIONAL JR." is built to precision 
standards, weighs but 14 lbs. Friction type 
head gives super-smooth pan and tilt action. 
"Spread-leg" design assures utmost rigidity 
and quick, positive height adjustment. Camera 
platform takes EK Cine Special, 8&H Filmo, 
Bolex or Berndt-Maurer Cameras; also adapt- 
able for 35mm. Eyemo, DeVry, etc. Used by 
the U. S. Gov't, leading 16mm producers and 
newsreel companies. 

Send for literature describing 14 features thoroughly. 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT CO. 

1600 Broadway New York, N. Y. 



PACE 54 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



Save 40% 

Originally Priced at $2.50 




The CI NEK IT contains 
one Combination Lens Hood 
and Filter Holder, and three 
unbreakable Color Filters: 
YELLOW 2X - RED 6X 
DAYLIGHT FILTER 

for converting type A Kodachrome 
to outdoor use. 

Our Low Price $]50 

■P/ui 10c for Mailing 

Send cash or money order 

LIMITED SUPPLY ! 

MALENA CO. 

616 Market St. - Phila.. Pa. 



EVERY 8MM. FAN WANTS 

CINE EXTENAR 

It's the new WIDE ANGLE 
lens that every cine fan 
needs to catch the whole 
picture. Simply screws 
over regular 8mm. Ie,ns, 
providing identical focus 
and definition plus a WIDE 
ANGLE. $27.50 
For full particulars, write today 

CAMERA SPECIALTY CO. 

48 West 29th Street New York City 




A BARREL OF LAUGHS! 




CARTOONS — COMEDIES 

Complete Edition 

8 MM $ 5.50 

16 MM 8.75 

16 MM. SOUND 17.50 

Dealer Discounts Available 
CERTIFIED FILM DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 

25 West 45th Street New York 



Kodachrome 

MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 
GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A Merchandise Mart, Chicago 



Jbolly &hot£ for better movie & . . . 



• Continued from Page 47 

birthday. The next time there's a birth- 
day to film at your house, mount your 
camera on a dolly and focus up close on 
the birthday cake. Shoot about five sec- 
onds of this, then have mother's hands 
enter the scene and pick up the cake. 
As she lifts it and starts to carry it to 
the table where the birthday party is 
in progress, move back with the camera 
and pan to follow her as she walks to- 
wards the door. Follow her by moving 
the dolly and continue filming until 
she reaches the door. Stop camera at 
this point and move camera into the 
next room on the other side of table. 
Continue filming as mother resumes her 
action of carrying cake to the table sur- 
rounded by expectant guests. 

One problem that arises in making 
dolly shots is that of keeping subject 
in sharp focus, especially where subject 
moves progressively away or toward the 
camera or where the dolly-mounted 
camera moves forward or away from 
the subject. The answer to the problem 
is to provide sufficient light in the scene 
to enable stopping down camera lens 
to gain maximum depth of focus. 

As an example, suppose we have a 
subject or bit of action which we want 



to film with a dolly-in movement of 
the camera. We'll start filming at a dis- 
tance of ten feet from subject, then 
move camera forward to a distance of 
three and a half feet of subject. This 
presents a problem of keeping the sub- 
ject in sharp focus during the entire 
time camera is traveling from the ten- 
foot mark. 

Under inadequate light conditions 
which would require using a stop of 
say f/ i.j, depth of focus would be very 
limited. It would be necessary to set 
the lens at ten feet for beginning the 
shot, and to gradually change focus of 
the lens while the camera was being 
moved toward subject. 

On the other hand, if we are able to 
use an opening of f 8, depth of focus 
will be considerably improved. By set- 
ting focus at ten feet to begin the shot, 
it can be left at that point for duration 
of the shot because of the increased 
depth of focus which renders the sub- 
ject sharp regardless whether the cam- 
era is ten or three and a half-feet from 
subject . 

A depth of focus chart for both 
8mm. and 16mm. camera lenses is given 



FOR 8 MM. CAMERA 



DEPTH Of FIELD TABLE AND HYPERFOCAL DISTANCES 
fl.9 — Vi" Comero Lens with Focusing Mount 


Distance 
Focused 
Upon 


Fl.9 


F2.7 


F3.5 


F4 


F5.6 


F8 


Fll 


FI6 


1 Foot 


vnw' - r\iw 


u'llW'-O'H'A" 


0'll"-ri" 


0'1l"l'IVi" 


o'io'/<"-ri%" 


0*10" -1*244" 


fwr-rw 


r«4" - 1TV4" 


2 Feet 


no- - r i" 


1'8" - 2*3" 


,. . r j.. 


1*7"- 2*5" 


I* 7" - 2' 9" 


1' 6" - 3' 2" 


I' 4" - 4'2" 


|« 2"-S* 


3 Feet 


2' 8" - 3' 6" 


2'5"- 3*7" 


2' 5"- 4' 


2*3" - 4*2" 


2' 2" - 4*11" 


I'll" - 16* 


1' 8" - I8'3" 


1* 5"- Inf. 


4 Feet 


3' S" - 4*10" 


3'2". 5*4" 


3' - S'll" 


2'9" - 6'6" 


2* 7"- 8* S" 


2' 3" - 15*11" 


1*11" - Inf. 


1' 7" - Inf. 


6 Feet 


4' 9" - 8" 2" 


4'3" - 9*8" 


4' -11*10" 


3'9" - 14'2" 


3' 4" - 28' 6" 


2*10" - Inf. 


2* 4" - Inf. 


110" - Inf. 


8 Feet 


5*11" - 12' 5" 


5*3" - 16*6" 


4'10" - 23' 2" 


4'6" - 34*6" 


3'1I" - Inf. 


3* 2" - Inf. 


2* 7" - Inf. 


2* 1" - Inf. 


12 Feet 


8' 2" - 26' 6" 


6*7" - 54'3" 


5'10" - Inf. 


S'6" - Inf. 


4' 6" - Inf. 


3* 7" - Inf. 


2' 9" - Inf. 


2* 2" - Inf. 


IS Feet 


9* -45' 


7'6" - Inf. 


6" 9" - Inf. 


6'1" - Inf. 


5' 1" - Inf. 


4' 2" - Inf. 


3' 1" - Inf. 


2' 3" - Inf. 


2 5 Feet 


ll'IO" - Inf. 


9'5" - Inf. 


8' 2" - Inf. 


7'4" - Inf. 


5*10"- Inf. 


4* 7" - Inf. 


3* 4" - Inf. 


2' 5" - Inf. 


SO r«i 


15' 6" - Inf. 


11 "7"- Inf. 


9'10" - Inf. 


8*6" - Inf. 


6' 4" - Inf. 


4* 7" - Inf. 


3' 5" - Inf. 


2' S" . Inf. 


Hyperfocal 
Distance 


21 "9" 


1S'4" 


U'9" 


10*4*" 


7*4" 


5*2" 


3*7" 


2'6" 


t2.7 and f3.5 Vl" Camera Lens — Universal — (Fixed) Focus 




F2.7 


F3.S 


F4 


F5.6 


F8 


Fll 


F16 


7'9" - Inf. 


7*3" - Inf. 


6*5" - Inf. 


5'4" - Inf. 


<T4" - Int. 


3*2" - Inf. 


2*4" - Inf. 



FOR 16 MM. CAMERA 



DEPTH OF FIELD TABLES AND HYPERFOCAL DISTANCES 
fl.S — 1" Camera Lens with Focusing Mount 


Distance 
Focused 
Upon 


Fl.S 


F2.7 


F3.5 


F4 


F4.5 


F6.3 


F8 


Fll. 3 


2 Feet 


I'lO". 2*1" 


1*8"- 2* 4" 


1' 7" - 2*4" 


1' 7" - 2*5" 


1' 7" - 2' 6" 


1*6" - 2*10" 


1' 5" - 3'2" 


1* 1- - 4*4" 


3 Feet 


2*11"- 3*4" 


2*6" - 3* 8" 


2* 4"- 4' 


2" 4" - 4*2" 


2' 2" - 4' 5" 


2* - 5* 6" 


I'll" - 7*1" 


1* 7" - Inf. 


4 Feet 


3* 5" - 4*7" 


3*2"- 5' 5" 


2' 6" - 6' 


2*10" - 6*6" 


2-10" - 7' 1" 


2*5" - 10' 5" 


2' 2" - 17*4" 


1*1 1" - Inf. 


6 Feet 


4'11"- 7*7" 


4'4". 9' 8" 


3*11" - 12'!" 


3*10" - 14T* 


3' 7"- 16'J1" 


3*1" - 78' 


2' 8" - Inf. 


2* 2" - Inf. 


8 Feet 


6' 7"- 11*2" 


5*2" - 16' 7" 


4' 8" - 24*S" 


4' 6" - 34'7" 


4* 2" - 57' 2" 


3'6" - Inf. 


3' 1"- Inf. 


2* 6" - Inf. 


12 Feet 


8' 5" 21*1" 


6'8" -64'H" 


5'1l" - Inf. 


5' 6" - Inf. 


5' 2" - Inf. 


4*2" - Inf. 


3' 7" - Inf. 


2*10** - Inf. 


18 Feet 


11' - 54'!" 


8*4" - Inf. 


7* 2" - Inf. 


6* 8" - Inf. 


6' 2" - Inf. 


4*8" - Inf. 


4' - Inf. 


3' - Inf. 


25 Feet 


13* 1" - 256' 


9'6" - Inf. 


8* - Inf. 


7' 4" - Inf. 


6*10" - Inf. 


5*1" - Inf. 


4' 4" - Inf. 


3" 4" - Inf. 


Hyperfocal 
Distance 


27 8" 


15'5" 


11*11" 


10*5" 


9*4" 


6'6» 


5*2- 


3*8" 


f2.7 and f3.5 — 1" Camera Lens — Universal — (Fixed) Focus 




F2.7 


F3.5 | F4 F4.5 


F6.3 


F8 


Ft 1.3 


8*4" - Inf. 


7*2" - Inf. | JS'8" - Inf. i 6'2" - Inf. 


4*7" - Inf. 


4' - Inf. 


3' - Inf. 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PAGE 55 



here as a means of ready reference for 
those amateurs interested in making 
dolly shots as suggested here. It shows 
the nearest and farthest boundaries of 
the area of sharp focus for various stops 
of the lens, and these represent the lim- 
its within which the camera may travel 
in a dolly shot and remain in sharp 
focus. 

Showmanship . . . 

• Continued from Page 44 

light from near the base of lamphouse. 
If your's is a projector of this type, 
set to work to correct the evil now. 
A suitable baffle may be constructed 
fiom a tin can and fitted over top of 
lamp house to deflect the light, yet not 
interfere with the cooling system. An- 
other expedient is to set up projector 
in a hall or the next room, away from 
the audience, and project through a 
door. It is to be hoped that new models 
of projectors will have this light-leak 
fault eliminated. 

Where an outside audience is expect- 
ed, projector should be set up well in 
advance and its good running order in- 
sured. It should be focused in advance 
and properly centered on the screen. 
Nor should the possibility of blowing 
the projection bulb be overlooked. A 
spare bulb is a good investment. 

Few of us ever check our projectors 
often enough for such important things 
as oiling, cleaning film gate, polishing 
lens, and weak take-up belts. A careful 
check-up should be part of the prelimi- 
naries to showing pictures. If left until 
after the show, we usually become oc- 
cupied with our guests and the chore 
put off until some other time. 

Today, musical background is almost 
a must for home movies projection and 
where equipment exists for playing ordi- 
nary phonograph records, a selection of 
orchestral recordings should be chosen 
in keeping with subject of films to be 
shown and these played, carefully cued, 
during projection. Dual turntables are 
not absolutely necessary. A single phon- 
ograph or radio-phonograph combina- 
tion will serve the purpose, providing 
another person can be assigned the re- 
sponsibility of playing the records as 
required. 

Control of room lights should be in 
hands of the projectionist and, there- 
fore, there should be some sort of a re- 
mote switching arrangement near the 
projector that permits turning room 
lights off or on at the proper time. Most 
practical system is to utilize a single 
fioor or bridge lamp for lighting the 
room. Either have this lamp near the 
projector or provide a switch at the 
projector that will control it. The right 
attention to this detail will prevent the 



annoyance of some member of the fam- 
ily, eager to be helpful, snapping on 
the light during a fadeout, thinking the 
picture is ended. 

Less annoyance to audience from pro- 
jector noise and light will result if pro- 
jector is set at some distance back from 
the spectators. Where the room is small, 
the projector may be isolated somewhat 
by elevating it above spectator's heads, 
placing it upon a box set upon a table 
or desk, etc. 

The program itself should not be too 
long. It is better to leave an audience 
wishing for more than to tire it with 
too long a showing of pictures. Save 
your best film for the last and show 
short subjects and less interesting ma- 
terial first. 

We should all be keen to observe an 
audience's reaction to our films as they 
are being projected. The questions they 
ask, the suggestions they make, their 
applause all can be helpful in improving 
our future picture making. But to 
bring out the critical best in an audi- 
ence, our pictures must be screened with 
the best showmanship at our command. 



eviewA 



• • • 



• Continued from Page 3 S 

overdone, become tiresome, and there- 
fore lose much of their punch. The film 
can be improved by shortening most 
scenes. 

Best comedy is in scene where the 
golfer finally gets ball in cup, then 
caps it quickly with his hat. There is 
need to re-edit closing sequences of pic- 
ture, especially where woman is shown 
re-acting to crash of golf ball through 
her window. This scene is cut in about 
three shots too late. It should follow, 
immediately, shot of golfer making the 
drive that results in crash. Also, scene 
showing woman calling after retreat- 
ing golfer and caddy is too long. Her 
calling is repetitious. But this easily can 
be corrected by cutting the scene in 
half. 

A few tight closeups showing ball 
falling from the tee, instead of pictur- 
ing this action in a medium shot, would 
aid this gag materially. The sepia ton- 
ing given the film is a splendid job and 
adds much in interest to picture. The 
film was awarded a two-star merit 
leader. 

When Mr. and Mrs. Al Morton 
submitted their film "The Ardent 
Amateur" in Home Movies' 1942 con- 
test, they placed several judges on a 
spot in the final analysis of contest 
films. The film had all the earmarks 
of a winner, yet because of some errors 
in editing, they could not conscienti- 
ously acclaim it a winner. Nevertheless, 
it received honorable mention. The Mor- 



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DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each 35 

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Not all months in any year, 1940-41-42 30 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS — Each 

Double 8 50c Univex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS, Double 8mm. and Single 8 size. 10c 

100 ft. and 50 ft. 16mm 15c 

MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FIILM 
Speed 6 in. Photoflood Light. Laboratory Packed. 
Dbl. 8—33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; 400 ft. $5.50; 
Sgl. 8—33 ft. 45c; 100 ft. $1.00; 400 ft. $3.50; 
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Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




8mm.- 1 4mm. -35mm. 
KODACHROME 

OF THE BEAUTIFUL 

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100 Ft. 16mm. KODACHROME P P 10.00 
50 Ft. 16mm. KODACHROME 0 A 6.00 
50 Ft. 8mm. KODACHROME S I 6.00 

$8 Ft. 8mm. KODACHROME T D 3.50 

LURAY CAVERNS, Bx. 1 076, Luray, Va. 



NEW! 



KODACHROME 
SLIDES 

eMutosUcal 

Philadelphia 

Beautiful 35mm. Koda- 
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of Independence Hall, 
interior views of the 
Declaration Chamber and Liberty Bell, 
Betsy Ross House (exterior and interior), 
Carpenters Hall, and others. 50 cents each. 
Send for free list. 



KLEIN & GOODMAN 

18 S. 10th Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 




16MM. KODACHROME 

"END" titles: 3 for $1.00. With fadeout, 50e each. 
"YOSEMITE" and "BLOOMING DESERT." each 
100 ft., $18.00; 200 ft.. $36.00. "THE CANADIAN 
ROCKIES," 400 ft. (dupe). $60.00. 
ROBINS' NEST sequence. 31 feet. $5.00. KODA- 
SL1DES, 50c each, of above subjects and others. 

GUY D. HASELTON 

7936 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



Notice to Movie Fans 

If you take movies (8mm or 16mm) you simply cannot 
afford to be without a Free copy of the latest Photo Bar- 
gain Book now being* distributed throughout the V. >. 
Lists all the best moving picture equipment from all 
the leading: manufacturers, describes them. The prices 
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CENTRAL CAMERA COMPANY 
23.0 S. Wabash Dept. B-9 Chicago, Illinois 



PAGE 56 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 




A Buy at $1.75 . . . 

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ESO-B — Super-orthochromatic film, full anti-halo protec- 
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fast as ESO-A. Weston 12-4. $1.25 per spool. $3.45 per 
three spools. 

ESO-C — Sepia ortho film .with full anti-halo base. Pro- 
jects as an attractive, warm amber. Excellent supple- 
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per spool. $3.70 per three spools. 

ESO-D — Violet ortho film, anti-halo base. Excellent for 
splicing into your Kodachrome movies. Weston 8-2. 
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ESO-G — A scarlet semi-orthochromatlc film with full 
anti-halo base. Recommended for exteriors only. Pro- 
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for Kodachrome movies. Also for titling color movies. 
Weston 8-2. $1.25 per spool. $3.35 per three spools. 

• These emulsions available for single-run 8mm. Vnivex 
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Ask for your Fall catalog of short subject films, spooled 

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ESO-S PICTURES 



3945 Central Street 



Kansas City. Missouri 




Bass, that good 
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PRESIDENT 

• Headquarters for new and used 
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Write Dept. HM 




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Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A MERCHANDISE MART 
CHICAGO 



tons have polished up the film con- 
siderably and we were privileged to re- 
view it again, noting considerable im- 
provement. 

Running 400 feet in 8mm. Koda- 
chrome, story concerns an ardent movie 
amateur eager to make good movies 
without spending necessary time in pre- 
liminary study. He buys camera, film 
and other equipment and makes all the 
usual mistakes of the careless beginner. 
Undaunted by his first failure, he buys 
more film, listens to some advice from 
his camera dealer and goes forth to 
shoot again. When the film's returned 
from the lab, he summons his neighbors 
for a "premiere." The picture turns out 
to be a conglomeration of brief snap 
shots and wild panoramas. 

Next day he receives as a gift from 
one of his friends, a copy of Eastman's 
book "How to Make Good Movies." 
After studying this, he tries again, and 
screens the results for his friends. Of 



course his friends recognize the im- 
provement and the story ends with 
everyone happy. 

The additional editing done on this 
picture has improved it immensely, 
making for a smoother, more interest- 
ing continuity. It is a splendid example 
of what judicious use of fades and lap- 
dissolves can do to "up" the quality 
oi continuity. Closeups were used fre- 
quently and effectively to emphasize 
important points in the story. 

Commendable, too, is the fine light- 
ing of interiors and the nice job of 
titling*, in which department the Mor- 
tons usually excel. The story is told 
superbly with a minimum of titles. 

In our opinion, the story would get 
off to a faster start if the earlier se- 
quences of the amateur's filming activi- 
ties were depicted in quick flashes and 
dissolves or in montage, similar to a 
treatment used later in the picture. 

"Ardent Amateur" easily rated the 
3 -star merit leader awarded it. 



(Bird life (liming . . . 



• Continued from Page 41 

them otherwise is a waste of good film. 

The bird subjects of my film were 
photographed in my backyard, on the 
front lawn, and on vacation trips and 
local hikes. Some of my most interest- 
ing shots also were filmed in nearby bird 
sanctuaries, on farms and at the local 
zoo. At first, I had no idea of making 
a story or even obtaining sequences of 
shots. This, I knew, would be difficult 
with a subject of this kind. But it hap- 
pened that just the ordinary action of 
the subjects, filmed at close range, pro- 
vided enough interest to insure audience 
appeal. 

One need not go far to find odd or 
unusual birds for a reel on this subjects. 
The commonest sparrow, if captured 
close-up in the right setting with a tel- 
ephoto lens, will prove as interesting as 
its rarer contemporaries. Some Satur- 
day afternoon when your camera's load- 
ed with film and your trigger finger's 
itching, go out into your yard and set 
up the camera on a tripod or other solid 
support close to the ground. Scatter a 
few crumbs on the ground as bait and 
focus camera upon them. 

If you haven't built a remote control 
for your camera, such as the one re- 
ferred to earlier, conceal yourself and 
camera with limbs from trees or brush. 
When the birds swoop down to feed 
upon the crumbs, start your camera. 

We don't mean to imply that all 
bird shots should be screen-fillers al- 
though the huge closeups are by far the 
most interesting. Where lack of a re- 
mote control, or telephoto lens makes 
close-up filming impossible, good shots 



may be made by exercising patience. 
This is intended as a "casual" bird film- 
ing project in which we shall try to 
get rare bird shots with the equipment 
we have and this, of course, requires 
plenty of time and study of bird's hab- 
its. Once a bird's habits are studied 
and understood, we know just how 
close we can approach in the open to 
photograph it. 

A bird bath is a "natural" location 
for filming birds. One of my most in- 
teresting shots is of a young robin per- 
forming his abolutions in the terra cot- 
ta bath that occupies a secluded niche 
in a nearby garden. On another occa- 
sion, I filmed another robin who chanced 
upon a pool of water that settled in our 
lawn while the sprinklers were on. I 
shot about 20 feet of this action while 
sitting on the back steps no more than 
ten feet away. I used my telephoto, too, 
supporting the camera by resting my el- 
bows on my knees. Neither my pres- 
ence nor the sound of the camera mo- 
tor seemed to distract the bird. 

Closeups reveal surprising coloring 
in the plumage of such common birds as 
sparrows and starlings. House wrens, 
while not very colorful, prove interest- 
ing because they are so tame. It is us- 
ually possible to approach within eight 
feet of them. 

The logical time for filming birds, of 
course, is in the springtime when nescs 
are being built. Often it is possible to 
film the complete mating cycle, from 
nest building to rearing of the young 
fledglings as was done by Dr. Cassell of 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PACE 57 



Los Angeles and Mrs. Warner Seely of 
Cleveland, Ohio, both of whom have 
produced rare films of Hummingbirds. 

Domestic birds such as canaries, 
chickens, pigeons, ducks, geese, etc., 
while more familiar to the average per- 
son, somehow command added interest 
when filmed and projected on the 
screen. An amusing sequence in my reel 
is a shot of a flock of young ducklings 
only a few days old. To get the action 
I wanted, I tossed a large worm into 
the pen before starting the camera. 
Plenty of action resulted as the duck- 
lings staged a tug of war with the de- 
lectable morsel. Realizing an opportun- 
ity in this rare scene, I flipped the cam- 
era speed control for another shot, and 
filmed the action again in slow motion. 

Bird scenes, filmed casually, can be 
made to hang together in a semblance 
of sequences through the use of titles 
thoughtfully composed. A little humor 
injected in title composition as inspired 
by the action, will do much to heighten 
interest. The main thing, of course, is to 
have made the bird shots interesting. 
Toward this end our last, but by no 
means least important, suggestion is to 
film birds against carefully chosen back- 
grounds — backgrounds of neutral col- 
orings or of color or composition that 
sets off rather than absorbs the subject. 
To do this, of course, requires added 
patience — a virtue you must have plen- 
ty of if you would be a successful cine- 
rilmer of birds. 



ZJelephoto 

J£en£e& . . . 

• Continued from Page 46 

right. As it passes immediately in front 
of the camera it completely fills the 
frame and then rapidly diminishes in 
size as it passes and disappears in the 
distance to the left. This is demon- 
strated in Fig. 4. 

By using a telephoto lens on the same 
shot, the plane would appear on the 
screen to change little in size during 
the entire panorama shot although it 
may have traveled the same distance 
as when photographed with the regular 
lens as shown in Fig. 5. This is because 
the field of view limits of the telephoto 
are considerably farther away from the 
camera but closer to the plane as when 
the regular lens is used. 

Telephoto lenses for cine cameras ex- 
ist in two different constructions. In 
the same focal length, there is the true 
telephoto and the simple long focus 
lens. The true telephoto type lens is 
a lens so constructed that it is placed 
closer to the film plane than its actual 
focal length. In other words, a six-inch 
telephoto might extend only three or 
four inches from the camera while a 
simple long focus lens would extend the 
full six inches from the film. Telephoto 
lenses are of more complicated and cost- 



Movie of the Month 



• Each month the editors of HOME 
MOVIES select the best picture sent in 
for analysis and designate it "The Movie 
of the Month." This movie is given a 
detailed review and a special leader is 
awarded the maker. 

This award does not affect the eligi- 
bility of such films for entry in the an- 
nual HOME MOVIES CONTEST. They 
are automatically entered for rejudging 
with those films submitted especially for 
the annual contest. Films awarded the 
honor of MOVIE OF THE MONTH dur- 
ing the past 12 months are: 

1942 

FEBRUARY: "The Story Yosemite 
Tells," produced by George L. Rankin, 
San Francisco, Calif. A 16mm Koda- 
chrome picture, 400 feet in length. 

MARCH: "Snap Happy," produced by 
Ted Ceurts, Salt Lake City, Utah. A 
16mm Kodachrome production, 700 feet 
in length. 

APRIL: "Rita of Rocky Ranch," pro- 
duced by Roland Ray, Los Angeles, 
Calif. An 8mm. picture, 400 feet in 
length. 

MAY: "Oliver Twist," produced by 
David E. Bradley, Winnetka, Illinois. A 
16mm. picture approximately 4000 



feet in length. 

JUNE: "A Day On the Western 
Front," produced by Ernest Eroddy, 
Denver, Colorado. An 8mm. Koda- 
chrome picture, 200 feet in length. 

JULY: "White Waters" produced by 
C. A. Willis, Merced, Calif. A 16mm. 
Kodachrome picture, 400 feet in 
length. 

AUGUST: "Madame Hummer At 
Home," produced by Mrs. Warner 
Seely, Cleveland, Ohio. A 16mm. Kod- 
achrome picture, 800 feet in length. 

SEPTEMBER: "Murder By Magic," 
produced by Ad-libber Productions, 
Pasadena, Calif. An 8mm. picture, 300 
feet in length. 

OCTOBER: "Pottery Making As a 
Hobby," produced by V. L. Saint, Lyons, 
Kansas. A 1 6mm. Kodachrome picture, 
400 feet in length. 

NOVEMBER: (No award) . 

DECEMBER: "Mister X," produced 
by Norman Brown, Glendale, Calif. An 
8mm. Kodachrome picture, 200 feet in 
length. 

1943 

JANUARY: No award. 



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(If desired, Kodachrome users 
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PAGE 58 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



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Distinctive TITLES 
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For the Amateur and Professional 
16MM. — 3 MM. 
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ly construction and their advantage 
over the long focus lens is that they are 
less bulky. Otherwise, both types give 
about the same photographic results. 

Many amateurs have constructed 
their own long focus lenses, using the 
lens from a still camera. An extension 
tube, threaded to fit lens seat of the 
camera and mounted with a two- or 
three-inch still camera lens on the op- 
posite end, comprises a simple long fo- 
cus lens. The camera lens, of course, 
must be focused on infinity. 

The use of a telephoto lens definitely 
rtquires the use of a tripod in filming, 
otherwise any motion or vibration in 
the camera while filming, no matter 
how slight, is magnified in the screen 



results in proportion to the lens length. 

Another necessity in using telephotos 
on distant outdoor vistas is a filter to 
minimize haze. With Kodachrome film, 
the usual Kodachrome haze filter 
should be used. With black and white 
panchromatic film, a light yellow filter 
is the one to use. A point to remember 
is that the longer the telephoto lens the 
greater is the diffusion caused by at- 
mospheric haze. 

As to which size telephoto is the best 
choice for the average movie amateur, 
this depends upon the average use to 
which it will be put. It is generally con- 
ceded that the 2-inch telephoto (or its 
equivalent, the i-in. lens, in 8mm.) is 
Sest for general all around use. 



cAmateur casting, problem* 



• Continued from Page 4I 

to look like the accepted movie stand- 
ard of doctors. The moment he appears 
cn the screen, he is recognized as a doc- 
tor without necessity of dialog or ex- 
planation. And so with other types. 
The young and innocent maiden wears 
gingham dresses while the vixen lures in 
shiny silks and satins. The hero is im- 
mediately distinguishable from the 
menace. 

If we cast a backwoodsman, a lum- 
berjack or a trapper without a good 
growth of beard, for example, he will 
fail by this lack of costume detail, to 
impress the audience as he would if 
correctly made up. 

On the subject of holding a cast to- 
gether for duration of picture produc- 
tion, the first requirement is to choose 
actors who are sufficiently adult-mind- 
ed to realize their obligation, once the 
picture is started. Of course, the pro- 
ducer must not take advantage by 
scheduling shooting at odd times of day 
or on days of the week when, to take 
part in the picture, would interfere 
?.ith an actor's occupation or his fam- 
ily obligations. This includes shooting 
every night in the week and especially 
into the small hours of the morning. 

If the producer will talk over with 
his prospective cast before starting to 
shoot and impress upon them the fact 
he's investing money in valuable film : 
tell them that all principals, once they 
begin, must agree to stick with the pro- 
duction until complete, come high wa- 
ter or what, little difficulty will be en- 
countered. Often a misunderstanding 
or uninformed wife will intrude in the 
middle of a production to cause a mem- 
ber to be tardy or remain away alto- 
gether. A situation like this calls for kid 
gloves. Usually if the wife is invited to 
accompany her husband or to take part 
in the production, the difficulty can be 
overcome. 



Keeping atmosphere or bit player 
groups intact is often a matter of fur- 
nishing amusement or even food and 
drink with which to while away the 
tedious hours between shots. 

Once, when we needed an unusual 
number of people for a mob scene in 
"Peer Gynt," we arranged a picnic 
in a nearby woods where the scenes 
were laid and invited as many of the 
teen age girls and boys of the neighbor- 
hood as we could reach. Costumes were 
prepared in advance for them and the 
turnout, in fact the results, were even 
better than anticipated. 

You can always get a group of peo- 
ple together to eat even though they 
are not interested in an acting career. 

T)itle 
developing, . . . 

• Continued from Page 49 

reduce the remaining silver salts and 
leave the film ready for projection. In 
a fresh solution, two minutes should be 
sufficient. As the hypo solution is used, 
this time should be gradually increased. 
It will be noted that the film upon be- 
ing placed in the fixing solution is of 
a yellowish color. This color slowly dis- 
appears in the hypo solution. At this 
point the film is but half "fixed" and 
it should remain in the hypo solution 
for a period twice as long as it requires 
to clear the emulsion. Final step is to 
wash the film in clear running water 
20 to 30 minutes then hang it up to dry 
in a dust-proof room. Where possible, 
water remaining on the film should be 
absorbed by wiping the film with a bit 
of clean cotton or a viscose sponge. 

The film should be allowed to dry 
thoroughly for 24 hours before the ti- 
tles are cut apart and spliced. 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PACE 59 



Zoo filming, for all . 



• Continual 1 1 om Page 4) 

so much bright light intervenes be- 
tween the meter and subject, giving an 
erroneous light reading. Best rule is to 
take a reading of a nearby object in 
shade when the subject to be filmed is 
in shade. 

There is always the probability of en- 
countering large crowds of visitors 
about the zoo exhibits which will bring 
the temptation to rush the shooting. 
The wise cameraist will take his time, 
seek the most advantageous camera an- 
gle and shoot leisurely. In actual shoot- 
ing where regulations, large crowds, 
etc., prevent using tripod, other sources 
of camera support should be found and 
used. An unsteady camera will definite- 
ly mar the best cine subject regardless 
of its interest. In this connection, a 
unipod — a one-legged camera support — 
is an excellent accessory and its use is 
often permitted where ordinary tripods 
are restricted. 

Many amateur zoological films are 
spoiled by the fact that the animals, 
etc., are heavily screened by bars and 
the heavy wire mesh of their cages. In 
some instances it is often possible to so 
place the camera that the lens will miss 
the wire or bar, especially where the 



camera can be set up close to the en- 
closure. Where this is impossible, often 
a word to the zoo keeper, if the day 
is not a busy one, will bring the desired 
result in a more advantageous camera 
location. 

One thing to remember is that if lens 
is placed near the fine mesh netting of 
an enclosure, the closeness will result 
in a definite soft focus effect which 
may not be noticeable on the screen. 
Where large wire mesh or bars make up 
the enclosure or cage, careful framing 
and exact finder work will enable the 
scene to be satisfactorily masked with- 
out obscuring the object to be filmed. 

In such instances, parallax errors are 
liable to result in cutting off essentials 
of the scene or subject; therefore the 
filmer should be fully familiar with the 
field-of-view of his lens with relation 
to that seen in his viewfinder. 

The effort should always be made 
to film zoo subjects as naturally as pos- 
sible, an effect which is only possible 
by a thorough preliminary study of the 
location and of the inhabitants to be 
filmed. When editing, cutting should 
be done carefully to preserve a balance 
between long, medium and closeup 
shots. 



%Vken to uie cloie-upi . . 



• Continued from Page 4} 

of fine closeups that showed every par- 
ticular and device of the potter's tech- 
nique. 

In most cases, the action pictured in 
a closeup should first be introduced in 
one or more preceding medium or long 
shots. The preceding shots establish lo- 
cale and set the stage for the action that 
is to follow. The closer shots empha- 
size and bring the action to a climax. 
Sometimes, this technique is reversed. 
A sequence will begin with a closeup 
and the camera will move progressively 
farther away until the entire setting 
is revealed. This tactic is often em- 
ployed where it is desired to inject an 
air of mystery into the story at the very 
beginning. 

One such sequence in a recent ama- 
teur picture opened with a closeup of 
a partially opened door. A hand clasping 
a revolver is thrust through the open- 
ing and pulls the trigger. The door 
slowly closes and the next scene is a 
closeup of the assassin's feet walking 
quickly along a corridor. The full set- 
ting of the action is not revealed until 



the next scene — a medium shot of an 
office with the victim of the gunman 
slumped across a desk. 

Closeups of such action as a hand 
ringing a doorbell; the posting of a 
letter; writing a note, etc., are all too 
familiar, yet few amateurs film these 
shots with the artistry required to make 
them fully effective. There's a knack 
in choosing the right camera angle and 
lighting the closeup scene for maximum 
results. 

Here again we must repeat an oft- 
voiced admonition to the amateur: 
study the professional's closeup tech- 
niques on the screen. One picture rec- 
ommended for careful study is "Tales 
of Manhattan" which is remarkable for 
its use of closeups to heighten story 
interest. 

Regardless what subject the amateur 
undertakes to film, closeups will make 
it better. Babies, friends, picnics, trav- 
els — all require those intimate closeup 
shots to make them more entertaining 
on the screen. 



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Bookshelf size for reels or cans. Blue, green 
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No 400 for nine 200-foot 8mm. reels $1.50 

No. 700 for seven 400-ft. 16mm. reels 1.95 

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Free Catalog of Amfiles for Slides, Negatives, etc. 



AMBERG FILE & INDEX CO. U3£SrLS± 



S-T-R-E-T-C-H your film — use 

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No film wasted by jarring; remote control simplifies 
single frame exposures; adaptor easily attached and 
detached; no interference with other camera functions. 
Cable NOT included. 

MODELS: Revere 88. Filmo Companion and Sportster. 
PRICE : $1.00 plus tax in Calif. (If you send 
stamps, please send WAR SAVINGS STAMPS..) 

Garmur Products " 0 6073 Metropolitan 
uarmur rroaucrs sta Los An , eles Calif 

Alto: MATU8 CAMERA SUPPLY COMPANY 
3208 Wilshlre Boulevard Los Angelet. Calif. 





PROTECT FILMS 


AGAINST 1 
CLIMATE, 
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HOVIIS <*i«^f STIU.S 

ASK YOUR DEALER OR PHOTOFINISHER 
VAPORATECO.. INC.* BELL ft HOWELL CO. 
130 W. 46th St. 1801 Larchmont. Chicago 
New York City 716 N. Labrea. Hollywood 


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3827 ARCHER AVE., CHICAGO 




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HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



CLOSEOUT 



16MM. SOUND FILM 

Limited Quantity on Hand 

Hpver b«tnrp — anrl probably nev»r aoa'" will iiJPh j, 
m'nev-^aving opportunity bf oftpr^H on 16mm Sound 
Film. If* the "buy" nl the vear All film ouaran- 
tetd perfect. 

800 ft.— EXPLORING THE COFFEE CONTINENT' 

An exciting airplane trip aciuss the Andei — Musical 
background. interesting — Educational 517 50 
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800 ft.— "PARADE OF CHAMPIONS" 

tpoit' evenu on Review, a film $12 50 

everyone will enj..> * 

SPECIAL— WHILE THEY LAST 
ISO ft— "LIFE OF EDWARD" (16mm. SILENT* 

Highlights in tlie llle ol the popular 89c 

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equipment bargains. 

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Superior Bulk Film 'P"*-'*,-.! 1 

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Reversible Film, 100 Ft. $2.00 
8mm. Double, 25 Ft $1.00 

PRICES INCLUDE PROCESSING 

Silly Symphonic). Charlie Chaplin and other 
feature! at mi per foot tor complete tubjert. 
Write today for our catalogue of finished luhjecli. 

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with BLACK and WHITE fine 
grain Seml-Orthoehromatic Re- 
versible Film for finest results — 

lowest cost. 
16mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

100-ft Roll, only $2.50 

Rating Seheiner 18 
8mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

25 ft. Double 8, only, $1.25 
16mm Projection Reel— 200 ft. 
reel — 35e each. 
Minimum order 6 reels 
Write for prices for developing 
and processing for 8mm. and 
16mm. films bought elsewhece. 

VISUAL INSTRUCTION 
SUPPLY CORP. 

1757 Broadway. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dept. 12 




636 Ninth Ave 



Film Center Bldg . N. Y. C. 



er i 



Do You Process? 

// M/ and live in reader Hughes ri- 
cinity, perhaps this uill start you on a 
mutual friend shift: 

Gentlemen: I would like to get in 
touch with other movie amateurs liv- 
ing in or near Madison, Wise, who pro- 
cess their own films. — /. E. Hughes, 
m E. Main St., Madison, Wise. 

Swappers 

Gentlemen: I would like to hear from 
movie amateurs or others who can 
supply me with i6mm. Kodachrome 
footage of the following subjects: Cot- 
ton fields in bloom; cotton being picked; 
cotton on way to the cotton gin and 
the actual process at gin; and cotton 
being baled and sent to warehouses. — 
Kenneth C. Ring, c o Ferr-\-Hanly Co., 
iii W. Monroe St., Chicago, III. 

Sirs: I would like to obtain 150 feet 
or more of 8mm. Kodachrome of the 
Washington State Fair held at Puyallup, 
\X r ash., 1 94 1. Will have print made and 
return original if necessary. — Alfred 
Bartel, Jr., 275 San Jose Aie., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Sirs: Would like to contact someone 
in vicinity of West Brownsville, Pa., to 
film about 50 feet of 8mm. Kodachrome 
for me. I would like shots of the bridge, 
dam, old school house and other points 
of interest. Will swap exposed film or 
make any reasonable arrangement. — 
Roy D. Abbott, 320-/A W. Chevy 
Chase, Glendale, Calif. 

Sirs: Want 8mm. Kodachrome shots 
up to fifty feet of the Williamsburg 
Pvestoration and College of Williams and 
Mary in Virginia. — Hugh C. Newton, 
727 No. Monroe St., Lapeer, Mich. 

Sirs: I am engaged in extending my 
library of 16mm. Kodachrome films and 
want to swap footage for shots of Ha- 
waii, Yellowstone National Park, Flow- 
ers and Birds, Animal Life, and Au- 
tumn color scenes. — Joseph A. Wensk, 
413 So. Paca St., Baltimore, Md. 

Sirs: Would like to obtain some 8mm. 
footage of Yellowstone Park in black 
and white or Kodachrome. — Earl She- 
phan, 132 Oakuood, Louisiille, Ky. 

Sirs: Want black and white or Koda- 
chrome footage of state of Oregon. 
Please write and describe and state 
whether 8mm. or 16mm. — Verne Rich- 
ards, sio-Yt 7 Lemon St., Lancaster, Pa. 



WILLO 

ALL- GEAR TRIPOD 

A REVOLUTIONARY 
COMBINATION 




The rapidity with which this outfit can be 
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TITLE 
CENTERING 
GUIDES 

for all popular makes of 8mm. and 

16mm. cameras 
IN PAMPHLET FORM . . 10c EACH 

Now ready for the following cameras: 

Revere 8mm. (All models) — 8mm. 
Magazine Cine Kodak — Single-lens 
8mm. Filmo — 8mm. Turret Filmo 
8mm. Cine Kodaks 20, 25 and 60 — 
8mm. Keystone — 16mm. Cine Ko- 
dak K— 16mm. Model 70 Filmos — 
121 Filmo — 141 Filmo — Cine Ko- 
dak E — Cine Kodak K. — 16mm. 
Victor — 16mm. Keystone, Models 
A3, A7 and Bl. 

Be Sure to Specify Make and Model 
and Camera When Ordering. 

HOME MOVIES MAGAZINE 

6060 Sunset Blvd.. Hollywood. Calif. 



Complete Rental Library 

16mm. — Low Rates — 8mm. 

Send 10 Cents for NEW Catalogue 

BIGGER THAN EVER 

NATIONAL CINEMA SERVICE 



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worth 2-6049 



HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 



PAGE 61 



TITLE trouble* 



By CEORCE W. CUSHMAN 



■F you have any questions pertaining to titles or 
title-making, Mr. Cushman will be glad to answer them. 
Address him in care of Home Movies or his residence, 504 
Stanton Avenue, Ames, Iowa. In explaining your title 
troubles, include information such as type of equipment 
used, film, light source, and where possible, send along a 
sample of the title film. Enclose a self-addressed stamped 
envelope if you wish an early reply. 

Q. My 8mm. camera's fitted with a lens that focuses 
from 2 feet to infinity. Need I add an auxiliary lens in or- 
der to film titles 24 inches away? What is size of field at 
this distance?— C. E. W., Toledo, Ohio. 

A. No. Set lens at 2 feet and shoot. Auxiliary lenses are 
required for fixed focus lenses or with focusing lenses 
whenever title distance is less than focusing range of lens. 
Field covered at 2 feet by regular lens (a'/^rnm,) on your 
camera is 7 I /4" X 9^4"- 

O. Tell me how I can fake a moving title background 
by using a still picture for the background. — G. F. S., 
Athens, Ga. 

A. Place picture (which must be larger than usual title 
card) in title card holder and draw it slowly from one side 
to the other while photographing it. Then wind back film, 
replace photograph with title (lettered in white on black 
background), and superimpose title on background in a 
second exposure of the film. Background picture should 
be strictly scenic. 

Q. My Kodachromc titles show a distinct blucish cast in 
the white areas when exposed tinder photofloods. What 
causes this? — M. R., New Brunswick, N. f. 

A. As far as is known, it is due primarily to the pro- 
cessing. If objectionable, try shooting titles in sunlight with 
regular Kodachrome. 

Q. Told that fades could be made by moving a piece of 
Polaroid glass before the lens, I tried if. Result was no fade 
— only a reduction of glare and reflections. What is wrong? 
—D. /., Spokane, Wash. 

A. Two pieces of polaroid are required to produce the 
fading effect. They must be placed together in front of 
lens with both pieces in neutral position — that is, admitting 
maximum of light. Then, to fade out, rotate one of the 
polaroids 90 degrees. In this position, most of the light 
will be shut off from the lens marking end of the fade. 

Q. / develop all my positive film titles. However when 
they are projected they apfiear fogged on the screen. I al- 
ways use fresh film and develop in total darkness. What 
causes the fog? — W. W., South Bend, Ind. 

A. Condition is undoubtedly due not to fogging but to 
insufficient fixing of film in the hypo solution. After de- 
velopment, film should be fixed for twice the time it takes 
the milky appearance of film Co disappear in development. 
However, aging of hypo must be taken into consideration 
and as the solution becomes weaker, time of fixing must 
be lengthened proportionately. 



TITLES 



By EDMUND TURNER 



REEL 
SURPRISES 





PAGE 62 HOME MOVIES FOR FEBRUARY 

CLASSIFIED • iiimiTism, 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: Headquarters for hard-to-get equip- 
ment. 

USED 8MM. CAMERAS 
Keystone Model A-8 F:3.S lens, $23.50. 
Bell & Howell Sportster. Cooke F:2.5, combination 
case, $67.50. 

Revere Turret Model 99 with F:2.5 fixed focus and 

I'/l" Teletar Tele, with case. $82.50. 
Revere Turret Model 99 with 12.5mm. Wollensak 

1.9, focusing mount, $87.50. 

USED I6MM. CAMERAS 
Keystone Model A-3 with F:3.5 lens. $31.50. 
Keystone Model A-7, I" F:2.7 fixed focus lens. 

$39.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70A, Cooke F:3.5 lens and 
case, $47.50. 

Special DeVry, three speed, tubular parallax finder, 
hand crank and spring motor, with 15mm. Wol- 
lensak fixed focus F:2.7, I" Graf 1.5 and 3" 
Teletar F:4.5. in deluxe carrying case, $115.00. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 121 Magazine with Cooke 
F:l.8 lens. $77.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70E, four speed, I" Berthiot 
F:l.9 focusing mount and case, $125.00. 

Victor Model 3 Turret, 15mm. Wollensak fixed fo- 
cus F:2.7, I" Wollensak F:2.7, 2" Wollensak 
F:3.5 and case, $125.00. 

Bolex, new model, 15mm. Goerz Hypar F:2.7, I" 
Wollensak F:l.5 and 3" Wollensak F:4, all in 
focusing mounts, with case. $327.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70DA, single exposure re- 
lease, black finish, I" F:l.5 17mm. F:2.7 and 3" 

F:4 Wollensak lenses, case, $335.00. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70DA, brown finish, frame 
counter, hand crank and 1 10 volt motor, with 
17mm. F:2.7, I" F: 1 .5 Follensak lenses and 2" 
Acura F:2.8, $405.00. 

LENSES 

Hard to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focul lengths 
up to 6" including Cooke. Hugo Meyer, Dall- 
meyer and complete stock of new Wollensak 
lenses from wide angle to 6". Write for quo- 
tations. 

USED I6MM. PROJECTORS 
Bell & Howell Model 57. 250 w. lamp. 2" lens 

and case. $67.50. 
Keystone Model A-81. 750 watt lamp, F:l.6 lens 

and case, $67.50. 
Kodascope EE, 750 w. lamp, F:2.5 lens and case. 

$75.00. 

Victor Model II. 750 w. 400 ft. capacity, 2" F: 1 .85 

lens, case, $87.50. 
Complete Stock Craig Projecto-Editor equipment 

8mm. and 16mm. 
We buy 'em, sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 

stocks of new Cine Equipment, all makes. Send 

for Bass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment 

up to date. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY. Dept. HC. 179 W. 
Madison St., Chicago, Illinois. 



• MOVIE Library — 8mm., 16mm., 35mm., religious, 
educational, sports, comedies, travel. Request cat- 
alogs. Cameras, proiectors — buy, sell, exchange. 
Time payments. MOGULLS (Established 1914), 55 
West 48th. New York. 



• I6MM. SOUND Proiectors for sale. MULTIPRISES 
Box 1125, Waterbury, Conn. 



WANTED 



• WANTED— Used 25 Ft. double 8mm. camera 
spools. Let us know what you have. RITTER FILM 
SERVICE, 629 Lyman Ave., Oak Park, III. 



• BELL & HOWELL 16mm. sound projector wanted. 
Please state model, condition and price. MILLS 
NORMAL SCHOOL, Moose Jaw. Canada. 



• WANTED— Late model Cine Special, I" f/1.9 
lens, telephoto wide angle lens, case, extra mag- 
azine or other accessories. Answer full details. 
Cash. A. R. CARUCCI, 422 E. 4th St.. Wilmington, 
Del. Phone 4 7604. 



• 9'/ 2 rvlM. Movie Projector Pathe H. 200 B. Bolex 

G-3 or similar. Good price paid, delivery to U. S. 

or Canadian address. HARVEY. 1019 Salem Ave.. 
Dayfon, Ohio. 



• 35MM. Eymo camera for cash wanted. RICHARD 
NELSON, 1615 Ave. I, Apt. 317. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



• WANTED — Cine Special or Filmo 70-DA or com- 
plete outfit. Cash. Write JOHN FRASER. 748 Trin- 
ity Ave.. Bronx, N. Y. 



• Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 

Turn it into cash with a Home Movios 
classified ad! 

RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing data, 
10th of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6040 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



WANTED 



© 8MM. movie camera. Kodak or Bell & Howell, 
wanted for cash. Also want good projector. WM. 
ALDEN, 300 W. 93 St., N. Y. C. 



• I6MM. Sojnd Projector with or without P. A. 
system wanted for cash. ARTHUR RICH 845 West 
End Ave.. Apt. 5-F. N. Y. C. 



• ESO-S will trade merchandise for your old 50 ft. 

and 30 ft. 8mm. projection reels. Mail them to us 

today! We'll return credit memorandum and latest 
catalog! ESO-S. 3945 Central. K. C, Mo. 



• EASTMAN 2" f/1.6 and Dallmeyer 6" f/3.5 lenses. 
E. K. mount; also 100 ft. Cine Special magazine. 
RALPH BOICE. Warsaw, Indiana. 



• WANTED — used equipment. Bargain list on 
request. PETERS, 41. B So. 4th St.. AMentown. Penna. 



TITLINC 



• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit — Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16". IB", 20" 24", 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal for 
general close-up photography. Complete kit $3.00 
Separate lenses, 60c each. Also available in 6". 8" 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra-closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO., 3221 So. 
Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



o TITLING LETTERS that give you professional 
results. Pin letter and sanded back letters. Com- 
pete sets available $4.75 up. Write for descriptive 
literature. Ask about Santa Claus, Turkey and other 
title illustros. Big variety of large size and varied 
style letters can be purchased by the letter to fill 
all titling needs. MITTENS LETTER CO.. Redlands, 
Calif. 



FILMS FOR EXCHANGE 



• EXCHANGE: silent pictures, $1.00 reel; sound, 
$2.00. Also sell. Free catalogue. Selected sound 
programs, reasonable rentals. BETTER FILMS, 742 
New Lots Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



DUPLICATING SERVICE 

• $1.25 PAYS for a fifty-foot 8mm. duplicate of 
'our favorite reel. Our Monocolor duplicates will 
preserve those fading Kodachrome movies. Partic- 
Mars. ESO-S PICTURES. 3945 Central. Kansas City, 
Missouri. 



BINDERS 

for 

HOME MOVI ES 

with 

YOUR NAME ENGRAVED 
$1.50 

Each binder nolds 12 copies. Easy to insert or 
remove each magazine. Invaluable for those who 
save each copy for reference. We pay postage. 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 SUNSET BLVD. HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



FILM RELEASES 



o 8 AND I6MM. Film Subjects— black and white 
color — sound or silent. Largest selection ever com- 
piled. 65c to $200.00. Write for new, DeLuxe cata- 
log, profusely illustrated, 25c (coin or stamps) — 
refunded first purchase. HOLLYWOOD MOVIE 
SUPPLY CO., Box 870, Hollywood. Calif. 



• EXCHANGE your 16mm. full Subjects used o' 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm. -16mm. subjects 
cartoons, comedies. ABBE. 1265 Broadway. N. Y C. 



• MONEYMAKER! "The Worlr/s Greatest Passion 
Play." 16mm. and 35mm. Specify sound or silent 
Rent or purchase. Superior than Oberammergau 
play. HEMENWAY FILM CO.. 33-A Melrose St. 
Boston, Mass. 



o 8-I6MM. SILENT and sound films. Cameras and 
projectors. Bought, sold, traded. Free Lists. BOBS 
154 East 47th St.. N. Y. C. 



• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged, bought 
sold, rented. Bargains always. New Free lists 
FRANK LANE. 5 Little Bldg., Boston. Mass. 



o COMPLETE 16mm. sound Subjects, $1.00— need 
splicing. All sizes film bought, sold, exchanged. 
Catalogue, sample film 10c. I NTER NATION AL-H 
2120 Strauss, Brooklyn. N. Y. 



• 8MM.-I6MM. silent, sound films — all major pro- 
ducers. Rent films on yearly plan, three large 
rolls $1.25, postpaid. COLLIER PHOTO SALES. 
9508 Nelson, Telephone: Diamond 6836, Cleveland. 

Ohio. 



• SALE — Rental — Exchange: Latest film releases. All 
purchases guaranteed. Send stamp for free cata- 
logues. BAILEY FILMS. 1651 Cosmo. Hollywood. 
Calif. 



o LFADING religious 16mm. sound films. MULTI- 
PRISES Box 1125. Waterbury, Conn. 



• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New-used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins. REIDEL FILMS. 
Dept. HM-243. 3207 Joslyn Rd., Cleveland, Ohio. 



• YOUR name listed three months, also a list 
of members wanting to swap 8mm. films sent for 
25c. JOHN FOSSELMAN 457 North Smith, Saint 
Paul. Minnesota. 



• 8-I6MM. film subjects. $1.00 up. Lists, stamp. 
PENCE SERVICE, 2484 Liddesdale, Detroit. Mich. 



• g a PLAINS — 16mm. sound features and shorts. 
MULTIPRISES. Box 1125. Waterbury, Conn. 



KODACHROME FILM RELEASES 



o KODACHROME Travel Films— latest releases 
now available for distribution in 8 and 16mm. Dime 
will bring color sample and listings. KENWOOD 
FILMS. 818 E. 47th St., Chicago, III. 



o KODACHROME movies for grownups. Lists, sam- 
ple 10c or a projection length scene from WakiH 
hula, $1.00. Specify 8mm. or 16mm. JENKINS 392 
Elmira, N. Y. 



FILMS 



o HALF-a-dozen rolls of Univex single 8mm. film 
(New ESO-B) for $2.00. postpaid. Particulars or 
cash-with-order will bring film by return mail. Film 
ready for dalite loading in camera. ESO-S 3945 
Central. Kansas City. Mo. 



o HALF-a-dozen rolls of Univex single 8mm. film 
(New ESO-B) for $2.00. postpaid. Particulars or 
cash-with-order will bring film by return mail. Film 
ready for dalite loading in camera. ESO-S, 3945 
Central. Kansas City, Mo. 



PROCESSING SERVICE 



• MOTION picture processing. 100' 16mm., 75c 

50 16mm., 50c; 25' 8/8mm.. 35c; 25' 8mm., 25c 

RITTER FILM ' SERVICE, 629 Lyman Ave.. Oak 
Park III. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



o STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have 3 model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
printed in authentic legal manner, 50 for 25c (coin) 
postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATIONS. 6060 Sunset 
Blvd., Hollywood. Calif. 



JleAe ate Uelplul booJzA, that 

TELL YOU HOW! 



There's nothing like a handy, authentic book when you're 
stuck for the answer to an amateur movie problem. All 
of these books belong in every amateur's kit of movie 
making equipment. They not only supply answers to 



$1 



mm to tiue 
Home movif j 




Now in its second edition! Most popular book on the subject 
yet published. Gives all data and charts needed for every 
type of home movie titling; explains use of shims for ultra 
closeups; gives data on exposure with photofloods, title 
areas, field of view, auxiliary lenses, AND complete plans 
for building your own titler. Mailed prepaid for only $1.00. 




problems but offer incentive for expanding your hobby 
— pointing out the pleasure of titling movies, home pro- 
cessing, and gadget and accessory building. All books 
shipped postpaid. Order today! 




This is the book that takes up where your camera instruction 
book leaves off. Makes clear the functions and operation of 
all parts of your camera and lays the groundwork for good 
photography with your first roll of film. Points out mistakes 
to avoid which will save many times its price in film. It's a 
"must" for every beginner. Price 50e, postpaid. 




Processing home movie film is far more fascinating than de- 
veloping snapshots. It's extremely simple, too; and if you're 
a real amateur, eventually you'll want to process your movie 
films. Here's the book that tells you how; gives all formulas, 
plus plans for building your own processing equipment. It's 
a dependable advisor, and only 50c. 



With priorities curtailing equipment and accessories, you'll 
have to build the gadgets you need. But it's a lot of fun 
and here's just the book that pictures and describes many 
helpful gadgets for lenses, filters, tripods, for fades and lap- 
dissolves, ultra-closeup filming, titling, etc. — approximately 
100 pages of vital data and plans for only $1.00. 



HOME MOVIES 6060 SUNSET BLVD., HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



Forecasting better things 
to come with /Victory •« 




T HE NEW »6m 




EVEN while we, the entire Bell & Howell organization, are concen- 
trating all of our power today on war production — we know that 
some day the war clouds will lift, and are planning ahead for that time. 

Excellent evidence of these plans is the new Filmosound "V" Pro- 
jector. It is available now only to our armed forces — but it is a fore- 
cast of better things to come when Victory is won and new Bell & 
Howell products will be available to all. 

In spite of the fact that critical materials are restricted in the manu- 
facture of the Filmosound "V" Projector, it is a fine-quality, precision- 
built Bell & Howell projector in every sense. Incorporated are all 
features essential to superb sound and picture projection as well as 
film protection. It is sturdy, compact, and easy to operate. 



WANTED TO BU Y - FlLMOSOUNDS 

FOR UNCLE SAM Your Filmosound Projector is urgently 
needed by Uncle Sam for use in military training programs. If you 
will sell yours, wire us at once giving model, serial number, and your 
selling price including shipping charges to Chicago. 





Many rfeeed<iot*ed%\\\\ AVAILABLE 

SEE YOUR DEALER 



B&H DIRECT COLOR FILTERS 

VIEWER —all B&H Color 

for 1 6mm. film — Filters are still 

ready to attach to available except 

your model 136 Kodachrome 

splicer. The Type A. These 

viewer is an in- dyed optical glass 

valuable aid to filters have great 

editing because it stability and resistance to atmospheric 

makes it easy to conditions. They are attached to Filmo 

spot the frame cameras by screwing them into the lenses, 

you wish to cut. See your B&H dealer for selection. 



B&H FOCUSING ALIGNMENT 
GAUGE, for Filmo Turret 8 — 
permits use of Turret 8 Critical 
Focuser to the full extent of its capabilities. The 
gauge is mounted on your tripod and the Turret 8 
Camera attached to sliding block on the gauge. A title 
card, map, or any subject may then be sharply focused 
and accurately composed within the film frame area 
and photographed with complete assurance. 

Bell t Howell Company, Chicago; New York; Hollywood; Wash- 
ington, D. C; London. Ettabliiktd 1907. 




There's a Fighting Job for Every Projector . . . 

You and your projector, backed by the Filmosound Library, can 
render priceless educational and training assistance to hundreds of 
people, through OCD and similar group showings. The Filmosound 
Library offers almost unlimited selection of timely films, on a pur- 
chase or rental basis. If you do not know how to go about reaching 
the people who need to see and are eager to see these films, contact 
your B&H dealer and he will co-operate with you. 

New Films for the Civilian Front 

The U. S. Office of Education recently announced 15 new Industrial 
Training films, largely on benchwork skills, and has 140 more in 
the making. From Army and Navy schools come the first 37 teaching 
films, now released for civilian Pre-Induction and Pre-Flight Courses. 
OWl issues at least four new films each month — and OCD defense 
training films are now getting into use. The Filmosound Library 
augments all these official motion pictures with educational and 
recreational films . . . with training films on First Aid . . . and new 
releases on the new theaters of war, such as North Africa, Liberia* 
the Caucasus, etc. Send coupon for complete list. 



^^20-year-old airplane ex- 
~ pert. See "WOMEN IN 
DEFENSE" and other Owl 
films. 




B A N D A G - 
ING'' — sixth 
single-reel release 
in Emergency First 
Aid Series, just 
completed. 



A. President Barclay is fea- 
* tured in Prof. J. A. Fur- 
bay's new film, "LIBERIA.' 
a Filmosound Library "ex 
elusive." 



"E" FOR EXCELLENCE- how the Army-Navy Award for extraordinary 

performance is won and presented; one-reel sound film; service charge 50c. 




BUY WAR BONDS 



BELL & HOWELL COMPANY 
1825 Larchmont Ave. 
Chicago. III. 

Without obligation, please send me free: 

( ) List of available accessories. 

( ) Send me the "E" for EXCELLENCE sound 

reel for use on (date) 

( ) Details on new Filmosound Library films 

listed below. 



Name. . . 
Address. 
3lty 



.State. 




Price 25c 



YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $2.50 





"TAKE NY WORD FOR IT! 

Ask any of the thousands 
of fans showing Hollywood 
Home Movies why their 
programs are the best . . . ! " 

"Belly" Laughs! Thrilling Action! Drama! Anything and 
everything you desire to "round out" your programs, will 
be found in Hollywood Home Movies! Hundreds of enter- 
taining and educational subjects in 8mm. and 16mm. 
widths ... all designed to give your programs that added 
punch and audience-appeal. Screen them and then listen 
to your friends "rave"! 



HERE'S ONE REASON 



WALTER LANTZS 



THE THREE MONKEYS 




M E 



ANY 
M I N 
& 



M O E 



MICKEY MOUSE, 
MINNIE, 

DONALD DUCK 

And All the Rest! 



The "human" antics of 
Meany, Miny and Moe 
are bound to delight your 
audience. With 49 sub- 
jects available in 16mm. 
and 39 in 8mm., their ca- 
pers will add that "extra 
something" to your pro- 
grams. 



The new series has swept 
the country by storm! For 
the first time in the his- 
tory of MICKEY MOUSE 
and DONALD DUCK 
HOME MOVIES, you can 
now screen these lovable 
Disney characters in 200- 
foot 14mm. and 100-foot 
8mm. complete subjects. 
Every film tells a com- 
plete story! 




Send for Free Catalogue! 



50-foot 8mm. 
100-foot 16mm. 



$1.50 
3.00 



HERE'S ANOTHER! 



A New Home Movies Star 

BOSKO 




50-foot 8mm. 
100-foot 16mm. 



Bosko is one of the 
most delightful charac- 
ters ever to emerge from 
the cartoon field of en- 
tertainment. With his 
pal dog Bruno, he is 
typical of the little 
waif who constantly 
gets into trouble. You'll 
love Bosko in all of his 
latest releases. 



$1.50 
3.00 



WALTER LANTZ S 



OSWALD RABBITT 



Your 'Program' Needs Him! 
Oswald, the funny little rab- 
bit, who is ever popular with 
young and old alike. His ad- 
ventures are screened in 57 
16mm. subjects and 43 
8mm films — every foot 
packed with laughs. 



50-foot 8mm. 
100-foot 16mm. 




$1.50 
3.00 



ASK YOUR DEALER FOR DEMONSTRATION SCREENING TODAY! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 



6060 SUNSET BOULEVARD 



HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 




\DVISORY EDITORS 

IR. A. K. BAUMGARDNER 

Peoria Cinema Club 

ETER BEZEK 

Chicago Cinema Club 

. JAMES B1ALSON 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Louis 

. MOSS BROWN 

Dallas Cinema Club 

WALTER BRACKEN 

The 8-16 Movie Club, Philadelphia, Pa. 

I. EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographers 

USSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema Club 

YRIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Club 

RTHUR E. GIBBS 

Portland Cine Club 

AY A. HOOK 

Seattle 8mm Club 

LFRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Club 

E. NESTELL 

Cinemen Club 

ARCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

ILBERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 

, THEO. ROTH 

Sherman Clay Movie Club 

. O. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm Movie Club 

PAUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

[ED E. SNYDER 

Des Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 

[ F. SISSEL 

Austin Movie Club 

MJRTIS O. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 



. />ome . 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



:red as Second-Class Matter, May 6, 1938, at 
Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 

Act of March 3, 1879. 
sciption rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
ies 25c. Adverising rates on application. 



Copyright 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen 
Publications, Hollywood, Calif. No part of magazine 
may be reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR MARCH, 1943 

THE READER SPEAKS 68 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS By J. H. Schoett JO 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW... JZ 

MOVIE OF THE MONTH By f. H. ScljOCtl 7 J 

WAR-TIME MOVIE SHOWS KEEP PROJECTORS BUSY 

— By Warren Garin j6 

A FILMLESS PRACTICE PROJECT 77 

SINGLE-FRAME RELEASE FOR THE MODEL "k" 

— By Arthur M. Sharp 78 
shooting the Colorado rapids — By Frederick Foster 79 

A CUSTOM-BUILT CAMERA AND RECORDER By CurttS Randall 80 

positive vs. reversal titles — By George W. Cushmttn 8 I 

MULTIPLE EXPOSURES AND HOW TO MAKE THEM 

— By W. D. Garlock 82 

AN AMATEUR-BUILT "FULL-FRAME" SPLICER FOR 8MM. FILMS 

— By Al Morton 83 

THE EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP 84 



MARCH 



CHAS. J. Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. J. Ver HALEN, JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

6000 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OPFICE 
Everett Gellert, 62 West 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 




NUMBER 3 
VOLUME X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. GAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORGE W. CUSHMAN 
j. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S MAGAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 



PACE 68 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 




J J 



Qoe/ty American 

PRECISION 

OPTICS 



rr 



unce 



1899 



BECAUSE OF THEIR 
ACCURACY THEY ARE 
DEPENDED UPON BY 
OUR ARMED FORCES 
ON LAND — ON THE SEA 
— IN THE AIR— 



"GOERZ - AMERICAN 
PHOTO-LENSES 

play an important part in the 
war program and our produc- 
tion is now keyed to fill the 
requirements of our Govern- 
ment. Within limitations we 
may still be able to supply 
Goerz lenses, of certain types 
and sizes, for civilian use. We 
suggest your inquiries through 
your dealer or direct. 



Address 
DEPT. HM-) 

CP. GOERZ AMERICAN OPTICAL CO. 



The Reader 




Loads Film Magazines 

Sirs: In your August 1942 issue, 
Ralph King requested information con- 
cerning reloading of 8mm. film maga- 
zines with positive film for titling. I 
have been doing this for sometime with 
success. First step is to obtain one of the 
empty magazines — difficult to do unless 
one removes the film from a magazine 
himself after exposing same. It then be- 
comes necessary to respool the film and 
send same to an independent laboratory 
for processing. 

Having thus acquired an empty mag- 
azine, next step is to acquaint yourself 
with its "innards." Accompanying 
sketch indicate the vital parts that af- 




Office and Factory 
317 East 34th Street 



New York 



• Diagram of 8mm. film magaxine. 

feet re-loading operations. Film, in 
starting position, is wound on core B 
and unwinds passing around peg D, be- 
tween pressure plate F and gate; thence 
above peg C and onto core A. A thin 
brass strip extends between pegs C and 
D. Pressure plate F can be pulled back 
against coiled spring by pin E. This pin 
is attached to pressure plate F and ex- 
tends through small keyhole in brass 
clip that runs from C to D. 

Cores A and B are identical but core 
B must be placed with small nib up and 
core A with nib down. G givots at H 
and taeps the two coils of film separ- 
ated as the film travels from one core to 
another. Before winding film on core B 
(and it must be wound emulsion side 
out) cut out rib between two of the 



SPEAKS 



perforations at a distance of about 
eight inches from end of film, so this 
cut will be on bottom side of the film. 
Repeat this operation eight inches from 
other end of film. By severing these 
ribs, the sprocket holes at these points 
are enlarged, prevent intermittent claw 
from moving the film beyond this point, 
and automatically stop the film from 
traveling further and becoming de- 
tached from the core. 

There are two important things to 
remember: (1) Do not attempt to wind 
more than 25 feet of film on core B; 
(2) Bulk positive film is packed in rolls 
with the emulsion side in or facing the 
core. It is necessary to reverse the film 
when loading it in the magazine, but in 
order to insure its working effectively, 
it becomes necessary to "condition" it 
by first cutting it into 25 foot lengths 
and winding on regular camera or 
projection spools emulsion side oid, 
leaving it so wound for a period 
of at least 60 days. After this period 
the film will assume reverse coiling and 
may be loaded in the magazine. 

Not to do this would mean the film 
would uncoil from core B and clog the 
magazine. It would be well to practice 
loading magazine with old film under a 
ruby safelight, before attempting to load 
with good, unexposed film. — D. W. 
Lineberry, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Will Shoot Footage 

Sirs: Very pleased with my subscrip- 
tion to Home Movies. I'm Staff Ser- 
geant in U. S. Army, live near Wash- 
ington, D. C. Will be glad to hear from 
other amateurs who would like pictures 
of Washington or Army life. Am start- 
ing to work on a picture on Army life 
which I hope to enter in your next con- 
test. Reel Fellows' correspondence es- 
pecially mvited. — S. Sgt. John E. Flick, 
3202 Taylor St., Mt. Rainier, Md. 

Happy Swapper 

Sirs: Thanks to notice printed in your 
Swappers' column, I got in touch with 
Leo Caloia, producer of "Latitude 26" 
who swapped 100 feet of Kodachrome 
scenes of Los Angeles for 100 feet of 
scenes of Times Square and New York 
Gty. — Henry Fisher, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PAGE 69 



NOW YOU CAN OWN 




SYMBOL OF OUR ARMY" 
A Stirring New Film 



See on your own screen the thrilling and timely action story oi 
the great military college and what it means in peace and warl 



Hi 



Lere is West Point as seen from the inside . . . made 
under the supervision of West Point authorities! Stal- 
wart young Americans engaged in the serious business 
of training to lead men and win victories! See the 
course of instruction that has turned out such brilliant 
generals as Grant and Lee, Sherman, Pershing, and 
MacArthur! See West Pointers toughening up with 
sports . . . painstakingly learning lessons in the class- 
room . . . putting those lessons to actual tests in mimic 

battles! See them cross rivers in assault boats build 

bridges amidst explosions ... fly fighting planes against 
realistic gunfire! Here is the picture that tells you why 
the U. S. Army is ready for the tremendous struggle in 
which it is engaged. Own this movie! Thrill yourself, 
your family, your friends! 






SEE YOUR PHOTO DEALER 
OR SEND THIS HANDY 
ORDER FORM TO HIM 
TODAY! 

ORDER FORM ■ 



Please send the thrilling movie, "West Point, Symbol of 
Our Army," in the size and edition indicated. 



Name- 



Address- 



City- 



State. 



HM-S 



8 mm. 


□ 50 feet . . . 


$1.75 


□ 180 feet. . . 


5.50 


16 mm. 


□ 100 feet . . 


2.75 


□ 360 feet . . 


8.75 


□ Sound 350 feet 


17.50 



RemlMinci ••cloud □ 



Still t.O.D. □ 



Send Castle Films' FREE War Film Catalog □ 

Copr. 1943. Castle Films. Inc. 



PACE 70 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



FRESNEL 

PHOTOSPOT 




THE MAN'S SIZE 
ALL PURPOSE SPOTLIGHT 
OF PROFESSIONAL POWER 

AND FLEXIBILITY 

72 Outstanding Features: 

• 4" Fresnel Lens 

• Focuses from I' spot to 6' flood at 5' 

• Focuses to give soft or sharp shadows 

• Hinged front opens for wide floodings 

• Welded steel body, completely venti- 
lated 

• Yoke fits table base, tripod, light stand 

• 10/ approved asbestos cord and switch 

• Burns 300, 500, 750 w. & Kodachrome lamp 

• Swivels in any direction on tension pivots 

• Cool Bakelite focusing and tilting handles 

• 500 waft, 50 hour life projection lamp, 
$2.20 

• Adjustable stand extends to 4' 10", $2.95 

• Valuable, expensive accessories include 
framing mask, diffuser, color filter kit 



$ 14 95 



Mail Orders Filled 




32d St. Near 6th Ave., N.Y.C. 





FROM KODACHROMES BY 

FAMOUS 
AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 



504 



EACH 



Series of thrilling Kodachromes showing U.S. 
Fighters and Bombers in actual fight. Among 
them, Flying Fortress, P-38, Consolidated Fly- 
ing Boat, Hudson Bomber, B-25 and others. 
Order from your favorite camera store — also 
u rite for complete list to 

WESTERN MOVIE SUPPLY CO. 

254 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



REVIEWS... 



of cAmateur film* 



B y 



S C H 0 E N 



SoME movie makers are more pro- 
lific filmers than others, yet the most 
prolific do not always turn out the best 
pictures. There are amateurs who have 
been shooting for years, yet demon- 
strate little or no knowledge of contin- 
uity or sequence. It was therefore, a 
pleasure for the editors when Wm. R. 
Thornberry, of North Hollywood, 
Calif., submitted for analysis and re- 
view three films completed by him dur- 
ing the past year. 

A review of-each film is presented here 
because each dem- 
onstrates a peculiar 
aptitude for present- 
ing in story form, in- 
cidents ordinarily 
filmed by others in 
straight document- 
ary fashion. Other 
filmers, whose imag- 
inations fail to be 
sparked by the con- 
tinuity possibilities in 
such commonplace 
incidents as spending 
a day at home, the 
birth of a baby, etc., 
will find a lesson in 
these filming accom- 
plishments of Wm. 
R. Thornberry. None 
of the films are pre- 
tentious. They run the ordinary 50 to 
100 foot length of the average 8mm. 
filmer's effort. 

^The Book Agent" stars Thornberry, 
his wife and their baby. Story concerns 
a young lady book agent who, in the 
course of her door-to-door selling cam- 
paign, encounters a prospect lazing in a 
sunchair on his veranda. He shows no 
interest in her or her books until she 
tells him there's a premium of one kiss 
goes with each book purchased. The 
young man buys several books, and the 
premium giving ripens into friendship, 
then love. A title, "One Hour Later . . ." 
precedes a closeup showing a wad of bills 
in the girl's hand — the receipts from her 
overwhelming book sales to the young 
man. Another title — "8760 hours (or 
one year) later ..." follows this shot 
and the next scene shows a happy little 
family group — the book agent, the man 



(now her husband) and a baby boy — 
reminiscing by the family fireside. 

Thornberry, who wanted to make 
movies of his family, might have fol- 
lowed the hackneyed formula of film- 
ing his wife and child at random in un- 
related shots. He wisely spent a little 
time in developing a light story, with 
himself and family as principals, and 
filmed it — and had a whale of a lot more 
fun. 

"The Book Agent" runs 50 feet in 
5mm. Kodachrome and was awarded a 
3 -Star merit leader. 



• EVERY filmer of amateur moi - 
ies, whether a subscriber or not, is 
iniited to submit his films to the 
editors for review and helpful criti- 
cism. This free service applies to any 
type of picture uhether it be your 
first motie or a pretentious photo- 
play effort. Aim of this seriice is 
to help you make better pictures. 

Reiieued films will be rated i, i 
and 3 stars. Those rating i or 3 
stars uill receite Free an animated 
leader indicative of its merit. Best 
film reviewed each month uill re- 
ceive a special certificate auard as 
the Movie of the Month. 

All films are returned promptly 
by insured express together with 
merit leaders and special analysis 
report. 



^*Life Begins" is 
the Thornberry's 



movie record of their 
first "blessed event." 
Opening of the story 
follows the familiar 
formula of the ner- 
vous husband silent- 
ly suffering in the 
hospital waiting 
room while his wife 
bears him a child in 
the adjoining mater- 
nity ward. Finally 
there's a closeup of a 
box of cigars with a 
sign tacked on the 
cover announcing 
it's a boy. A short se- 
quence follows this showing all the gifts 
received in a baby shower, then a title, 
as spoken by the new arrival: "Well, 
here I am — three weeks old today!" 
This title dissolves into a closeup of the 
baby, and from this point on, action in 
the picture is described by the baby in 
spoken titles — very effective. 

The title, "My Dad makes the for- 
mula — boy! is it good!" introduces a se- 
quence showing Dad preparing the 
baby's food, feeding him, etc., while 
outside, mother hangs diapers. Con- 
cluding sequences show the father bath- 
ing the child, and neighbors and rela- 
tives calling to visit it. 

The continuity, in spite of its fa- 
miliar theme, is treated with fresh new 
angles and the smart titling, superim- 
posed over the scenes, is a highlight that 
contributes much to the picture which 
also received a 3 -Star merit leader. 

• Continued on Page <>J 







• to ^Vp ° tberS 
by tVve de»re to ^ 

ComP-v. >» * The N ^ , or . r ;„ ^ ^ 



.cK HOME 

-acred 1,1 



interested 
rneot- 





star attract^" '° olh ers. £ 1 ir e ^'^^ 
need. 



*^ sUpP UeS 



, -,otam s " e ...V, needed V wardens- n ^ otv - iect° r 

possible- 



CIVILIAN P«'«^-JSS^ 

C ,Y ' . we \come the c " ures ot e ngers, 
f ^ooportun^s **** 



yea tS „ins^ is0 
{or tte com»°8 



Revere owners arc invited to 
write us of other interesting 
ways in which they are sharing 
their equipment with others. 




HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



J/ you want a FILM to dhow . . . 

. . . here's news of timely subjects for home projectors 



PAGE 72 



BUY WAR BONDS 




New Features for Your Filmo 

• If you want features offered by newest 
Filmo models which your dealer can't de- 
liver immediately, chances are that B&H 
craftsmen can add them to your present 
Filmo Camera or Projector. New "Mod- 
ernization Folders" give details and costs. 
Ask your dealer or write, staling your Filmo 
model. 

Use This Timely NEW SERVICE 

• If you own a Bell & Howell Camera or 
Projector, you have something that might 
be difficult to replace now. So you'll want 
to take especially good care of it. Do this 
with assurance and economy by using our 
new Standard-Price Service Plan. See your 
dealer or write for prices on the three 
classes of our new, economical, mainte- 
nance and repair service. Bell& Howell 
Company, 1825 Larchmont Ave., Chicago; 
New York; Hollywood; Washington, D. C; 
London. Established 1907. 



PRECISION-MADE BY 





West Point — Symbol of the Air is 
Castle Films release for March. Picture 
takes spectator into class rooms and lab- 
oratories of ^* r est Point and stirring 
scenes show cadets in drill and athletic 
activities. Cadets are shown crossing 
rivers in assault boats, building bridge 
under fire; flying planes against gunfire 
and practicing earnestly all the fighting 
tactics necessary to modern war. 

"W est Point — Symbol of Our Army" 
available at photographic dealers in 
the following sizes and lengths: i 6mm. 
ico ft. headline, S2.75; 16mm. 360 ft. 
complete S8.75; 16mm. 350 ft. sound 
S17.50; 8mm. 50 ft. headline Si. 75; 
£mm. 180 ft. complete, S5.50. Catalogs 
and other data are available by writing 
Castle Films, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York Citv. 




The Real Caribbean is a new 16mm. 
sound release by Bell & Howell's Filmo- 
sound Library, which reveals the import- 
ance of this area in the defense of both 
North and South America. Revealed are 
the resources, life of the native popula- 
tion, social differences based up on eco- 
nomic rather than color lines and the 
reflection of European colonization. 

Photography is good and the sound 
track up-to-date. Available in one-reel, 
color or black and white, sound or si- 
lent, price for color is S60.00; S36.00 
for black and white. Rental is at the 
rate of S3. 00 for color and S1.50 for 
black and white prints. 



Further data available from Bell & 
Howell, 1 80 1 Larchmont, Chicago. 

Better Films, -42 New Lots Ave.. 
Brooklyn, X. Y., will, effective March 
1 st, include without charge with all 
rental 16mm. sound programs, the two 
most timely pictures of the year — "Tar- 
get For Ton ght" (5 reels )and "Listen 
To Britain (2 reels). For th; 1943 
seascn, this concern reports they have 
set aside more than one hundred excel- 
lent features and are offering them at 
reasonable rental rates. For further par- 
ticulars cn rentals, write th:m for their 
free Victory B Bulletin. 




Friends of the Air is a one-reel docu- 
mentary on bird life available in either 
color or sound from Bell & Howell, 
1801 Larchmont, Chicago. A film of 
more than usual interest to educational 
institutions and lecturers on nature sub- 
jects, it is superbly photographed and 
complimented by an interesting sound 
narrative. Studies include the robin, 
wren, bluebird, brown thrasher, cardi- 
nal, jay, nuthatch, catbird and others. 
Prints may be purchased at S60.00 for 
sound or S3 6.00 for black and white, 
or they may be rented at rates of S3. 00 
and S1.50 respectively. 




Six-Shooter Mickey is one of the most 
popular of the new series Mickey Mouse 
animated cartoons released by Holly- 
wood Film Enterprises, 6060 Sunset 
Blvd.. Hollywood. Mickey is the dash- 

• Continued on Page o; 




New "Professional Jr." Tripod 

Worthwhile 14mm. filming, whether silent or 
sound, requires a sturdy yet versatile tripod 
built along professional lines. The new 

PROFESSIONAL JR." is built to precision 
standards, weighs but 14 lbs. Friction type 
Head gives super-smooth pan and tilt action. 

Spread-leg'' design assures utmost rigidity 
and quick, positive height adjustment. Camera 
platform takes EK Cine Special, B&H Filmo, 
Bolei or Berndt-Maurer Cameras: also adapt- 
able for 35mm. Eyemo, DeVry, etc. Used by 
the U. S. Gov't, leading 16mm. producers and 
newsreel companies. 

Send (or literature describing 14 features thoroughly. 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT CO. 

1600 Broadway New York. N. Y. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PACE 73 



MOVIES ARE EAGERLY AWAITED 




at our far distant outposts 



The roar of a huge U. S. Patrol bomber 
ploughing to a stop in the harbor is 
always welcome music to American 
fighters at faraway bases. Among 
other things, it means mail from home 
and a fresh supply of the latest motion 
picture releases! 

Every inch of space in our vast fleet 
of cargo planes is precious — is urgently 
needed for transporting vital medical 
supplies and important w ar materials. 
Still our government considers motion 
pictures so valuable to the mainte- 
nance of high morale in the U. S. 
armed forces that the latest films, in 
16mm. versions, are classed as a 
"must" for our wartime skyway 
freight lines. 

Thousands of Ampro projectors are 
being utilized in a vast 16mm. motion 



picture program for training and en- 
tertaining United Nation soldiers on 
both fighting and production fronts. 
Still more projectors are needed! Pri- 
vate owners of 16mm. projectors are 
urged to contact Civilian Defense au- 
thorities in their local communities 
and enlist their machines in this vital 
wartime program. 

100% of Ampro facilities are en- 
gaged in the production of projectors 
and precision war equipment for the 
United Nations. Ampro engineering 
research continues undiminished — as- 
suring civilian users more efficient 
projectors than ever when the war is 
over. In the meantime you can plan for 
the future by keeping up with the new- 
est developments in 16mm. projectors. 
\^ rite today for latest Ampro Catalog! 



The above dual unit Ampro- 
sounds a re typical of those used 
in "special services" overseas 



The Ampro Corporation, 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 

AMPR0* 



74 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 





"POETRY OF MOTION," by George R. Nelscn of Whitestone, New 
York. The classic detail of this beautiful swan photograph has made it a 
top-prize winner. Notice the excellent detail in the feathers, the graceful 
swirls of water, the brilliancy and tone gradation. 

This outstanding picture was enlarged with a Wollensak 2"/3.5 Velostigmat. George Nelson 
says, "For the past five years I have used two Wollensak enlarging lenses in my work. 
I have found that they reproduce perfectly all the fine detail on the negative. I recommend 
them unreservedly." Improve your photography with a Wollensak. 



For Movies, Candid, Enlarging, Action, Stills 



OLLEN/AK OPTICAL CO.. ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



HOME MOVIES 

Published in Hollywood 
MARCH 1943 





One 



of the 



3n Y int e 



r est; t 



"9 an;, 



C ' 0Se «P S ?n ... 

Jun 9'e ft,„_, . 



V 



IT is a coincidence that follow- 
ing Fredrick Foster's fine article on zoo 
filming in the February issue, that the 
Movie of the Month for March should 
be a zoo picture. 

"Jungle Parade" is no epic but it em- 
phasizes in picture treatment all that 
was touched upon by Foster in his ar- 
ticle on movie zoography, and proves 
that it really is possible to turn out more 
than ordinary zoo pictures when pos- 
sessing an instinctive flair for con- 
tinuity. 

"Jungle Parade" is a production in 
8mm. Kodachrome by Fred Evans of 
Los Angeles. The picture runs 175 feet. 
Locale for the splendid animal scenes is 
the famed San Diego Zoo and title for 
the picture was suggested in the inter- 
esting book written by Belle J. Bench- 
ley, the Zoo's noted curator. 

Evans' picture is not just a series of 
movie snapshots of animals strung to- 
gether hit or miss fashion. There's a logi- 
cal beginning and end with a light story 
thread woven among the carefully 
filmed animal scenes. 

The picture begins with professional- 
like introduction in well executed titles 
which will be described later. Ooenin^ 
scene shows a family — husband, wife 
and a small boy — seated in the living 
room. The husband is reading a book 
and a closeup shows it to be Belle Bench- 
ley's book, "My Life In A Man-Made 
Jungle." The wife suggests they take 
their little boy to see the "man-made 
jungle." The husband agrees and th ; s 
sequence dissolves into the next, show- 
ing the family car starting the journey. 

The trio reach the zoo, enter the 



• Frame enlargements from Fred Evans' 
Movie of the Month, a record of a trip 
to the 100 in which a light continuity is 
blended with rare shots of animals and 
birds. 



MOVIE oitke MONTH 



gate, and from this point we see the va- 
rious animals from the visitors' view- 
point. Not infrequently Evans has cut 
in, between the animal shots, brief close- 
ups of the trio's feet walking to or 
away from the camera — a cinematic ef- 
fect that overcomes any possibility of 
monotony in the subject and reminds 
the spectator that the little family are 
present seeing these same animals. Full 
shots of the family group are never al- 
lowed to intrude in the animal sequences 
except in the subtle manner already 
mentioned, and in one scene where the 



75 




little boy was pictured seated on a huge 
tortoise. Notable, too, is the skill by 
which Evans avoided the bars and net- 
ting of cages in all animal shots. 

A highlight is the climaxing sequence 
portraying a demonstration of trained 
seals, which is a daily feature for visi- 
tors of the zoo. Here spectators are 
shown for the first time. Of interest is the 
manner in which Evans filmed this se- 
quence — not from one camera angle, 
but from various angles and with lenses 
of varying focal lengths so that the 
O Continued on Page 87 






HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



• Many cine clubs maintain committees who 
regularly stage movie shows for invalid chil- 
dren and the, aged. Success of these shows has 
led to broadening activity to include exhibi- 
tion of non-theatrical films for war benefits, 
civilian defense rallies and Defense Stamp 
sales campaigns. 




• "Russia Strikes Back" typifies the quality of 
up-to-date news subject released monthly by 
Castle Films. Films of this kind are popular 
with audiences everywhere. 




WAR TIME MOM SHOWS 
KEEP PROJECTORS BUSY 



w 



• "The Housekeeper's Daughter" is but one 
of the several Hal Roach films now available 
in 16mm. sound for non-theatrical exhibition 
by Post Pictures Corp. 



JNTIL we entered the war, so 
much emphasis was placed on making 
movies that few amateurs showed any 
inclination to explore the vast entertain- 
ment possibilities their projectors af- 
forded beyond the occasional showing 
of their own home movies. 

Today, this picture is changing. Mov- 
i3 amateurs, frustrated by mounting 
war-tme restrictions in the filming of 
pictures, are turning attention to ex- 
hibiting movies. What they are just 
beginning to appreciate is that there 
now is a wealth of professionally pro- 
duced 8mm. and 1 6mm. films which 
may be rented or purchased outright, the 
showing of which can afford as much 
pleasure as making movies. 

Others, quick to discover the money- 
making possibilities in sub-standard film 
exhibition, are devoting all possible 
spare time to screening complete film 
programs to large audiences for the 
purpose of raising money for various re- 
lief agencies, war benefits, or to fur- 



ther Defense Stamp sales. Several cine 
clubs are regularly sponsoring War 
Stamp Movie Shows that require pur- 
chase of one or more Defense Stamps for 
admission. In the non-profit field, the 
showing of films to shut-ins is gaining 
wider and deserved attention. Civilian 
Defense Corps, needing a stimulant 
for recruiting and training campaigns, 
have found many movie amateurs will- 
ing to lend a hand with their projectors 
in the screening of OCD training and 
publicitly films. 

Makes no difference which projector 
is available — eight or sixteen — both are 
capable of furnishing acceptable screen 
entertainment for larger than living- 
room-size audiences. Where sound films 
are to be exhibited, of course, a sound 
projector must be used. And fortu- 
nately, a surprising number of sound 
projectors are available from many 
sources such as public schools and 
churches who willing place them in 
• Continued on Page oo 




• Left Animated cartoons are 

popular with all audiences. This 
scene is from "Toy-town Tale" re- 
leased by Certified Film Distrs. 
Other animated cartoons are re- 
leased in 8mm. and 14mm. by Hol- 
lywood Film Enterprises and Castle 
Films. Right — Duties of Air Raid 
Wardens and other Civilian Defense 
volunteers are clearly demonstrated 
in the many OCD films available to 
amateur film exhibitors. Some of 
these are loaned free, others in- 
volve small handling charge. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PACE 77 



JtOmU* PRACTICE PROJECT . . . 




EXPOSURE MUST BC INCREASED WHEH 
SHOOT/N* IN rfHtlY OH l4Tf »ou*s OF BUY. 



Up your shooting average 
by learning to judge 
exposures instantly... 

SKILL, physical or 
mental, is devel- 
oped only by repeti- 
tive and sustained 
effort. Now, with 
less film to shoot for 
the duration, movie 
amateurs can utilize 
spare hours practic- 
ing and perfecting 
such movie tech- 
niques as judging exposure, framing scenes, shooting for 
correct footage, etc., in filmless practice projects that will 
greatly improve future movie making. A daffy idea? Not 
at all. Some of the foremost photographers attained early 
skill by taking their unloaded cameras afield and practicing 
focusing, composition, etc. 

Take exposure, for instance. How many amateurs get 
"on-the-nose" exposure nine times out of ten? This skill 
can be perfected by simply training the eye to recognize 
lighting conditions and evaluating them in terms of 
exposure. 

Take your empty camera out of doors. Focus it upon 
various scenes, setting exposure you judge to be correct. 
Then check these exposure settings against your meter 
readings and compare difference, if any. Object of this 
practice is to train the movie amateur to determine ex- 
posure by experience and instinct rather than to depend 
upon exposure meter readings for every shot. This is the 
professional's tech- 
nique that enables \_/ 
newsreel men and 
spot news photog- 
raphers to snap an 
opportune shot in- 
stantly without fum- 
bling with a meter. 

First thing to rec- 
ognize is that day- 
light is fairly con- 
stant during that pe- 
riod between two 
hours after sunrise 
and two hours be- 
fore sunset. During 

the normal light period that intervenes, it is possible to 
shoot all average scenes in bright sunlight at the same lens 
opening, say f/n, if pan film is used. Speed of film emul- 
sion used must always be taken into consideration. For 
closeups and scenes in light shade, open up one top. Where 
skies are overcast or for shots made in deep shade, opening 
up two stops will net proper exposure. 

Now under normal conditions, the cinetographer will 
take a reading with his exposure meter, if he has one, which 




NOfiMPl SCENES, BfflOHT SUNU OUT I P//t . 




is as it should be. However, there are instances when shoot- 
ing such topics as children or babies and many sports events, 
that a rare shot suddenly presents itself. To get it means 
calculating exposure, setting lens diaphragm and shooting 
instantly. To read the meter, then adjust lens for exposure 
— quickly as this sometimes can be done — often incurs just 
enough delay to cause shot to be missed. 

Training oneself to instantly recognize exposure as sug- 
gested here will enable the amateur to get into immediate 
action and record the scene simply because he will be able 
to instinctively recognize light conditions in terms of ex- 
posure and instantly set his camera lens correctly to record 
it. The cameraman, filming action scenes, who must take 
a meter reading each time he changes camera set-up in- 
variably misses much that the trained photographer would 
otherwise get. 

To continue these practice exercises with your camera, 

take a walk down 
the street, through 
the park or out into 
the country. When- 
ever you see an in- 
teresting object or 
scene, sight your 
camera upon it and 
set exposure accord- 
ing to your judg- 
ment. Then take a 
meter reading of the 
same scene as seen 
through your viewfinder and see how close you come to 
calculating correct exposure. 

With a little practice any amateur will find it possible 
to accurately judge exposure for other than average scenes, 
too, such as those in which considerable dark areas prevail 
— trees, shrubbery, etc. It will be possible to calculate the 
right exposure for scenes containing a great deal of sky 
area — a type of scene that gives the average beginning 
amateur the most trouble because the abundance of sky 
invariably results in over-reading the meter. 

The training suggested here is not intended to abolsh use 
of your exposure meter. On the contrary, it is intended to 
augment its use and thus develop a greater skill in using it 
as needed. To depend 
upon an exposure 
meter entirely will 
never produce a good 
photographer, for us- 
ing a meter must be 
tempered with a 
measure of instinc- 
tive judgment in or- 
der to develop the 
sort of skill that has 
enabled professionals 

to attain their high evt/tCASr SKtes 0fl bf>RH SH/toe . 
degree of proficiency. opc* up two stops . 



CiOSe UPS OP 1 1 OUT SHftDE 
OPEN UP out STOP- 





HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



• Fig. I — Hand operated single-frame 
release before assembly. Fig. 2 — 
Patchet-operated single-frame release 
ready for assembly. Fig. 3 — Hand-op- 
erated release mounted and ready for 
use. Fig. 4 — Ratchet-operated release 
assembled on camera showing con- 
necting lead from solenoid control 
(not in picture). 



Si 



le-3rame S\elea£e 
(or the Model "K 



B 



H U 



j^S a movie amateur becomes more 
and more interested in his hobby, his 
desire for a better camera becomes more 
intense. There is invariably encountered 
a certain shot or trick effect which his 
camera is not equipped to make. 

I am such a cinebug. I wanted to 
make time-lapse movies and animated 
cartoons. I wanted to make movies of 
wild life, of birds building nests, etc., 
but all this, which required a single- 
frame release, remote control, and other 
devices, was beyond the scope of my 
camera until I got busy and spent sev- 
eral highly enjoyable evenings making 
the alterations and camera gadgets I 
needed. 

The evenings thus spent were highly 
profitable as well as instructive, for my 
Cine Kodak now sports a wind-back; a 
single-frame release with both electric 
and hand control; and a frame counter 
which registers every single frame of 
the roll of film! This last feature enables 
me to select any particular frame at 
random — from one to four thousand. 
It's a dream of a gadget for executing 
superimposed titles. 

The most interesting gadget, perhaps, 
in view of the widespread interest in 
time-lapse cinetography, is the single- 
frame release and remote control I built 



• Fig. 5 — Diagrams of various parts 
required to assemble both hand-oper- 
ated and ratchet operated single- 
frame releases for model K Cine 
Kodak. 



M 



for my camera and described briefly in 
my account of time-lapse photography 
in the October, 1942 Home Movies. 

This single-frame release was designed 
so it could be operated by hand or by 
mechanical means and the essential parts 
of this gadget can be mounted on the 
camera with aid of a screw driver in 
a few minutes or removed just as quick- 



ly. The only alteration necessary to the 
camera is to drill and tap a small hole 
in the case near the starting lever for a 
machine screw. 

The device is simplicity itself and can 
best be understood by studying the ac- 
companying photos and diagrams. In 
principle, a six-tooth sprocket gear ro- 
tates as it is turned by hand and, as it 
turns, a tooth in the gear strikes a pin 
on the camera starting lever, depress- 
ing it momentarily to set the camera in 
motion for a single frame exposure. 
Moving the gear again until another 
tooth strikes the starting lever, a second 
frame is exposed, and so on. With little 
or no skill, it is possible to obtain uni- 
form single-frame exposures even with 
the camera spring wound tight. 

A different sprocket gear is used for 
the mechanical control. Instead of the 
knurled grip on the knob, a collar con- 
taining a ratchet is provided which fits 
over the sprocket. In direct line with 
each sprocket tooth is a small hole in 
the collar to take a pin. Thus, as the 
lever on the ratchet is drawn by me- 
chanical means (see Fig. 4), the ratchet 
• Continued on Page 86 



e, • y T— 1 Ml. 



CO 












T 








1 -t - 
1 












1 



RATCHET OPERATED SPROCKET 



HCW RATCHET OPERATES: AS SPROCET 
TVRI.-S, CA1CHA STARTK3 LEVER IS 
DEPRESSED MOMEKTAKILY, SETT IKS 
CAMERA IH KOTIOH FOR A SISOLE 
THUC EXTCSUHE. 



COWSTRUCTIOI! DETAILS, SINGLE FRAME RELEASE FOR MODEL K CWS ICDAX 



78 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



SHOOTING THE 
COLORADO RAPIDS 



INE of the unsung filming ac- 
complishments of the year is a 1600 
foot 1 6mm. Kodachrome record of a 
daring rowboat expedition through the 
treacherous rapids of the Colorado river. 
And incredible as it may seem, the man 
who faced death a dozen times a day for 
19 days in order to make the picture 
paid $1500.00 for the privilege — the 
privilege to die in the raging torrents 
of the Colorado. 

E. E. Olsen, noted Pittsburgh, Pa., 
capitalist and sportsman, has filmed 
just about every unusual subject with 
his 1 6mm. camera. His ski pictures en- 
joy nation-wide renown. It was while 
enjoying a season of skiing and ski film- 
ing at Sun Valley that he learned of 
the annual expedition conducted down 
the Colorado river each summer by Nor- 
man Nevills, intrepid geologist and ex- 
plorer. Since 1938, Nevills has made a 
business of guiding parties of adven- 
ture seekers through the world's most 
spectacular river rapids, charging them 
$1500.00 a head for the experience. 

Olsen's movie camera is the incentive 
that leads him to the most unusual and 
picturesque places in America and when 
he sought reservation in Nevills' 1942 



expedition, he did so for the express 
purpose of recording in Kodachrome 
the daring and incredible passage of men 
in small boats through what is prob- 
ably the most treacherous river rapids in 
the world. 

One usually thinks of the Colorado 
river in the light of the now famous 
Boulder Dam. But the spectacle of this 
mighty dam pales into insignificance 
when compared to the primitive beauty 
of the mighty granite canyons through 
which the Colorado churns in moun- 
tainous rapids above it. 

One of the requirements for those 
taking part in Nevills' expedition which, 
incidentally, are scheduled once each 
year, is that they be in perfect physical 
condition and arrive ready for the ven- 
ture completely tanned from head to 
foot. The sun is so hot in the river val- 
ley that even those with heavy tans 
suffer some sunburn. Olsen arrived six 
• Continued on Page 88 



• Above — vivid sequence from "Facing Your 
Danger" showing light rowboat negotiating a 
treacherous rapid. Note boatman just barely 
visible in middle photo. Below: I — Loading sup- 
plies for journey; 2 — Boats are launched and 
journey begins; 3 — Guide Nevills gives last 





minute instructions in navigation to boat crews; 
4 — all wore life preservers; 5 — Entering a 
rapid; and 8 — Men overboard! All pictures 
frame enlargements from Olsen's original 16mm. 
Kodachrome film. 





HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



• Fig. I — W. C. Etheredge and 16mm. cam- 
era which he built. It possesses all the fea- 
tures of standard 35mm. studio cameras in- 
cluding motors for driving it at sound or 
silent picture speed. 



c4 Custom-built 16mm 
camera ana recorder . . . 



B V 



l 



[F you're interested in sound for 
home movies, tab this article as one you 
may want to dig up and read again the 
day priorities are lifted and the world 
is back to normal. For it concerns build- 
ing, in addition to a fine semi-profes- 
sional 1 6mm. camera, a 16mm. sound 
on film recorder that well may serve as 
the pattern to be followed by the score 
or more movie amateurs who plan to 
build their own. 

It's a cinch that many more amateurs 
will turn to making their own sound 
equipment just as soon as the materials 
are available. And this story should 
prove that a non-professional with suf- 
ficient mechanical and technical know- 
ledge can successfully build his own 



home motion picture sound equipment. 

Both the camera and sound recorder 
on this page were designed and built by 
W. C. Etheredge, a South Carolina ra- 
dio engineer. The camera was construct- 
ed, as he says, "To satisfy my want for 
a 1 6mm. job with all the versatility of 
an old Bell & Howell studio camera I 
once used." This camera was built be- 
fore the advent of priorities and is of 
aluminum throughout except for the 
shafts, gears and other moving parts. 
It features a four-lens revolving turret, 
dissolving shutter, forward and reverse 
movement, film punch, removable ex- 
terior magazines, critical focuser with 
magnifier, rack-over device for preci- 
sion focusing, film counter registering 



to one-tenth of a foot — in short, every- 
thing that the best 35mm. professional 
jobs have. 

In addition to the hand crank, three 
different auxiliary motors are provided 
to drive the camera: a "non-sync" 110- 
volt, 60 cycle A. C. motor geared to 
turn camera at 16 frames per second; a 
synchronous no volt 3 phase motor 
geared for 24 frames per second sound 
speed; and a 6 volt D. C. variable speed 
job for use with storage battery in field 
work. All told, Etheredge says, this 
outfit is as good as his fully equipped 
Cine Special. 

The recorder is what Etheredge calls 
his "laboratory model" — he plans a 
more refined outfit at a later, more op- 
portune date. Constructed after priori- 
ties were declared on essential metals 
and supplies, the recorder was made of 
parts from Etheredge's workshop col- 
lection of junk. Not a single item was 
purchased. 

Second photo at bottom of page (Fig. 
3 ) shows two types of galvanometers 
that were built for the recorder — one 
with a crystal recording unit and the 
other of conventional magnetic type. 
Etheredge could not obtain a galvano- 
meter on the market that did not cost as 
much as his Cine Special, so he built 
two just to be well supplied. 

The galvanometer is the heart of the 
recorder and is not difficult to construct 
if one is familiar with audio circuits, 
according to Etheredge. The trick is to 
make the small mirror behave at all fre- 
quencies. He prefers the crystal to the 
magnetic type as the inherent character- 
istics of magentic recorders requires a 
special type of amplifier with rising 
• Continued on Page 92 



• Fig. 2 — Another accomplishment of Ether- 
edge's is this 16mm. sound on film recorder 
which he built entirely of "junk" and spare 
parts found in his workshop. 



• Fig. 3 — This closeup view shows sound drum 
and the optical and galvanometer systems. 
Two galvanometers, crystal and magnetic, are 
interchangeable, cover all sound requirements. 



• Fig. A — The compact optical system, light 
source and galvanometer mounted in an old 
Pathex camera case. It may be camera- 
mounted for single-system sound. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



Positive v&. (Reversal 

tor TITLES . . . 




mm 



By CEORCE W 



C U S H M A N 



HILE it is probably true that most of the discussions regard 
ing title making concern the direct-positive title which the amateur 
develops himself, not all amateur-made titles are shot on positive film. 
Just as frequently, titles are made on Kodachrome or black and white 
reversal films. But because the direct-positive method offers certain 
advantages for the beginning amateur, this method has been dis- 
cussed at greater lengths. Chief advantage of positive titles is econ- 
omy and the fact any amateur can photograph, develop and edit a 
series of titles in the course of a single evening. Fine grain and ex- 
treme contrast are other advantages. 

On the other hand, reversal film titles have their advantages. The 
title cards are designed and lettered in the same colors or tonal 
values as they will appear on the screen. With the delicate shadings, 
background textures, highlighting and other artistic touches thus 
afforded, it would require the best of experts to work out similar 
title cards in "reverse" for positive film titles. To be able to vis- 
ualize the title exactly as it will appear on the screen is an ad- 
vantage. 

Another important point is the greater speed of most reversal 
films over that of positive. Given the same amount of light, a 
fast reversal film can be exposed on titles at a much smaller 
lens opening. To those amateurs with the best in lens equipment, 
this is not so important; but for the majority of amateurs with 
a popular priced camera fitted with an average lens, a smaller 
stop results in a finer, sharper image and this is highly essential 
in order to produce titles where every word, every letter, is 
sharp and readable even to edges of the title card. 

Those who would use positive film for their titles must, if 
their cameras are still loaded with reversal, wait until the 
camera is empty in order to re-load with positive film. The re- 
versal filmer can shoot his titles on the very film his pictures 
are on, send the film to the laboratory and have pictures and 
titles processed at one and the same time. 

Then there is the ever-present bugaboo of varying film 
thicknesses which often requires constant refocusing of 
projector where the production is made up of two or more 
different film stocks. Where titles and pictures are of the 
same film stock, i. e., all reversal — either all Kodachrome or 
all panchromatic — refocusing is not a problem in project- 
ing the picture. 

Another advantage offered in the production of titles 
on reversal film is that of lighting. It is easier to evenly 
illuminate a black title card with white lettering for 
reversal film than one of white with black letters for 
positive film. And the larger the title card, the more this 
becomes true. In shooting positive titles where the cards 
are white with the lettering black, if the photofloods 
are too close to the cards, the titles will appear unevenly 
lighted on the screen with edges somewhat lighter in 
tone than the center. Uneven lighting will" seldom 
result in an even, over-all density no matter how per- 
fect exposure may be with positive film. 

Where special decorative effects are wanted in titles 

• Continued on Page 92 



81 



" m would b« • us «d 



1 



it i 3 -Tiantoont the \ adly 

the eh atere «iag to « 5ierr a 

c -u3c»«c % ° Cote h~ 
resist* J s of a i t .+ L f iov 




most ^^^^^^^^^B 




*mefk ? ' he ,; «e t e „ M 
"•nethinq «, . 4 e " was <■._ . 





• Pictured here are three types of multiple exposure effects that require winding back film in camera: the lap- 
dissolve, double exposure, and (below) the wipe-off. Accuracy in winding back film to exact starting point is 
essential. 





Multiple £xpo£ure£ 



Pf£ andJ4ow to -Make ZJkem 



OR many amateurs, the words 
"Multiple Exposure" conjur up a com- 
plexity of difficult camera manipula- 
tions, and thus discourages them from 
enjoying the creative fruits as well as 
the labor of this phase of cinematic 
legerdemain. There is really nothing in- 
volved in the execution of a multiple ex- 
posure that is beyond the ability of any 
intelligent amateur, although it does re- 
quire a reasonable amount of patience 
and exercising a few precautions. 

The scope of multiple exposure in- 
cludes anything from a simple lap-dis- 
solve to a highly involved montage; but 
they all are executed on one basic 
method of procedure, i. e: exposure, 



W 



windback, exposure. For a simple lap- 
dissolve, extreme accuracy is not so es- 
sential, although very desirable; but 
for a double-exposed sequence of any 
length — which may include several lap 
dissolves, wipes or synchronized actions 
— it is necessary that we know quite 
accurately the film speed in frames per 
second, as will be pointed out later. 
The easiest method for determining film 
speed of an 8mm. camera, for example, 
is as follows: 

Obtain a length of unexposed double- 
8mm. film or film leader 3 feet in 
length. Measure in 6 inches from each 
end which leaves a center area 2 feet in 
length. A 2-foot length of film will pro- 
vide a test run of 10 seconds if the 
camera is running accurately at 16 
f.p.s. The 6-inch margins at either end 
provide space for marking. 

Thread test strip into the camera in 



• Diagrams illustrate simple film measuring 
stick for dark room (Fig. I) and chart system 
for plotting a sequence of transitions (Fig. 2). 



usual manner, with the first 6 inches 
extending beyond the film gate. Place 
a pencil mark on the film either above 
or below the film gate. Start camera and 
allow it to run the film through for ex- 
actly 10 seconds, stop camera, and 
make pencil mark as before — either 
above or below film gate. By counting 
the number of frames (80 to the foot), 
it is easy to determine whether camera 
is running fast or slow. An approxi- 
mate check can be made with a ruler or 
tape measure instead of by counting the 
frames. 

Where camera is equipped with vari- 
able speed control and the test reveals 
camera is running fast or slow, adjust- 
ing the control will correct the fault, 
and the final test can be made as before 
— with the 3 -foot strip of film. Where 
camera is a single speed job, all calcula- 
tions involved in executing multiple ex- 
posures must be determined on camera's 
actual speed. Thus if the camera is run- 
ning at 14 f.p.s. instead of the normal 

• Continued on Page 89 



*e- 16 FRAMES ->! 



FIdGr. 1 

90 FRAMES 



> 



Ef)CH SPACE REPRESENTS ONE SECOND. 



W EXPOSURE hC 




2^ EXPOSURE 



<d = FADE-IN 
^> = PP.DE- OUT 



LP.P DISSOLVE 
WIPE -ON 



^ — WIPE -OFF 
X = CUT 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



• Invisible splices with greater bonding 
area are made with this amateur-built 
8mm. film splicer. Designed by Al Mor- 
ton, it is one of several successful cine 
gadgets to come out of his home movie 
workshop. 




Clyde Anderson 



cAn amateur-built "full-frame 



0 



|N the basis that a chain is as 
strong as its weakest link, a good many 
amateurs hesitate to edit their films as 
completely as they should, believing 
that each splice is a potential weak link 
in an otherwise strong ribbon of cellu- 
loid. The amateurs are legion whose 
films constantly part during projection 
and who experience difficulty in mak- 
ing splices. This is particularly true 
where 8mm. film is used, due to the 
smaller bonding area provided by the 
splices afforded by most commercial 
splicers. 

This is not intended as an indictment 
of film splicers nor of the practice of 
cutting film apart and splicing it to- 
gether again. Rather it is a revelation 
of the inability of many amateurs thus 
far to make successful, durable splices. 
There exists, of course, countless thou- 
sands of rolls of edited film which are 
projected at regular intervals and which 
have never parted a splice. 

Another objection often raised is that 
splices, sloppily made, show up glaring- 
ly on the screen. Occupying only a por- 
tion of the frame for the bonding area, 
the average splice will show any smudge 
or fingermarks resulting from careless 
splicing as it passes through the pro- 
jector. 

This brings us to the purpose of this 
article: to relate the construction of a 
simple home made splicer that will not 
only make an 8mm. film splice that will 



Splicer for 8mm film* 



easily pass the proejetor film gate, but 
one which will be undetectable on the 
screen. I have been using the splicer I 
built with most excellent results for 
the past four years and the fact I'm in- 
variably asked: "How do you make a 
picture like that without splices?" tes- 
tifies to its success. The pictures or films 
referred to have contained as many as 
two hundred splices — "invisible splices." 

The secret of this "invisible" splice 
lies in making the splice one full frame 
in length, which is practical with 8mm. 
film. Instead of scraping the emulsion 
from half a frame and overlapping the 
film half a frame, causing edge of splice 
to come in the middle of the picture 
area, as is customary with most splicers, 
the splicer about to be described pro- 
vides for removing emulsion from the 
whole picture frame and overlapping 
one full frame of the adjoining scene. 
This brings edge of the splice on the 
frame line which is always masked off 
by the projector. 

The larger overlap, too, gives added 
strength, and splices made with inade- 
quate or poor quality cement are less 
liable to part during projection because 
of the greater bonding area afforded. 



M 



The full frame splicer is so simple 
in construction that it may be put to- 
gether by any amateur handy with 
tools (and possessing them, of course), 
from materials still easily acquired and 
outside the claims of priorities. A list 
of the material follows and in many in- 
stances substitutes may be used without 
impairing effectiveness or design: 

1 baseboard— y 4 "x 4 1/ 2 "x 7 " 

2 pieces flat metal zy^'yizYz 
2 large gate hasps 

10 wood screws 
4 shingle nails 
1 "Gem" style razor blade 
1 piece of flat metal file 
1 metal rod or manicurist's orange 
stick. 

First operation is to drill and counter- 
sink three holes in the flat metal pieces 
which form the table of the splicer — 
two holes at back of splicer and one at 
front, as shown in photo. The plates are 
then mounted on the baseboard which 
should previously be sanded, varnished 
and otherwise finished ready for the 
splicer parts. They should be so mount- 
ed that a narrow space separates the 
two — just wide enough to permit the 

• Continued on Page 91 



83 



PACE 84 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 




Field Glass Telephoto 

Ordinary field-glasses or binoculars 
may be combined with camera lens to 
produce a telephoto lens that gives very 
satisfactory results. Nor does it require 
dismembering the binoculars. The glass- 
es may be fixed before the camera as 
shown in accompanying sketch so that 
one unit acts as the telephoto and the 
other the focusing viewfinder. 

Drawing is self explanatory. The base 
"A" may be made of plywood or other 
light material. The support "B" is in 
two pieces and clamps the binoculars 
in place before the camera lens. Position 
of support on base "A" will depend up- 
on make and size of binoculars and 
make of camera. 

This idea is particularly adaptable to 
cine cameras having lenses that are not 
interchangeable and therefore have no 
telephoto lenses otherwise available for 
them. To use, set camera lens at infinity 
if lens is in focusing mount; otherwise 
no other adjustment is necessary aside 
from focusing the binoculars on object. 
— Raymond Mattern, Baltimore, Md. 



THE EXPE 



Safelight 

A safe and satisfactory red safelight. 
for the darkroom may be made as fol- 
lows: Attach small porcelain lamp soc- 
ket to work table, running the wires 
through table top. Fit small seven-watt 
bulb in socket and cover with a red plas- 
tic cup or water tumbler which may be 
purchased from most variety stores. A 
putty or other plastic seal should be 
placed around edge of cup to seal in any 
stray light that may issue between edge 
of cup and table top. — Richard S. Tay- 
lor, Delmar, Iowa. 




Auxiliary Adjustment 

The framing device of most projec- 
tors is often so hard to locate in the 
dark that burned fingers invariably re- 
sult in searching for it. I remedied this 
trouble by attaching an auxiliary fram- 
ing control to my projector as per ac- 
companying diagram which is self 
explanatory. No priority materials are 
required. A small bolt and nut, a 
length of wire and a piece of suitable 
material (wood, fiber, or metal) for the 
lever are required and these are readily 
available. — Geo. C. JnnkJn, Erie, Pa. 

Flop-over Title Gadget 

Illustration shows simple flop-over 
device which I made for my Eastman 
titler, although it is adaptable to other 
makes of typewriter titlers. Device is 
placed at end of titler after the regular 
title card holder is removed. It was 
made from wood except for the fittings 
on which the rotating card holder is sus- 
pended. These are metal curtain brack- 
ets purchased at the dime store and at- 
tached to the two upright members as 
shown in sketch in next column. 



RIMENTAL 



CURTftlH BRACKS T 




K >1 



Quarter-inch wood dowel, inserted in- 
to either side of the title card holder at 
the center, fit snugly into the curtain 
brackets, permitting smooth revolving 
action in making the flop-over effect. 

In use, the first title is placed on one 
side of the card holder and the title to 
follow it in the flop-over action is 
placed on the opposite side, and in such 
position as will bring it up in proper 
position when the card holder is re- 
volved or flopped-over. Dimensions 
shown in illustration are for the East- 
man titler. — Vat Barge, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Camera Speed Check 

On the theory that some cameras run 
faster when "warmed up" after operat- 
ing for some time, here is a method by 
which I checked to determine if my 
camera maintains perfect 16 f.p.s. speed. 
Placing a pocket watch fitted with a 
second hand in the title position of my 
typewriter titler, I photographed it for 
five seconds. 

The processed film enabled me to ob- 




serve where the second hand passed the 
minute marks on the watch dial and to 
count the number of frames between 
each second movement. 

For me this method also solved the 
mystery as to why the marching gait of 
a parade appeared to change in the re- 
sults of films shot by two cameras used 



PASS 'EM ALONG! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they duplicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 
use. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PAGE 85 



CINE WORKSHOP 



in photographing the event. Film shot 
with a model K Cine Kodak indicated 77 
frames in 5 seconds whereas an old Mod- 
el B showed 84. — R. C- Heagey, Lan- 
caster, Pa. 



PEN OR SHARP / 




INSTRUMENT 










WAX PAPER 

X- 


\w 










J 

BLOTTING PAPER 



Titling Idea 

Here is an innovation in title mak- 
ing that proved very successful for me. 
Taking a sheet of heavy transparent wax 
paper free from wrinkles, I placed it 
over a piece of blotting paper that pro- 
vided a cushion surface. With a clean 
dry pen, I scribed the lettering of my 
title on the wax paper. Action of the 
pen caused the lettering to appear white. 
The wax paper title was next laid over a 
picture postcard and the two inserted in 
my titler. The result was very pleasing. 
The background was nicely diffused and 
the lettering in the wax paper photo- 
graphed very well. 

This method is easier than lettering 
with ink on glass or celluloid and per- 
mits using the backgrounds over and 
over again. — Harold J. Fraulob, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 




Double-duty Tripod 

Here's an idea that will enable your 
adjustable screen tripod also to serve as 
a photoflood stand. Photos show how I 
added two folding arms to take photo- 
flood reflectors. Arms are of 1" square 
pine, each 23 inches long. They were 
bolted to top of tripod as shown with 
a quarter-inch bolt fitted with a wing 
nut. Arms are adjustable to any posi- 
tion and when folded, do not interfere 



with normal use of screen at any height 
Lockwashers placed between bolt head, 
between the arms, and again at the wing 
nut will insure necessary tension to keep 
arms firmly in place when extended. — 
N. A. Gainen, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Room Light Control 

A handy remote control, for switch- 
ing room lights on and off when pro- 
jecting pictures, may be made as fol- 
lows: Obtain a 3-way connecting plug, 
take it apart, and cut the copper con- 
nections within and re-arrange same as 
shown in diagram, making sure to in- 
sulate between the two copper strips as 
indicated in Fig. 2. 

With the 3-way plug thus altered, its 
cord may be plugged into a baseboard 
outlet. Extension cord from floor lamp 
is plugged into one end as shown and an 
extension cord fitted with a pendant 



FIG. J 



TRKE 3 WRY PLUG 
H PART COT COPPER 
CONNECTIONS RNV 
RE-RRRDNGE RS PER 
PRR WlNG 

3 WRY PLUG 



IT 



■ PENDANT 
OFF & ON 
SWITCH 



CHECK LENGTH- 
If TOO LONG tV/ii. 
CAUSE A 

''SHORT 




IN SI/LUTE HERE 
WHERE COPPER 
PLATES PASS 



F/G. 2 



switch plugged into the rema ning open- 
ing. This last extension should be long 
enough to reach the projector where the 
switch may be controlled by the opera- 
tor. — Lyle Skill, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rewind Brake 

Simple rewind brake may be con- 
structed as shown here. Brake consists 
of leather lined strip of wood which is 
held against reel on rewind by means of 
stout rubber band. Brake operates on 
novel hinge arrangement consisting of 
two screw eyes and two screws. Brake 
is mounted on editing board and its 



gadget*, trick* & 
shortcut* contri- 
buted by tinebug* 



Tasle* Strua on 
bolk ends ojtth 
Curfictfieks 



.Ct*trr 



r?Me- 

Lent het- Tin be Dad i 

y/ecJtitSnke. 




Hit SfrmoHcrt 



tension controlled by means of a string 
attached to free end. Diagram shows 
construction details. — Paul E. Stocker, 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 




Extends Record Playing 

By removing one small part from my 
phonograph recorder, I found that I 
could cut a record at much slower speed 
and thus obtain ample sound on one rec- 
ord for one reel of 8mm. film. 

The change was simple, takes less 
than a minute to perform on my record- 
er, and doesn't cost a cent. Accompany- 
ing diagram shows how it was done. 
The turntable was removed from the 
• Continued on Page 93 



PACE 86 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 




WHERE TO RENT OR BUY 8MM. and 16MM. FILMS 



1 O augment your home movie shows, make use of the fine libraries 
of rental films, both sound and silent, ma ntained by your photo dealer for 
owners of 8mm. and i6mm. projectors. Rental rates are surprisingly low and 
new films are added at regular intervals. Dealers listed bslow will gladly assist 
with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 



CALIFORNIA 

HOLLYWOOD 

Bailey Film Service 
1651 Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
716 N. La Brea Ave. 

Castle's Inc. 
1529 Vine Street 

LOS ANGELES 

Films Incorporated 
1709 W. 8th Street 

Robert Crawford Pictures 
1702 Kingsley Dr. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
Photo & Sound, Inc. 
153 Kearny St. 



CONNECTICUT 

WATERBURY 

Multiprises 

100 E. Main St. 

P. O. Box 1125 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1221 G St., N. W. 

ILLINOIS 

BERWYN 

Colonial Camera Shop 
6906 Windsor Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1825 Larchmont Ave. 

Films Incorporated 
64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 



INDIANA 

INDIANAPOLIS 

W. Stuart Bussey 

17 East St. Joseph St. 



IOWA 



MASON CITY 



Decker Bros. 

209 No. Federal Ave. 



KANSAS 



WICHITA 



Jeff's Camera Shop 
139 N. Broadway 

Lewis Film Exchange 
216 East 1st St. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



Don Elder's Film Library 
739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 

Frank Lane and Company 
5 Little Building 



MICHIGAN 



DETROIT 



Detroit Camera Shop 
325 State Street 



NEW YORK 



KENMORE 



Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
281 1 Delaware Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Films Incorporated 
330 W. 42nd St. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 45th St. 

Haber & Fink, Inc. 
12-14 Warren St. 

Medo Photo Supply 
15 West 47th St. 

National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 

Nu-Art Films, Inc. 
145 West 45th Street 



OHIO 



CINCINNATI 



Ralph V. Haile & Assoc. 
215 Walnut St. 



DAYTON 



Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 



OREGON 



PORTLAND 



Films Incorporated 
314 S. W. 9th Avenue 



TEXAS 



DALLAS 



National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 
2024 Main St. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON 



Elmer B. Simpson 
816 W. Virginia St. 



Single 3rame 

(Release . . . 

© Continued from PageyS 

engages the sprocket and rotates it one- 
sixth of a turn to effect the single frame 
exposure. In my case I used the solenoid 
timing apparatus described in the Octo- 
ber issue to operate the single frame de- 
vice. An ordinary spring projector belt 
supplied the necessary flexible link be- 
tween the solenoid and the camera con- 
trol lever. 

Complete construction details of all 
necessary parts for the single-frame re- 
lease are given in the accompanying dia- 
grams and anyone skilled with a metal 
lathe can make the parts readily. The 
metal required is negligible. 

For those who wish to fit their cam- 
eras with this helpful accessory, a bit of 
advice: before drilling hole in camera 
case, for the filister-head machine screw, 
remove the camera motor. Otherwise 
small b'ts of metal from the drilling 
operation may get into the camera 
mechanism. To remove the motor mech- 
anism from my model K Cine Kodak, I 
first removed the lens. The two elements 
(front and top) of the waist-level view- 
finder were next removed. The winding 
crank was detached by unscrewing the 
square-head retaining bolt counter- 
clockwise. It was necessary to take out 
the socket into which crank handle rests, 
and this was accomplished by first re- 
moving three small retaining screws. 
Final step was to loosen and remove 
camera starting lever and three large 
screws in back of camera. This left the 
mechanism free from the case. 

Interior of camera was carefully ex- 
amined and a pencil mark made on one 
of the gear teeth plus a corresponding 
mark on one tooth of the rack of the 
film footage indicator. By studying 
function of this mechanism carefully, I 
found it could easily be removed by 
taking out a single small screw. 

To remove the mechanism assembly 
from the camera case, I grasped the low- 
er reel spindle firmly and pulled back- 
ward and upward until the chassis was 
clear of the case. It is extremely import- 
ant for anyone, before beginning any 
work on this camera, to carefully study 
the function of each part, and not to 
remove a single screw until the purpose 
of each is fully understood. It's a little 
slower this' way, but costly errors will 
be avoided. 

I next marked and drilled hole for 
the machine screw in camera case ac- 
cording to dimensions given in drilling 
pattern in Fig. 5. The motor chassis 
was re-installed in the case and fastened 
temporarily. Wads of tissue paper were 
packed between the motor frame and 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PAGE 87 



moving parts to prevent particles of 
dust and metal from the drilling opera- 
tion to lodge in the works. Drill was in- 
serted through hole in case and a corre- 
sponding hole drilled in the motor 
frame. Final step was to tap holes for 
the 3 16x32 machine screw. After this 
operation, I cemented a small felt wash- 
er over the hole inside the case. A disc 
of felt was cemented over the hole on 
the underside of the motor frame, pur- 
pose of which was to protect against 
any particles of dust or metal filtering 
through to the motor. 

As the camera case is of soft alumi- 
num and rather thin, it is important 
that extreme care be exercised in insert- 
ing and tightening the machine screw 
each time. Carelessness will result in 
stripping the threads. 

The mechanically operated ratchet 
sprocket is shown mounted on the cam- 
era in Fig. 4. Also shown is the flexible 
connecting link between lever and the 
solenoid (not in picture) . The curved 
lever acts as a counter-balance for the 
ratchet and is aided by the heavy rub- 
ber band extending from it to the stick 
extending from the camera base. Ratchet 
is adjusted for various tensions by 
changing position of rubber band on 
stick. Rubber band is attached to small 
peg which is inserted in one of the sev- 
eral holes in stick. (For further data 
concerning use of this apparatus, please 
refer to the article on time-lapse pho- 
tography on page 388 of the October, 
1942 issue. — Ed.) 

Hand operated, the single frame re- 
lease may be employed in animation 
work, for superimposing titles, and for 
achieving various trick cinematic ef- 
fects. Using an electric solenoid control, 
the gadget may be used to operate cam- 
era in filming time-lapse movies of bud- 
ding flowers and growing plants, etc. 
The cinematic accomplishments this sin- 
gle-frame release provides far outweighs 
the modest cost and labor involved in 
making it. 

~Movie o 

the -Month . . . 

• Continued from Page 75 

finally edited sequence maintains the 
maximum of interest. 

Indeed, this same skill is evident 
throughout the entire picture from the 
opening sequence in the living room to 
the final scene. The production, as a 
whole, displays the filmer's fine under- 
standing of composition and camera an- 
gles. His closeups of the various inhabi- 
tants of the zoo are commendable and 
exposure in every scene is what top 
cinebugs prefer to term as "on-the- 
nose." * 

Editing is a masterful job with two 





On Top 

by Ray Atkeson 



On your winter photo excursions, you may 
not be favored with the dramatic locations 
which Ray Atkeson, another Master en- 
thusiast, enjoys. But you'll be able to make 
the most of an;/ scene you shoot, with a 
quick reading from your Master. Because 
with your Master's quickly selective ex- 
posure dial you can determine, exactly, 
your negative results. Further, the highly 
selective viewing angle, and the precise 
WESTON instrument and ^hoto-cell in your 
Master, give added assurance of complete 
picture satisfaction. 

This winter, however, this word of cau- 
tion is suggested . . . take special care oi 
your exposure meter. For there can be no 
more WESTONS 'til victory . . . and even re- 
pair service v/iil be very limited because 
every Weston instrument specialist has 
an all-importcnt war job to do. An extra 
bit of care will insure exrra years 
of precise service from your 
Master. Weston Electrical In- 
strument Corporation. 585 Fre- 
linghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J. 



WESTON gyrttm'TketeM 



I HELP SHORTEN 
I THE WAR! 

I BUY MORE BONDS. . . 

■ AND KEEP ON BUYING MORE BONDS 



No matter how often this message is brought to our attention . . . 
no matter how many bonds we buy . . . it's not often enough - nor 
bonds enough. 

Although kin-o-lux efforts are devo'ed to supplying the govern- 
ment . . . you can still buy kin-o-lux movie films and other acces- 
sories at your dealer. 



KIN-O-LUX 

INC. 

105 WEST 40th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



PAGE 88 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



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"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS." Three new Sensa- 
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like them. Stamp brings catalogues. 

"PARTY RECORDS." Something new in snappy 
adult entertainment. Stamp brings catalogues. 

FILMS EXCHANGED— Only first class subjects 
in good condition accepted. Give details about your 
films. State subjects, types desired. SWAP your 200 
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$2.00: or your 400 ft. sound film and $3.50 for an- 
other film. Stamp brinps catalogues. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
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FOTOFADE DTE for making Chemical Fades. .. 1.25 

FOTOFADE WIPF.-OFF TAPE, per roll B0 

CIN'ETINTS. Set <i Colors with Instructions... 3.25 

DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each 35 

HOME MOVIES. Back Issues, 1937-38-39 15 

Not all months in any year, 1940-41-42 30 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS — Each 

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EXTRA CANS. Double 8mm. and Single 8 size 10c 

MO ft. and 50 ft. 16mm 15c 

MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FIILM 
Speed 6 in. Photoflood Light. Laboratory Packed. 
Dbl. 8—33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; 400 ft. $5.50; 
Sgl. 8—33 ft. 45c; 100 ft. $1.00; 400 ft. $3.50; 
16mm. 100 ft. $1.25: 400 ft. $5.00. 
Clear. Purplehaze. Yellow, Amber, Special Blue 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orders 
Cash. Check or M. O. for quick service. 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

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17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 



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or more shots, taken at various angles, 
devoted to each animal or subject with- 
in the zoo. This technique provides the 
spectator ample study of each subject 
and often in a manner that could not 
be had by actually visiting the zoo. 
Where the visitor's study of an animal 
would be restricted in proximity by the 
cages and protective fences surrounding 
the enclosures, Evans' telephoto lens 
brings to the screen frequent closeup 
shots of the most interesting animals 
and birds for prolonged and leisurely ob- 
servation. 

The visit over, the family are indi- 
cated, in a single shot, leaving the zoo. 
Next, the little boy is shown back home. 
He has just been put to bed. Surround- 
ed by toy animals, he reminisces his ex- 
citing visit to the zoo, while seated be- 
for the fireplace in the next room are his 
parents discussing the pleasures of their 



visit to the man-made jungle. This scene 
dissolves to a closeup of the dancing 
flames in the fireplace and the end title 
is dissolved over this, ending in a fade- 
out. 

The titling is a highlight of this pic- 
ture, both from the point of text com- 
position, and photographic accomplish- 
ment. Evans demonstrates rare skill in 
executing dissolves with professional 
smoothness. There's none of the jumpy 
finishes so often seen in amateur double- 
fades, nor are dissolves used to excess 
just for the mere effect. 

Most of those privileged to see this 
picture on the screen will agree that 
Evans has, by virtue of good camera 
technique and a thorough understand- 
ing of continuity, made an interesting 
and entertaining picture of an other- 
wise simple and easy-to-film subject. 



Shooting Colorado (Rapid* ... 



• Continued from Page 79 

weeks in advance of the expedition's 
starting date and aided Neville in pre- 
paring the boats for the trip, during 
which time he became acclimated to the 
rigors of Arizona sun, wind and rain. 
Six men in all had chartered places in 
the expedition and within a few weeks 
the daring sextet had assembled and 
made ready to start. 

In the meantime, Olsen prepared a 
special rubberized water-proof bag for 
his camera that would allow the camera 
to be completely submerged in the river 
waters if necessary without damage to 
either camera or lens. By an ingenious 
contrivance designed by Olsen, a water- 
tight flap, motivated by a spring, snap- 
ped shut automatically whenever the 
camera starting button was released to 
normal position. Thus, if Olsen should 
be thrown from the boat into the water 
(which he was three and four times 
every day) the safety, water-tight cap 
would automatically close over the lens 
opening in the water-proof bag. And be- 
cause of this ingenious device, Olsen 
was able to make motion pictures at 
will during the eventful trip and bring 
the films back with him undamaged. 

Which brings us to the subject of 
how Olsen protected his films — both 
exposed and unexposed — in the extreme- 
ly high temperatures that prevailed. 
Daily average temperatures ranged about 
125 0 F. — ruinous to motion picture 
film. However, Norman Nevills had 
profited by the experience, and misfor- 
tunes, of other photgraphers who had 
accompanied him on previous expedi- 
tions and now had an insulated box 
provided for the express purpose of fur- 
nishing safe storage for his guest's films. 
Olsen's Kodachrome film supply was 



packed in this refrigerator-like box and 
as he unloaded exposed film, it was im- 
mediately placed within this box to be 
kept there until completion of the trip. 

Olsen's camera is a 16mm. Magazine 
Cine Kodak fitted with a one-inch lens. 
Accessory lenses consisted of a 3 -inch 
telephoto and a 15 mm. wide angle 
lens. It was impossible to use a tripod 
and it is significant of Olsen's ability 
as a cinetographer that he accomplished 
some remarkable shots with his 3 -inch 
lens and the camera hand held. 

The accompanying photos are frame 
enlargements from Olsen's film and 
graphically illustrate the highlights of 
the trip. After the daring embryo ex- 
plorers had gathered at Norman Nevills' 
headquarters near the upper Colorado, 
the three half-ton rowboats were lifted 
on trailers and trundled over twisting 
mountain trails to a calm cove on the 
river above the first rapid. 

Here the party took to the boats and 
their unforgettable adventure began. 
Already Olsen had filmed considerable 
footage for opening sequences of his 
documentary and he now faced the triple 
threat task of navigating one of the 
boats through the rapids, obtaining 
movies of the boats in action and avoid- 
ing death through capsizing in the 
churning waters. 

In all, 289 rapids were safely tra- 
versed without injury, or loss of life or 
equipment. The boats traveled 350 of 
the most treacherous miles of the river. 
But they were the most beautiful of 
all. The party entered canyons of the 
Colorado that had seen but few white 
men, traversed mountain trails in side 
trips untouched by human feet prob- 
ably for more than a century. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PACE 89 



On the screen, Olsen's film unfolds 
in a glory of color for which Arizona 
is famous. Opening scenes set the locale 
nicely, then we are shown Nevills' head- 
quarters and see men at work putting 
the boats in shape for the journey. Iden- 
tifying each member of the party in in- 
teresting closeups, Olsen then recorded 
the overland trip of the boats to the 
river's edge. And here, after what was 
to be their last substantial meal for 
days, the party take to the boats. The 
craft are towed to mid-stream by a mo- 
torboat where they enter the mild 6 
mile-per-hour current above the rap- 
ids, and thus begins their perilous jour- 
ney. 

Filming alternately from boat and 
land, Olsen secured some of the most 
vivid and spectacular scenes of the boats 
shooting the rapids. The action of every 
boat as it traversed every one of the 
289 rapids was filmed, although only 
the most dramatic of this footage was 
used in the final editing of the picture. 

Highlights are the several slow mo- 
tion sequences of boats shooting the 
rapids. These were filmed at 64 frames 
per second. Capsizes were frequent — 
about four a day — but Olsen succeeded 
in filming only one of them. "They al- 
ways occurred just as I laid my camera 



down or while I was reloading film," 
said Olsen. 

Most vivid and awe-inspiring are 
scenes of the turbulant rapids — huge 
rollers of muddy water rushing over 
boulders submerged fifty to seventy- 
five feet below. Speed of the rapids is 
estimated at thirty miles per hour. 

The party on several occasions ex- 
plored some of the interesting canyons 
and rocky cliffs in vicinity of the river. 
They found ruins of cliff dwellers, sub- 
stantial windowed rooms hewn from 
solid rock in the cliffs edging the Col- 
orado. They found - the skeleton of 
some unfortunate explorer who preced- 
ed them; and farther down the river 
the battered hulk of a light rowboat 
which probably brought him to his 
tragic fate. 

The last of the rapids safely navigat- 
ed, the dauntless crew of the boats en- 
ter the calm waters of the Colorado just 
above Lake Mead and eventually termi- 
nate their voyage near Boulder Dam. 

Preparations are now being made to 
add a sound track of Olsen's narrative 
accompanied by background music and 
sound effects and when this is achieved, 
undoubtedly prints of the film will be 
given widespread exhibition, enabling 
interested movie amateurs to enjoy this 
superbly photographed document. 



staking, multiple expoiurei 



• Continued from Page S2 

16, and it is desired to make a 2 second 
lap-dissolve, it may be executed by mak- 
ing a 2 second fadeout, then winding 
the film back 28 frames (equivalent of 
2 seconds at 14 f.p.s.), then making a 
2 second fade-in. 

Where the filmer has a mechanical 
fading or wipe-off device operated by a 
spring motor mechanism, it should be 
carefully checked and timed as well as 
the camera. Here the film test strip 
may be put to good use again: thread 
film in camera with the lead end marked 
as previously described. Start camera 
and fading device simultaneously, al- 
lowing the device to run continuously 
to complete 4 cycles — fadeout, fadein, 
fadeout, fadein — stopping the camera 
as accurately as possible at conclusion 
ot the last fade-in. Mark stopping point 
on film, as before, and count the num- 
ber of frames between starting and 
stopping point. Divide number of frames 
by number of transition cycles and this 
will give the number of frames of film 
required by each complete cycle of the 
effect device. 

Next to be considered is winding 
back the film. To those who are fortu- 
nate in having a backwind on their 
camera, this operation presents no prob- 



lem. Those who have to wind back film 
the hard way — fumbling gingerly in 
some light-tight closet — don't let the 
prospect of this chore discourage you. 
It becomes quite easy after the third 
or fourth try. It's advisable, though, to 
equip the improvised darkroom where 
the windback operations are to take 
place, with a table and chair so the 
work can be carried on comfortably 
and with greater speed. 

The "blind" method of winding back 
film in the dark involves some guess 
work when it comes to measuring the 
amount of film to be wound back. 
Some amateurs notch the film; others 
tit bits of thread through one of the 
sprocket holes and depend upon their 
sense of feel to locate the marked point 
ir. the dark. A simpler method is to em- 
ploy use of a special darkroom measur- 
ing stick such as the one shown in 
Fig. 1. This consists of a strip of 
heavy cardboard step-notched in sections 
equivalent to sixteen frames. With this 
gadget it is possible to lay it over the 
film and by feeling and counting the 
number of steps, measure the film to 
be wound back on the basis of one 
notch-step section per second. 

Another important step is timing. 



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MAKE YOUR OWN TITLES 

in Color or Black or White 
• Design Your Title to Fit Your Film • 
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SEND FOR FREE SAMPLE TITLE KIT 

A-to-Z MOVIE ACCESSORIES 

175 Fifth Ave. Dept. H47 New York. N. Y. 



GORGEOUS GIRL MOVIES 8-1 6MM. 

Also Waikiki in Kodachrome, Color sample of 
latter, 10c or longer projection length color 
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8mm. Double, 25 Ft $1.00 

PRICES INCLUDE PROCESSING 

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Write today for our catalogue of finished subjects. 

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630 Ninth Ave. Film Centtr Bldg.. N. Y. 



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130 W. 46th St. 1801 Larchmont. Chicago 
New York City 716 N. Labrea. Hollywood 



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ERNMENT 
AND THE 
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WOOD PRO- 
DUCERS DO 



PACE 90 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



(ffijtfffah FOR NEGATIVES 




Real Gift for a Friend or Yourself 

Bookshelf size. Blue, green, maroon, black. 
Contents book lists up to 720 negatives. 

No. 300 (Illustrated) for negatives up to 3V 8 x5" 

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CUT HOME MOVIE COSTS 

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versible Film for finest results — 

lowest cost. 
16mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

100-ft Roll, only $2.50 

Rating Scheincr 18 
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25 ft. Double 8, only. $1.25 
16mm Projection Reel — 200 ft. 
reel — 35c each. 
Minimum order 6 reels 
Write for prices for developing 
and processing for 8mm. and 
16mm. films bought elsewhere. 

VISUAL INSTRUCTION 
SUPPLY CORP. 

1757 Broadway. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Dept. 12 





KODACHROME SLIDES 

OF HISTORICAL 
PHILADELPHIA 
35mm. Kodachromes in Ready- 
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Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross House, 
etc. 50 cents each. Send for (tee list. 

N & GOODMAN 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



8mm. 16mm. 
Hollywood Outdoor Film 

Excellent Outdoor Rim Wide Latitude 

25 Ft. Dbl. 8, $1.25 100 Ft. 16, $2.50 

including machine processing 

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Despite Rumors Plenty of Film Available 



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for simple z- or 3 -second effects a 
reasonable degree of accuracy may be 
obtained by guesswork after a little 
practice. But for long sequences involv- 
ing several effects of synchronized ac- 
tion in two or more exposures, timing 
must be absolutely accurate. I have 
used, with considerable success, a metro- 
nome for timing my multiple exposure 
effects. Set at a beat of 60, the metro- 
nome gives accurate audible timing of 1 
beat per second. And being extremely 
audible at even great distances, it frees 
the cameraman from the necessity of 
having to watch a clock or stop-watch. 
By attaching a small piece of paper to 
the pendulum, the metronome's beats 
can be counted visually. 



When making long sequences of mul- 
tiple exposures, I lay out a chart marked 
off in seconds, as shown in Fig. 2. All 
action and effects are indicated on the 
chart at the proper points by symbols, 
with details of the action written on a 
separate instruction sheet. 

By following these tried and proven 
methods, multiple exposures become 
highly interesting as well as successful. 
Smooth transitions are as important to 
the success of home movies today as 
they are to professional films. Be pa- 
tient and practice. Be willing to expe- 
riment, and you'll find this phase of 
movie making will come easy as or- 
dinary filming. 



War -time movie ihowi . . . 



• Continued from Page 76 

charge of experienced projector owners 
whenever there are sound films to be 
shown for a good cause. 

It is now possible to obtain in sub- 
standard film, prints of professional re- 
leases possessing all the entertainment 
value of many current theatre attrac- 
tions so that it is possible for anyone 
planning a Defense Stamp show, for ex- 
ample, to provide a balanced two-hour 
sound film show at low cost. Available 
films range from condensed news di- 
gests and animated cartoons to multi- 
reel feature films. Many of these films 
are available in color as well as sound, 
and most of the single reel subjects are 
to be had in silent versions with ade- 
quate explanatory titles. 

The number of film producers or dis- 
tributors catering to the substandard 
field has increased materially during the 
past year with more planning to enter 
the field as the certainty of wider post- 
war use of 1 6mm. non-theatrical, edu- 
cational and training films becomes 
more apparent. A list of some of the 
foremost producers, distributors and 
rental agencies for substandard films 
follows, together with a necessarily 
brief list of their most recent film of- 
ferings: 

Castle Films 

West Point — Symbol of Our Army 
U. S. Carrier Fights Back 
Yanks Invade Africa 
Russia Strikes Back 
Victory Over Rommel 

Post Pictures Corp. 

The Housekeeper's Daughter 
Topper Takes A Trip 
Of Mice and Men 
Captain Fury 
Zenobia 

Certified Film Distrs. 

Circus Capers 
Gypped In Egypt 



Jail Break 
Toytown Tale 
Uneasy Three 

Kenwood Films 

Africa Safari 
Our Navy In Action 
Waikiki Hula Girls 
Highlights of Hawaii 
America Marches On 

Nu-Art Films 

America Sings 
Abraham Lincoln 

Walter D. Gutlohn 

This Is India 

Socks (Sport Film) 

Middle East 

How To Read A Map 

Commonwealth Pictures 

Charlie Chaplin Festival 
Under Secret Orders 
Night of Terror 

Filmosound Libraries 
(Bell & Howell) 

The Real Caribbean 
Friends of the Air 
Trails of North Africa 
Liberian Republic 
Caucasian Barrier 

Hollywood Film Enterprises 

Walt Disney Cartoons 
Walter Lantz Cartoons 
Hugh Harmon Cartoons 
Christie Comedies 

Obviously a true picture of the al- 
most unlimited source of 8mm. and 
1 6mm films available for home and 
sound projectors can be had only by 
reviewing the catalogs of these and 
other film distributors. In many of the 
catalogs will be found every type of 
non-theatrical motion picture as well 
as educational and instructional sub- 
jects. Such catalogs are free to respon- 
sible interested parties and readers are 
invited to write to the following for 
free copies: 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PACE 91 



Castle Films, 

<o Rockefeller I'la/a, 

New York, N .Y. 

Post Pictures Corp., 
723 Seventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Nu-Art Films 

i 45 W. 4J th St., New York, N. Y. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc., 
25 West 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Commonwealth Pictures, Corp., 
729 Seventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Filmosound Libraries 
c/o Bell & Howell Co., 
1 801 Larchmont Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Hollywood Film Enterprises, 
6060 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood, Calif. 

Where it is desired only to rent films, 
many subjects released by the above dis- 
tributors are available from the well es- 
tablished film rental libraries to be 
found in every large city. Many of 
these libraries rent films by mail at sur- 
prisingly small cost. On another page 
in this issue will be found a catalogue 
of film rental libraries and readers are 
invited to write freely of each for their 
lists of available films. 



Jull frame 

Splicer 



• • • 



• Continued from Page X} 

razor blade to pass snugly between 
them. At this time, mark path of the 
razor blade on wood block as a guide 
to cutting a slot there later. 

Next take a piece of film that was ex- 
posed in your camera — and this is im- 
portant because the frame line varies 
with different makes of cameras — and 
lay it across the two metal plates so 
that one of the frame lines lies exactly 
over the space allowed for the razor 
blade. With the film thus in place — and 
it is wise to get a little assistance here 
— carefully mark position for sprocket- 
hole pins. There will be four pins in 
all, so outline the third sprocket-hole on 
either side of the cutting line and again, 
the third sprocket hole from outside 
edge of either plate. Best results will be 
obtained by indicating the exact center 
of each sprocket hole on the plates. 

The plates may then easily be drilled 
and the pins, fashioned from the shingle 
nails inserted. Slightly countersink 
the holes on both sides of the plates. 
After filing thin the nail heads, insert 
them from bottom sides of plates and 
solder them in place. Then file to size 
to fit film sprocket holes easily and fin- 
ish with emery paper. When an unbrok- 
en strip of film is placed over the pins, 



the film should la}' absolutely flat, not 
tear the sprocket holes, and the frame 
line of the frame to be cut should lie 
directly over the cutting line. 

The clamps or pressure plates are 
made from the hasps. If the hasp swings 
too freely or there is any play in the 
hinge, remove the hinge pin and squeeze 
the center sleeve in a vise so that when 
pin is returned, the hasp will open and 
close smoothly without side play. This is 
very important, for if there is any side 
play, the film cutting will be inconsist- 
ent and uneven. 

Disregard the countersunk holes for 
screws already drilled in the hasp and 
drill new ones near the hinge. These 
should be slightly elongated so that the 
h?sp may be adjusted after being screwed 
into place. File edge of hasp straight 
and mount with round-head screws. 
Screw locations should be marked in the 
center of the elongated holes when edge 
of hasp is one full frame to the left of 
the cutting slot. Now because this hasp 
is adjustable sideways you will be able 
to remove exactly one full frame of 
emulsion with the piece of broken file 
used as a scraper. Of course you must 
drill a hole in the hasp where it strikes 
the pin so it will lie flat on splicer table. 

Mount the second hasp so that it 
comes down just to the right of the first 
pin and drill a hole for the second pin. 
The pressure lock is mounted between 
the two hasps and up front where it 
won't interfere with scraping. The se- 
cret of a good flat splice that will go 
through the projector without trouble 
is to use lots of pressure where the two 
films overlap. In spite of the simplicity 
of this lock it exerts great pressure and 
provides an excellent splice. Made of a 
piece of bar metal '/4 inch square and 
about 1 inch long, it is fastened to the 
base through the metal with a round- 
head screw with a spacer slightly thin- 
ner than the hasp on the bottom and a 
thin washer on top to keep the screw 
from tightening or loosening when the 
lock is turned. Bevel opposite sides of 
the bottom so that when the lock is 
turned it will ride up over the hasps 
and force them down tight. Pressure 
can be adjusted by tightening or loosen- 
ing the screw. 

After all metal parts have been 
smoothed up with very fine emery cloth 
and mounting holes and a hole for ce- 
ment bottle drilled in the base, the 
splicer is complete, and here's how you 
use it: 

Place each successive piece of film 
to be spliced on the left pins and cut 
off clean. Then take piece of file which 
is the emulsion scraper and, with 
straight even strokes, remove the emul- 
sion from the exposed frame of film. 
Lift the hasp and move the film to the 
left one frame and finish removing any 
emulsion or burr that may be left. Place 
the film to be spliced onto the right 




A third of 
century ago 

bought and sold 35mm. 

jobs. . . . I'm still at it, although I do most 
of my nefarious work with 16 and 8mm. sizes. So 
send me what you've got and get a quotation 
that will shock you — I'm that generous. 

Charles Bass 

PRESIDENT 

I'm always in the market for all kinds of 8 and 
16mm. cameras and projectors . . . also do a 
bit of intensive dabbling in S. O. F. 

FILMO - MOVIKON - REVERE 
BOLEX - CINE KODAK SPECIALS 

Write Dept. HM 



'[)l2&> } //0M£ MOW FAN 



Get this FREE BOOK! Every 
Movie fan should have it. Chuck 
full with choicest bargains you 
ever saw. Daylight Leading Movie 
film as low as $1 per roll, pro- 
cessing included. Also bulk film, 
and dozens of bargains in acces- 
sories, screens, reels, titters, etc. 
Contains BIG NEW LIST IG6 film subjects, glam- 
our films, cartoons, westerns, historical, adven- 
ture ana sports films for 8mm. and 16mm. Write 
today. Vour name on postcard brings this handy 
book by return mail FPEE: 

ESSCO FILM PRODUCTS 
3827 Archer Ave. Dept. H-3 Chicago 




10PHOTOS25 e 

* VoF GHOST TOWN **** 

MOST UNIQUE SPOT IN SO. CALIFORNIA 

GHOST TOWN 'PITCHUR GALLERY' 
LOCATED AT KNOTT*' BERRY PLACI 
•UENA PARK. CALIFORNIA 



PB MOVIE FILTER KIT FOR COLORFILM 

for reverie CA ^ ERAS 

Including I Screw-in-Sunshade, I Haze Filter, 
I Type A Filter, I Pouch, 7C 

complete **t./ J 

From All Leading Camera Dealer! or 

PONDER & BEST 

1015 SO. GRAND AVE., LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 



Kodachrome 



MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 
GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A Merchandise Mart. Chicago 



Complete Rental Library 

16mm. — Low Rates — 8mm. 

Send 10 Cents for NEW Catalogue 

BIGGER THAN EVER 

NATIONAL CINEMA SERVICE 



71 Dey St.. New York 



WOrth 2-6049 




tYourOwn 

Film Titles 

Photo titles, stationery, greeting 
cards, bookplates, advertising'. 
Eur rales furnished. Junior 
Outfits 18.26 op. Senior $17 ap. 
Print for Others, Big Profits. Sold 
direct from factory only. Write for 
free catalog- and all details. Kelsey 
Pr»»«e», W-94, Merlden, Conn. 



PACE 92 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



FOR ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS! 

★ Harrison CINE KIT 




4 FILTERS and DUAL-SNAP SHADE TO MEET 
ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS — both Kodachrom* 

and Black and White. 

The new Harrison CINEKIT contains a special Aero 
Lock Ring, a Dual-Soap Aluminum Sunshade, and the 
following de luxe Durallne Fillers: YL-8, tY-4, 
RD-4, and GR-4. Case Is of durable 5-oz. Elkhlde. 

felt lined. $6.95 and up. 



(If desired, Kodachrome users 
may substitute a C-4 and 
HAZE filter for an; two of 

the above. 



Write for Free 
llustrated Feltfa 
Today 



HARRISON & HARRISON 

OPTICAL ENGINEERS 
8351 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



WORLD'S 
GREATEST SHOW 
RENTAL LIBRARY 

NOW! You can see all of latest WAR 
and CURRENT EVENTS released by 
CASTLE and other producers, with 
our new ECONOMICAL RENTAL 
PLAN. Write for details. 

KENWOOD FILMS 

818 E. 47th St. Chicago, III. 



:: ES KODACHROME 8 - 8 

"SOARING SEA-GULLS": 12% ft., $2; 25 ft.. 
$3.75; and 40 ft., $6. Gracefulness personified! 
• GOLDEN-MANTLED GROUND SQUIRREL": 50 
ft., $7.50. "ROBIN'S NEST" : 34 ft., $5. "THE 
END," titles: 3 for $1; with fade-out, 50c each. 
Other subjects: Tosemite; The Blooming Desert; San 
Francisco; The Canadian Rockies; Wildf lowers: at 
rate of 18c per foot — any length. 

(Write for Information on SLIDES) 
GUY D. HASELTON 
7936 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood 



Notice to Movie Fans 

If yuu take movies (8mm or 16mm) you simply cannot 
afford to be without a Free copy of the latest Photo Bar- 
gain Book now being distributed throughout the U. S. 
Lists all the best moving picture equipment from all 
the leading manufacturers, describes them. The prices 
save you money in many cases. You'll find the latest 
in lenses, screens, meters, projectors, cameras, film, 
titlei-s, editing outfits, tripods, books on editing, 
titling, etc. This Bargain Book is invaluable to you as 
an equipment REFERENCE book. Don't wait a day 
longer to send for your Free copy. Write us now. 

CENTRAL CAMERA COMPANY 
230 S. Wabash Dep. C-9 Chicago, Illinois 




Why It Pays To 

LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY NOW 

Never so many job and career opportuni- 
ties! Photographers needed in business, 
industry, science. N.Y.I, graduates win- 
ning promotion, higher pay In Armed 
Forces. Qualify at America's largest, old- 
est school. Resident or home study. 
FREE catalog describes commercial, por- 
trait, motion picture and color courses. 
Write today! Dept. 114 

N. Y. Institute of Photography, IOW.31St. New York. N.Y. 



pins, cut it off clean and lap it over the 
scraped frame. 

Raise up top film with the orange 
stick or rod while applying the cement 
to scraped area of film beneath. Lower 
hasp and apply pressure for about 10 
seconds. The result will be a neat, flat 
splice that is stronger than any other- 
wise made and one that will pass 
through any projector gate smoothly 
and unnoticed on the screen. 

16mm Camera 
and Recorder . . . 

• Continued from Page So 

characteristics on the high frequency 
end in order to give constant amplitude. 
Also, the crystal type can be operated 
with a much smaller amplifier. 

A unique feature of this recorder is 
its ability to serve as a film phonograph 
for playing film sound tracks. This was 
achieved by making the sound drum, 
shown in Fig. 3, narrower than the film 
which leaves the sound track area of 
the film in the clear as it rides over the 
drum. A small mirror, attached to re- 
corder door at right angles (not shown 
in photo) extends into the drum behind 
the film and reflects light or the sound 
track image through a hole in the door 
and onto a photo electric cell. Thus, by 
tilting the galvanometer so the slit is 
illuminated clear across, the recorder 
can be used as a film phonograph, or the 
photo electric cell can be used for moni- 
toring purposes during recording pro- 
vided the film base is clear. 

Motor used for driving the recorder 
was taken from an old Facsimile scan- 
ner and is a single phase sync job fitted 
with a 10 to 1 reduction gear obtained 
from an old electric fan oscillating me- 
chanism. This provides the required 180 
RPM's for the feed sprocket at 24 
frames per second. 

Referring again to photos of the re- 
corder, Fig. 2 shows the completely as- 
sembled recorder. The film feed mech- 
anism consists of the chassis, sprockets 
and rollers of an old Q.R.S.-DeVry cine 
camera. Sprocket teeth on one side of 
the gears were removed in order to ac- 
commodate sound film by turning them 
down in a lathe. Original camera lens 
was used in optical system shown at 
lower-right in photo. 

Figure 3 is a closeup showing light 
source and the ammeter for checking 
correct exposure; optical tube contain- 
ing condensing lens; image mask and 
objective lens ; the magnetic galvano- 
meter mounted in operating position; 
and the slit tube and photographing 
objective in its focusing ring. The crys- 
tal galvanometer, interchangeable with 
the magnetic, is shown demounted in 
the immediate foreground. 



Fig. 4 shows the compact optical sys- 
tem, light source, and galvanometer 
mounted in an old hand-crank model- 
Pathex cine camera case. It can be used 
with any film feed mechanism or 
mounted on a camera for single system 
sound. It requires a somewhat complex 
condenser lens as only a % amp. 4 volt 
Bell & Howell sound projector exciter 
lamp is used. There is also a prism ar- 
rangement which enabled the outfit to 
be so constructed as fit it into very 
small space. At upper left in picture is 
lamp. Next is condensing lens and mask. 
The prism is in upper right corner. Below 
prism is lens from old Pathex camera, 
and just below this, the vibrating mir- 
ror, mounting and galvanometer. Pro- 
truding through case at left, (bottom) 
is the slit tube with condenser, focusing 
sleeve and objective. The four-inch ruler 
was included in photo to illustrate com- 
parative size of unit. 

We hope at a later date, when unlim- 
ited materials are again available for 
experimental purposes, to place before 
Home Movies' readers complete plans 
and technical data necessary for con- 
structing a similar recorder. If the sam- 
ple film produced on this recorder for 
Home Movies' editors is any criterion, 
an amateur with similar equipment can 
produce sound films equaling the aver- 
age 1 6mm. sound recording of today. 

Positive v*. 

J^ever^al . . . 

• Continued from Page Si 

such as a waving spotlight beam, mov- 
ing shadows of some objects out of 
scene, etc., they cannot be produced as 
effectively, if at all, with the direct- 
positive system of making titles. Nor is 
it possible to obtain the same pleasing 
three-dimensional effects with block ti- 
tling letters as when reversal film is 
used. 

It might be said that the chief ad- 
vantage of the direct-positive method 
of titling is to provide titles as cheaply 
as possible where the number of titles 
in a picture is quite large, or to pro- 
vide a series of titles quickly where time 
does not permit the now greater delay 
involved in laboratory processing. Sub- 
titles or descriptive titles, as they are 
often termed, need not be fancy in back- 
ground or lettering arrangement and 
for this reason the simple direct-positive 
system is quite satisfactory for making 
this type of title. Where such titles are 
intended as captions for color film, they 
may easily be tinted or toned one of 
several colors to harmonize with sub- 
ject matter of the film. 

This leaves only the main and credit 
titles to be filmed with icversal. These 
titles usually require some decoration, 
are often composed of plastic block let- 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



PACE 93 



ters and, in the case of Kodachrome, 
th«re's usually several colors in the title 
card, all of which require the use of 
black and white or color reversal film 
to reproduce them effectively. In other 
words, it is becoming more and more 
a regular practice to shoot the lead and 
end titles elaborately and the sub-titles, 
if there are a great number of them, in 
the simpler, less expensive direct-posi- 
tive method. 

As to the filming technique required 
for either type film, the same titler, the 
same photoflood lights and the same 
method of determining exposure will 
apply to both. Only in one respect will 
the novice at titling have a tendency to 
lean toward a continued use of positive 
and that is because of the opportunity 
positive affords to shoot a short test 
strip for exposure that the amateur may 
quickly develop himself. Otherwise, he 
may arrive at something like normal ex- 
posure only after considerable trial and 
error. 

In summarizing we might say that if 
your film requires but a few titles and 
you have ample reversal film with which 
to film them, then follow the reversal 
film method. On the other hand if you 
have considerable material to be titled, 
or have produced a picture of substan- 
tial size requiring a large number of ti- 
tles, then you will probably find the 
use of positive film less expensive for 
the job. And if the film to be titled is 
Kodachrome, you can tint the black and 
white positive titles with little trouble 
and at an expenditure of but a few cents. 



3iL 



m 



eview& 



• Continued from Page 70 

U Hot Dog," a fifty-foot 8mm. Koda- 
chrome picture, is probably Thornber- 
ry 's first effort at producing a continu- 
ity. There's not a great deal in the com- 
edy plot to recommend it, but the skill 
with which it was photographed, edit- 
ed and titled deserved the 2 -Star merit 
leader awarded it. As with the other 
two films, Mr. and Mrs. Thornberry are 
the stars, wi#h their pet Dachshund the 
sole supporting actor. 

Thornberry depicts a wacky husband 
bent on making a hot dog sandwich of 
the Dachshund. Armed with a bottle 
of catsup, a loaf of bread and a carving 
knife, the husband lays in wait for the 
dog in the shrubbery near the house. 
Presently the wife turns the dog loose 
on the front lawn for a romp and as 
she re-enters the house, the husband 
pounces upon the dog, slices the loaf of 
bread lengthwise and thrusts the dog 
between the slices as one might a frank- 
furter. Just as he's about to bite into 



the huge sandwich his wife reappears 
with the dog's lunch. The dog yelps, at- 
tracting her attention, and the fright- 
ened husband releases the mut who 
scampers to his mistress' arms. 

In spite of the inane story, it never- 
theless provokes many genuine laughs 
Its doubtless more entertaining than 
would be a series of simple, random shots 
of the dog, Thornberry and his wife. 

3{ you want a 
film to *kow • • • 

• Continued from Page 72 

ing hero that puts to flight the villain 
Peg-Leg Pete who attempts to kidnap 
Minnie Mouse. The climactic battle on 
the edge of a cliff is a highlight of the 
picture. Subject is available in 200 feet 
1 6mm. black and white silent at $6.00, 
and the equivalent footage in 8mm. at 
$3.00. Readers are invited to write for 
free illustrated catalogues. 



CL 



tne 

Workshop . . . 

• Continued from Page S5 

spindle, revealing the rim-drive mechan- 
ism beneath. Removing the screw B 
from end of motor shaft, I next slipped 
off the collar A which contacts rim of 
the idler wheel. This decreases diameter 
of the motor shaft driving the idler, 
thus reducing its speed. The turntable 
speed is decreased proportionately. 

The slower speed has not affected 
quality of my recordings nor did the 
alteration impair the recorder for normal 
use. The small parts removed may quick- 
ly be replaced. — /. F. Stuard, Old Hick- 
ory, Tenn. 



PATRONIZE YOUR DEALER 

Even though you may not make 
as many trip* to your local camera 
store for film these days, remember 
that these stores now carry many 
other items not previously on sale 
there in which you may be inter- 
ested. 

Nearly every camera store, in or- 
der to survive the war and be on 
hand to serve you when victory's 
won, has had to take on additional 
and foreign lines of merchandise 
such as playing cards, games, leath- 
er goods, globes and illuminated 
maps, etc. 

Remember this when in need of 
such merchandise. Patronize your 
photo dealer, the man who guided 
you in starting your home movie 
hobby, so that he may continue to 
serve and advise you with your prob- 
lems as in the past. 




Hollywood Sepia 

ESO-C 

Our most popular M0NOC0LOR 8mm. 
emulsion for all double 8mm. and Uni- 
vex 8mm. cameras. Prices quoted below include spooline 
and proeessinc without additional charge. Processed and 
slit ready for projection under license by the Eastman 
Kodak Company. 

ESO-C — Sepia ortho film for home movies in the popular 
sepia currently used in many Hollywood productions. 
Projects as an attractive, warm amber. An excellent 
supplement for your Kodachrome movies. $1.30 per 
spool. $3.70 per three spools. 
ESO-F — DuPont super-speed film, for dark exteriors and 
Interiors when artificial floods are used. Three times 
as "fast" as our ESO-B outdoor film. $1.75 per spool. 
$4.90 per three spools. 
ESO-A ortho at $1.20: ESO-B super-ortho at $1.36; 
ESO-D Azure at $1.30 and ESO-G Scarlet at $1.25 are 
also available and fully described in our Spring catalog. 
Write for particulars. Short subject films, accessories 
and titling service are included. 
OUR GUARANTEE: ESO-S PICTURES unconditionally 
guarantee these 8mm. films and will replace any film 
purchased or refund the full purchase price if you are not 
fully pleased with your results. You MUST be satisfied' 
AT YOUR DEALER'S OR BY DIRECT MAIL. 

ESO-S PICTURES 

"QUALITY 8MM. SERVICE" 
3945 Central Street Kansas City, Missouri 



8 ENLARGED -| f\ 
TO 16 



REDUCED 

TO 



8 



BLACK AND WHITE AND KODACHROME 

CEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A MERCHANDISE MART 
CHICAGO 



For Your Son or Daughter 



HOLLYWOOD STARS 

autographed photos 



S" x7" (suitable for framing) 

Clark Gable, Roy Rogers, Gary Cooper, Joan Fon- 
taine, Bing Crosby, Rita Hayworth, Charles Boyer, 
Humphrey Bogart, Joe E. Brown, John Boxles, Jack 
Carson, Lana Turner, Linda Darnell, Bill Elliott, Errol 
Flynn, Cary Grant, William Holden, Louis Hayword, 
Bob Hope, Arthur Lake, Joan Leslie, Robert Mont- 
gomery, Edward O'Brien, Tyrone Power, Mickey 
Rooney, Tex Ritter, Rosalind Russell, Larry Simms, 
Randolph Scott, Charles Starrett, Sally Wadsworth, 
Loretta Young. 

25c apiece — 5 for $1.00 

HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 

6408 Selma Hollywood, Calif. 



BACK ISSUES 



Why miss interesting reading and 
facts on the movie hobby? Each and 
every issue is packed full of sugges- 
tions, ideas and cine gadgets. A lim- 
ited number of the following issues 
still available. 

1940 — May, Oct., Nov. and Dec. 

1941 — Mar., April, May, June, July, 
Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and 
Dec. 

1942 — All except Feb. and April. 

1943 — Jan. and Feb. 

25c Each 

Any 12 for $2.00 (postpaid) 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



PAGE 94 



HOME MOVIES FOR MARCH 



CLASSIFIED 



itMERTISIIG 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: It is true what they say about Bass— 
we have equipment. 

USED 8MM. CAMERAS 
Revere Model 88. F:3.5 lens and case, $35.00. 
Revere Turret Model 99 with F:2.5 fixed focus and 
l'/ 2 " Teletar Tele, with case. $82.50. 

USED I6MM. CAMERAS 
Keystone Model A-3 with F:3.5 lens. $31.50. 
Kevstone Model A-7, I" F:2.7 fixed focus lens, 
$39.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70A Cooke F:3.5 lens and 
case, $47.50. 

Victor 3 Turret, with F:3.5 lens focusing mount, 
$67.50. 

Special DeVry, three speed, tubular parallax finder, 
hand crank and spring motor, with 15mm. Wol- 
lensak fixed focus F:2.7" Graf F:l.5 and 3" Tele- 
tar F:4.5, in deluxe carrying case, $115.00. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70E. four speed, I" Berthiot 
F : 1 .9 focusing mount and case, $125.00. 

Victor Model 3 Turret, 15mm. Wollensak fixed focus 
F:2.7, I" Wollensak F:2.7, 2" Wollensak F:3.5 and 
case. $125.00. 

Victor Model 5. critical focuser, with I" Cooke F:3.5 
fixed focus. I" Wollensak F:l.5 focusing mount, 
3" Berthiot Tele F:3.5 and case, $157.50. 

Filmo 70DA, 15mm. wide angle F:2.7 fixed focus. 
I" F:3.5 focusing, 3" Victor F:3.5 Tele, with hand 
crank, $239.50. 

Filmo 70DA, brown finish, frame counter, hand crank 
and 110 volt motor, with 17mm. F:2.7, I" F: 1 .5 
Wollensak lenses and 2" Acura F:2.8, $405. 00. 
LENSES 

hard-to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focal lengths up 
to 4" including Cooke, Hugo Meyer, Dallmeyer 
and complete stock of new Wollensak lenses from 
wide angle to 6". Write for quotations. 
USED I6MM. PROJECTORS 

Keystone E-75, 500 watt lamp. case. $55.00. 

Bell & Howell Model 57. 400 watt lamp and case, 
$67.50. 

Keystone Model A-81, 750 watt lamp, case, $75.00. 
Kodascope 14-10, 750 watt lamp, F:l.4 lens case, 
$102.00. 

Ampro NC silent, convertible to sound, 750 watt 

lamp and case. $195.00. 
Bolex combination 8mm. and 14mm., 750 watt lamp. 

with 8 and 14mm. lenses and all fittings, case, 

$235.00. 

DESIRABLE ACCESSORIES 
Bell & Howell Character Title Writer, latest model, 

with case, $25.00: old model $15.00. 
Universal Titlers, made of aluminum, complete with 

magnifyinq lens, models for all standard cameras, 

8mm. or 16mm., each $4.95. 
Cinematographer's Handbook and Reference Guide 

in stock, $3.50. 
American Photographic Exposure Computer, $1.00. 
The Camera Photo Pocket Guide. $1.00. 
We buy 'em, sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 

stocks of new Cine Equipment, all makes. Send for 

8ass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment up 

to date. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY, Dept. HC, 179 W. 
Madison St., Chicago. III. 

• CRAFT-O-MATIC 35mm. slide projector. Maga- 
zine holds 54 readymounts. Automatic changing or 
remote control. 500 watt (800 hour) lamp. 4- and 
4-inch lenses. Two extra magazines, each with 54 
hclders. Extra lamp. Extra timing cam. List $339.50. 
Condition as new. Sacrifice $250.00. GORDON B. 
7PI LERS, 3249 Fairmount Blvd.. Cleveland Heights. 
Ohio. 

• I4MM. SILENT PROJECTOR— 750 watt Standard 
Projector with following features: 2" color-corrected 
lens, motor rewind, runs backward or forward, 
rheostat speed control, pilot light, removable film 
gate and easy-tilt control. Price $75.00. BOX 333. 
Home Movies Magazine, 4040 Sunset Blvd.. Holly- 
wood. Calif. 

• SOUND and SILENT films, cameras, projectors 
and accessories exchanged, bought, sold, rented. 
Bargain list free. HARVEY IRIS. Box 539, Brockton, 
Mass. 

WANTED 

• 8MM. AND I4MM. sound and silent subjects, 
projectors, cameras, lenses. Ship them to us and 
*e will mail check— highest prices. HOLMES MOV- 
I EE FOR HOMES— Coast to Coast. Write to 3594 
Main St.. Riverside, Calif. 

• WANTED — Late model Cine Special, I" f/1.9 
lens, telephoto wide angle lens, case, extra mag- 
azine or other accessories. Answer full details. 
Cash. A. R. CARUCCI. 422 E. 4th St., Wilmington, 
Del. Phone 4-7404. 



• Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 

Turn it into cash with a Home Movies 
classified adl 

RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing date, 
10th of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



FILM RELEASES 



WANTED 



• SPOT CASH WAITING! 14mm. sound projectors. 
ROLLEIFLEX CAMERAS. Cine Special (camera and 
lenses). MOGULL'S, 55 West 48th, New York. 

• BELL & HOWELL Diplomat projector, late mod- 
el, must be perfect. Give serial number. R. C. 
FRIEDMAN, 5715 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

• VIEWFINDER objectives for 14mm. Bell & Howell 
as follows: 15mm. 4". 4", also 15mm. Foe. lens. 
CECIL WALTERS. 1927 West Monte Vista, Phoenix. 
Ariz. 

• WANTED — used equipment. Bargain list on 
request. PETERS, 4 1 - B So. 4th St.. Allentown, Penna. 



HELP WANTED 



DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER 

wanted with practical experience in 8 and 16mm. 
cameras and projectors. Permanent employment 
with large Chicago manufacturer now engaged in 
100'' war work, with assured post war production. 
Excellent opportunity and substantial salary for 
right man. In first letter give age, experience, edu- 
cation, present employment and other qualifications. 
All correspondence held in strictest confidence. Our 
organization knows of this ad. Box 334. Home 
Movies. 4040 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



FILM RELEASES 



• 8 AND I4MM. Film Subjects— black and white 
color — sound or silent. Largest selection ever com- 
piled, 45c to $200.00. Write for new, DeLuxe cata- 
log, profusely illustrated, 25c (coin or stamps) — 
refunded first purchase. HOLLYWOOD MOVIE 
SUPPLY CO., Box 870, Hollywood, Calif. 

• EXCHANGE your 14mm. full subjects used or 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm. -14mm. subjects, 
cartoons, comedies. ABBE, 1245 Broadway, N. Y. C. 

• MONEYMAKER! "The World's Greatest Passion 
Play." 14mm. and 35mm. Specify sound or silent. 
Rent or purchase. Superior than Oberammergau- 
play. HEMENWAY FILM CO.. 33-A Melrose St.. 
Boston, Mass. 

• 8-I4MM. SILENT and sound films. Cameras and 
projectors. Bought, sold, traded. Free Lists, BOBS. 
154 East 47th St., N. Y. C. 

• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged, bought 
sold, rented. Bargains always. New Free lists. 
FRANK LANE, 5 Little Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

e SALE — Rental — Exchange: Latest film releases. All 
purchases guaranteed. Send stamp for free cata- 
logues. BAILEY FILMS, 1651 Cosmo, Hollywood. 
Calif. 

• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New-used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins. REIDEL FILMS, 
Dept. HM-343. 3207 Joslyn Rd., Cleveland, Ohio. 

• 8-I4MM. silent and sound musicals. Lists free. 
Color sample, dime. Low rental rates. WARRING- 
TON, 1418 Knecht Ave., Halethorpe, Md. 

• EXCHANGE, rent, and sale — 14mm. sound and 
silent, 8mm. films. Send 10c for Victory Bulletin 
and 25c for complete descriptive catalogue. NU-ART 
FILMS. INC., 145 W. 45th St., New York. 



• 8MM.-I4MM. sound and silent films, projectors 
and cameras — bought, sold and exchanged. Trades 
oi terms accepted. Free bargain bulletin. ZENITH, 
30B West 44th. New York. 



• COMPLETE 14mm. sound subjects, perfect. $5.75. 
Odd sound reels, $2.00. All sizes film bought, sold, 
exchanged. Catalogues, sample film, 10c. INTER- 
NATIONAL, 2120 Staruss, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

• 8MM subjects 50c, exchange 25c. 16mm. subjects. 
$1.00. exchange. 25c. Sound film, latest musicals, 
$9.00 up. Exchange. $1.00. Cameras and projectors, 
lowest Drices. HOLMES — "Movies for Homes" Coast 
To Coast Service. 3596 Main St., Riverside, Calif. 
2940 No. Camac St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

• LARGE, new 1943 Sale-Exchange list. Many 
814mm. bargains. Photograph, list 10c. GARY 
FILMS, 369 East 55th, Brooklyn, New York. 



• 100 ft. 16mm. used sound films, $1.00 postpaid. 
BLACKHAWK FILMS, Dept. HM-3. Davenport, 
Iowa. 



e 8MM. FILMS — major producers. New rental club 
plan. ARTCRAFT FILM LIBRARY, P. O. Box 385. 

Akron, Ohio . 

KODACHROME FILM RELEASES 

• KODACHROME Travel Films— latest releases 

now available for distribution in 8 and 16mm. Dime 
will bring color sample and listings. KENWOOD 
FILMS. 818 E. 47th St.. Chicago, III. 

• KODACHROME movies for grownups. Lists, sam- 
ple, 10c or a projection length scene from Wakiki 
hula, $1.00. Specify 8mm. or 16mm. JENKINS. 392, 

Elmira, N. Y. 

FILMS FOR EXCHANGE 

• EXCHANGE: silent pictures. $1.00 reel; sound, 
$2.00. Also sell. Free catalogue. Selected sound 
programs, reasonable rentals. BETTER FILMS, 742 
New Lots Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FILM 



e HALF-a-dozen rolls of Univex single 8mm. film 
(New ESO-B) for $2.00. postpaid. Particulars or 
cash-with-order will bring film by return mail. Film 
ready for dalite loading in camera. ESO-S, 3945 
Central, Kansas City, Mo. 

PROCESSING SERVICE 

e MOTION picture processing. 100' 16mm., 75c; 
50 16mm., 50c; 25' 8/8mm., 35c; 25' 8mm., 25c: 
RITTER FILM SERVICE, 629 Lyman Ave., Oak 

Park. III. 

DUPLICATING SERVICE 

• $1.25 PAYS for a fifty-foot 8mm. duplicate of 
your favorite reel. Our Monocolor duplicates will 
preserve those fading Kodachrome movies. Partic- 
ulars. ESO-S PICTURES, 3945 Central, Kansas City, 
Missouri. 



TITLING 



• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit — Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16", 18", 20" 24", 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal for 
general close-up photography. Complete kit $3.00. 
Separate lenses, 60c each. Also available in 6". 8" 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra-closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO.. 3221 So. 
Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

• TITLE your own films. This complete, illustrated 
book tells how. Shows how to build your own titler; 
how to develop positive titles; how to make trick 
titles, etc. Title lettering and composition explained. 
Replete with charts and tables on diopters, field 
areas, etc. Send $1.00 today for HOW TO TITLE 
HOME MOVIES, written by George Cushman. VER 
HALEN PUBLICATIONS, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



• STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have a model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
printed in authentic legal manner, 50 for 25c (coin) 
postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATI IONS. 6060 Sunset 
Blvd.. Hollywood, Calif. 



Big News For Movie Amateurs! 



Two New Booklets 
full of Filming Ideas! 



If your problem is lack of filming ideas these two 
booklet's will supply what you need! They're packed 
with practical home movie plots that are easy to shoot 
and certain to make your movies more entertaining. 





Anyone can make movies of kiddies, but how many start 
filming with any idea of interesting continuity? Here's a new 
book filled with filming ideas for children's movies, pub- 
lished at the request of thousands of HOME MOVIES' readers 
who recognize a need for such helpful service. Don't shoot 
another foot of film until you've read this book — gotten an 
idea that'll make your children's movies the talk of the 
town! Its complete, too, with several zrt main titles. 
Only 25c, postpaid. 



If you're plotting a movie of your 
vacation, or want to heighten in- 
terest in last year's vacation film 
with a good running gag, this 
booklet offers 50 fresh profession- 
ally conceived filming ideas that 
any amateur can use. Replete with 
interesting and humorous contin- 
uity plots, ideas for running gags, 
plus several timely art Vacation 
titles, its a lot of value for only 25c. 



Order ,41 I) W ! 



...use this coupon 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Blvd.. Hollywood, Calif. 
Gentlemen : 

Enclosed ploase find cents for which please send 

postpaid copies of "50 Ideas for Vacation Films" 

and copies of "50 Ideas for Filming Children." 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 




NOW YOU SEE IT. Before the camouflage experts went to 
work, this factory — a model, for test purposes— was photo- 
graphed from the air on conventional panchromatic film. 
The bomber's eye would see what you see— a perfect set-up 
for destruction. 



NOW YOU DON'T. With camouflage materials — false struc- 
tures, netting, cloth streamers, paint, and artificial trees — 
the experts have fooled the camera, and the bombardier. 
To the aerial camera loaded with panchromatic film, even 
the marks of erosion on the slope by the railroad track have 
disappeared. 




Infrared Film 
spots the "make lelieve" 
of enemy camouflage 



G 



CAMOUFLAGE is the highly developed art of pulling the wool over an 
enemy's eyes ... an art which is finding old methods ineffectual, in 
this war. 

This is in a measure due to Kodak's development of a type of film 
whose vision goes far beyond that of the human eye. 

Natural grass and foliage contain chlorophyll — Nature's coloring 
matter. Camouflage materials lack this living substance. Chlorophyll 
reflects invisible infrared light rays — and Kodak Infrared Film regis- 
ters this invisible light, making the natural areas look light in the 
picture — almost white. In violent contrast, the "dead" camouflaged 
areas show up dark — almost black — in the picture. 

Moreover, Infrared Film is able to penetrate through the haze of a 
"low-visibility" day, and return from a reconnaissance flight with 
pictures in clear detail. Here again it far exceeds the power of the 
human eye. 

• • • 

Working with our Army and Navy flyers and technicians, Kodak has 
carried this new technique of camouflage detection to high efficiency— 
and has, for our own use, helped develop camouflage which defies 
detection . . . Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y. 




BUT HERE IT IS AGAIN. With Kodak Infrared Film in the 
aerial cameras, pictures like this are brought back from 
an observation flight. On Infrared pictures, the false, 
"dead" camouflage materials look almost black. The 
natural landscape is unnaturally light. A trained camera- 
man, with one look, knows where the bombs should strike. 



Serving human progress through Photography 





"Dick" Whittington 




APRIL . 1943 

LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY AMATEUR MOVIE MAGAZINE! 




★ 



LAUGh 
FILMS 



in 



8mm 



and 



16mm 



* 



DONALD DUCK CARTOON FILMS 



THE same Donald Duck you see regularly 
on theatre screens now entertains you on 
your home movie screen. Walt Disney's top 
star is featured in more than 30 different 
animated cartoon subjects available for 

RUNNING TIME 4 MINUTES 

Donald in Red Hot Bullets 1553-A 

Donald's Buzz Saw Battle 1 554-A 

Donald in The Smoke Eater 1 555-A 

Donald in The Rescue 1 556-A 

Donald's Trained Seals 1 557-A 

Donald in Off Balance 1 558-A 

Donald's Ice Capers 1 559- A 

100 Ft. 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. 8mm 1.50 



both 8mm. and 16mm. projectors. Spice 
up your home movie programs! Show Donald 
Duck Tonight! Your local photographic 
dealer can supply you or order direct from 
this select list: 

RUNNING TIME 8 MINUTES 

Donald Duck in Super Service 1 45 1 - B 

Donald Duck in Fast and Furious 1452-B 

Donald Duck in The Firemen 1 453 -B 

Donald Duck's Day Off 1454-B 

Donald in The Flying Trapeze 1455-B 

Donald The Skater 1456-B 

Donald's Mexican Romance 1457-B 

200 Ft. 16mm $6.00 

100 Ft. 8mm 3.00 



HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES 



i 



'A / a r i iktr> r t n ai n i?w a n r\ 



WRITE 
FOR 



ADVISORY EDITORS 



DR. A. K. BAUMGARDNER 

Peoria Cinema Club 

PETER BEZEK 

Chicago Cinema Club 

S. JAMES 6 1 ALSO N 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Louts 

!. MOSS BROWN 

Dallas Cinema Club 

YALTER BRACKEN 

The 8-14 Movie Club. Philadelphia. Pa. 

V. EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographers 

USSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema Club 

YRIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Club 

RTHUR E. CIBBS 

Portland Cine Club 

vt A. HOOK 

Seattle 8mm. Club 

'.FRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Club 

:. NESTELL 

Cinemen Club 

RCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

BERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 

THEO. ROTH 

Sherman Clay Movie Club 

I. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm. Movte Club 

tUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

\ > E. SNYDER 

Des Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 

IH . SISSEL 

I Austin Movie Club 

I r IS 0. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 



I as Second-Class Matter, May 6, 1938. at 
|e jtoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 

I Act of March 3, 1877. 
ition rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
25c. Advertising rate* on application. 



. home 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Copyrighted 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen Publications, 
publishers of Home Movies, Photographic Dealer, and Hollywood 
Motion Picture Review. No part of contents may be reprinted 
without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR APRIL, 1943 

THE READER SPEAKS IOO 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS loz 

PLANNING A BIRTHDAY FILM By Paill Wilk'tlU, Jr 105 

PRACTICE PROJECT FOR APRII io 6 

MOVIE OF THE MONTH By J. H. Sc/jOCtt 107 

AMATEUR ANIMATION IN HOME MOVIE TITLES 

— By George W. Cushman 108 

EASTERN AMATEURS FILM WESTERN THRILLER 

— By Curtis Randall 1 1 o 

BACK-WIND AND FRAME-COUNTER FOR THE MODEL "V 

— By Arthur M. Sharp 1 1 1 

continuity ideas in odd shots — By Warren Garin m 

control time with variable camera speed — By Porter Blair ... 113 

THE EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP- 114 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW t l £ 

Hollywood notebook — By Warren Garin up 

titles — By Edmund Turner iZ y 



APRIL 



CHAS. J. Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. J. Ver HALEN, JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 
6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
Everett Gellert, 62 West 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 




NUMBER 4 
VOLUME X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. CAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORCE W. CUSHMAN 
J. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S MACAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 



PAGE 100 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



★ 

★ ★ 




★ ★ 
★ 



Qoesiq, American 

PRECISION 

OPTICS 



rr 



Since 



1899 



BECAUSE OF THEIR 
ACCURACY THEY ARE 
DEPENDED UPON BY 
OUR ARMED FORCES 
ON LAND— ON THE SEA 
— IN THE AIR — 



"GOERZ -AMERICAN 
PHOTO-LENSES 

play an important part in the 
war program and our produc- 
tion is now keyed to fill the 
requirements of our Govern- 
ment. Within limitations we 
may still be able to supply 
Coerz lenses, of certain types 
and sizes, for civilian use. We 
suggest your inquiries through 
your dealer or direct. 



Address 
DEPT. HM-4 



The Reader 



CP. GOERZ AMERICAN OPTICAL CO. 




Office and Factory 
3I7 East 34th Street 



New York 



Home Movies vs. 
Double Features 

/;; a recent issue, Home Movies car- 
ried a special message to readers con- 
cerning the movie industry's practice of 
continuing double features in face of 
the film shortage, with particular em- 
phasis on the reaction it would have on 
the amateur's hobby. Since then, several 
groups, as well as individuals, have writ- 
ten to the editors expressing similar 
i tews and a desire to see the double fea- 
ture in theatre bills quickly abolished. 
Some of these letters follow: 

Sirs: With conditions as they are: pri- 
orities being enforced on many com- 
modities, and the ration of movie film, 
I am writing this letter to you to help 
in an effort to remove the "B" type pic- 
tures and double features that are now 
being made by the professional pro- 
ducers. 

As our hobby has been accepted by 
so many people in all walks of life, we 
must preserve some of the things that 
we like to do when we are not at our 
"breadwinning"' positions. 

Anything you can do or your maga- 
zine can do as a unit to help the ama- 
teur movie fan get more film for his 
hobby will be appreciated — C. S. 
Di orak, Pres., Suburban Amateur Movie 
Club, Beruyn, III. 

Gentlemen: In view of the shortage 
of film from which all movie clubs are 
suffering, we wish to offer protest to 
the continued practice of making "B" 
pictures. 

We, as a club, feel the entertainment 
provided in such films is so mediocre 
that they certainly do not warrant the 
great quantities of film used in produc- 
ing them. Many first class pictures lose 
their attraction when one has to sit 
through lengthy "B" class films in or- 
der to see the picture which has the box 
office appeal. 

We hope this protest will have some 
influence in abolishing such productions. 
— Wenatchee Cine Club, Mrs. Geo. 
Rains, Secy., Wenatchee, Wash'n. 

Sirs: In view of the shortage in film, 
the Carquinez Camera Club feels this 
would be a good time to join the move- 
ment to eliminate production of "B" 
pictures and double features by Holly- 
wood. These second-rate pictures require 
a great deal of film which, if eliminated, 
would release a larger percentage of 



SPEAKS 



film for amateur use. We feel that ama- 
teur photography is very important to 
National morale at this time. — Dora 
Chambers, Secy., Carquinez Camera 
Club, Carquinez, Calif. 

Improved the Idea 

Sirs: I surely enjoyed the article, "Air- 
brushed Designs For Titles" by Russell 
Thorpe in the January issue. So I got 
busy and tried out the idea. It worked 
fine. But I like to make titles in color, 
so I followed the same procedure out- 
lined in the article except that instead 
of using a soft pencil, I used a special 
soft artists' chalk. This chalk is made 
in pieces i"xi"x4" and comes in a va- 
riety of colors. It is softer than the 
chalk used on blackboards, works well 
on soft paper. Perhaps other readers 
would be interested in trying it for col- 
or titles. — Waldeman Kruger, Milwau- 
kee, Wise. 

Filming Service Men 

In the January issue, Milo Jones of- 
fered the suggestion that Reel Fellows 
and other movie amateurs offer to shoot 
movies of men in service to be sent the 
men's parents. Reader Buck likes the 
idea, wants to contact others similarly 
interested: 

Gentlemen: I think Mr. Jones of 
Jacksonville, Fla., has an excellent idea 
in his suggestion printed in Reader 
• Continued on Page 12 $ 



CINETOCRAPHER 

A QUIET but intcnsiie study has been 
carried on by Home Movies' staff dur- 
ing the past scleral months to determine 
a more fitting title for the advanced and 
semi-professional cine photographer. 

The professional motion picture cam- 
eraman has long been known by the 
very appropriate title of Cincmatograph- 
er, a title which often has been misap- 
plied to amateurs. 

Home Movies has suggested the title 
CINETOGRAPHER as best fitting and 
identifying the serious amateur motion 
picture photographer, and the suggestion 
has met with instant and widespread ap- 
proval. 

CINETOGRAPHER it is then, and 
shall be henceforth in these pages. Many 
CINETOGRAPHERS already are using 
this new term of prestige in their credit 
titles, viz: "John J. Jones, Cinetograph- 
er," or "Cinetography by John J. Jones." 

—THE EDITOR. 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PACE 101 



NOW! YOU CAN OWN MOVIES 

YAHKS»ACnON I 




NEW. . . GRIPPING CASTLE FILM 
FOR EVERY 8mm. OR 16mm. 
PROJECTOR OWNER 



First 8mm.— 16mm. pictures of U. S. forces fighting in Africa! Join the 
Yanks as they thunder into battle! Know the sensation of a soldier under 
fire as Stukas swoop towards you from the skies! Man an anti-aircraft gun 
and knock the dive bombers into flaming wreckage! Crouch on a hilltop 
and watch one of the most amazing tank battles ever filmed, with both 
sides in the camera focus! See hidden Nazi gun emplacements blown sky 
high! Ride in a strafing fighter plane as it blasts troops, trucks and tanks! 
Fly out to sea . . . blast an Axis ship with cannon fire and watch it blow up 
right before your eyes! Here is an epic of American intrepidity, gallantry 
and fighting fury that will leave you breathless! Don't wait! Own it now! 



Castle War Films folder describing 
movies of every important battle ac- 
tion of World War II. Check below to 
receive it. Act now! 




ORDER FORM 

Send Castle Films' "BATTLE FOR Tunisia" in the size and 
edition indicated. 

8mm. 16mm. 

□ soft. . . .$1.75 □ ioo ft. . . $2.75 

□ isoft.. . .5.50 □360 ft. . . 8.75 

□ Sound 350 ft. 17.50 



Name- 



Address- 



City. 



State- 



Remittance enclosed □ Ship CCD. □ 

Send Castle Films' FREE War Films Catalog □ h.M. 4 

Copt. 1»43. Castle Films. Inc. 



PACE 102 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



MAKE A 
"DURATION" FILM RECORD 
OF THE FAMILY 

...of Dad as Air Raid Warden 




Use the Craig Junior Combination/ $8.95 

Includes two Craig Junior geared Rewinds, 
Craig 8 mm. and 16 mm. Junior Splicer, bottle 
Crcig Scfety Film Cement, and water container. 
Junior Splicer only $3.95 




Craig Cinetints 

Put life and color into 
your black and white 
film! Easy to use, six 
colors — red, orange, 
purple, blue, amber 
and green. Kit, 53.25 
Colors, each . . . 55c 



Craig Fotofade 

Gives you easy pro- 
fessional fades and 
wipes. Simple instruc- 
tions, each bottle suf- 
ficient for hundreds 
of applications, $1.25 
...with special water- 
proof masking tape. . . 

$1.75 



OTHER CRAIG EQUIPMENT 

Craig master rewinds 2,000 ft. capacity, ad- 
justable brake for tens. on and speed control 
— $6.00 each. Craig Senior rewinds, silent 
operation, with brake and new type locking 
device on sp ndle — $5.00 each. Craig Junior 
rewinds — $2.50 each. Craig Senior combina- 
tion — two Sen or rewinds and Craig Senior 
splicer mounted on 32" board — $21.50. Craig 
Senior splice.- — $10.95. 



Edit your "Duration" 
film record with Craig 
Home Movie Equip- 
ment — See your photo 
dealer NOW! 



REVIEWS... 



of cAmateur film* 



B y 



S C H 0 E N 



Because these film reviews usual- 
ly come in groups of three, several read- 
ers have inquired why a greater number 
of reviews are not printed each month. 
The answer is lack of space. This means 
we review here a selection of two or 
three films which contain production 
faults or highlights that the editors be- 
lieve will prove enlightening to other 
readers. 

These reviews are intended as a spe- 
cial service to the reader, a sort of edu- 
cational feature tend- 
ing to improve the 
average amateur's 
movie making. Ev- 
ery amateur who 
sends in a film for 
analysis and criti- 
cism receives a spe- 
cial written report in 
which good and bad 
points of his film are 
analyzed and sugges- 
tions made for im- 
provement. 

The reviews that 
follow contain help- 
ful pointers for every 
movie maker. 



• EVERY filmer of amateur mov- 
ies, whether a subscriber or not, is 
united to submit his films to the 
editors for renew and helpful criti- 
cism. This free service applies to an) 
type of picture whether it be your 
first moiie or a pretentious photo- 
play effort. Aim of this sen ice is 
to help you make better pictures. 

Renewed films will be rated -, i 
and 3 stars. Those rating i or 3 
stars will receive Free an animated 
leader indicatiie of its merit. Best 
film renewed each month u ill rc- 
ceiie a special certificate award as 
the Moiie of the Month. 

All films are returned promptly 
by insured express together with 
merit leaders and special analysis 
report. 



Desert Gold" is 
a 300 foot 8mm. Ko- 
dachrome photoplay produced by Leon- 
ard Ackerman of North Hollywood, 
Calif. Story concerns a young married 
couple and particularly a husband with 
a penchant for buying rare books much 
to annoyance of his wife. In one of the 
books, the couple find an old treasure 
map which, upon consulting a professor, 
they learn is probably authentic. 

Taking the professor with them, the 
couple go into the hills of California 
in search of the buried treasure. Trip 
takes them through the San Fernando 
Mission and into the scenic Vasquez 
Rocks section of mountainous Southern 
California. 

Stopping at the mission, the party in- 
quires of the mission gardener for di- 
rections, showing him the map. After 
they have gone on their way, gardener 
decides to follow them. 

When the trio finally locate and dig 
up the treasure, the villainous gardner 
is watching them from a distant hill. 



Armed with a pistol, he robs the hus- 
band of the treasure while he is hiking 
back to his car alone and unarmed. 
Meantime, the professor sees gardener es- 
caping with treasure, shoots him down 
and recovers it. 

Back home again, the trio are about 
to divide up treasure when they chance 
upon a newspaper advertisement for 
Defense Bonds. This causes them to 
take the treasure, consisting of gold 
coins, to the postoffice and exchange it 
for a stack of De- 
fense Bonds, and 
these are distributed 
among the lucky 
three. 

Filmer Ackerman 
has contrived a good 
original story in Des- 
ert Gold but it con- 
stantly fails in dra- 
matic emphasis due 
chiefly to inexperi- 
enced camera work. 
Where vivid closeups 
should have been em- 
ployed to heighten 
tempo of an action, 
the procedure con- 
tinued in long shot 
— a predominant 
fault throughout the 
picture. A fine opportunity is afforded 
for dramatic emphasis where the gard- 
ner follows the trio's car up a winding 
mountain road. But the entire sequence 
is shot from one or two camera angles 
and movement of the cars is slow and 
ponderous whereas they should be trav- 
eling fast. 

A little more rehearsal of the cast al- 
so would have improved acting results. 
This is one phase of production which 
many amateurs constantly overlook. 
The very fact that an amateur cast is 
undertaking a dramatic picture is all 
the more reason why unlimited time 
should be given to rehearsal if the re- 
sult is to approach anything like suc- 
cessful screen drama. 

In spite of the shortcomings in this 
production, Ackerman displays a talent 
for good screen story r construction and 
the ability to keep the action moving 
forward logically if somewhat slowly, 

• Continued on Page 124 




CRAIG MOVIE SUPPLY CO. 

Los Angeles San Francisco Seattle 





Thousands of Patriotic Camera Owner 
Are Now Making Movies for Service Met 



Movies that show the men in training camps what their families and 
friends arc doing back home are proving one of the greatest morale 
boosters these men have ever had. "Ifs the next best thing to a fur- 
lough," say many of the boys who have received movie newsreels 
while in training. Facilities for projecting 8mm. and i6mm. film 
are provided at most camps. If they cannot readily be found, the 
nearest Revere dealer will gladly show the films for the men. 

What a wonderful way to share your pleasure in your movie equip- 
ment! Whether you make a film alone, or with fellow movie makers, 
or members of a cinema club, you will have the satisfaction of 
knowing that you are making a worth- while contribution to the war 
effort. And, when your production is completed and delivered, the 
appreciative letters that you will receive will bring yon new thrills 
and greater interest than ever in your hobby. 



Until victory is won, the crafts- 
men who made Revere 8mm. 
Cameras and Projectors are de- 
voting full time to precision- 
built aircraft instruments and 
other war supplies. 





PACE 104 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



Big Hews For Movie Amateurs! 



Two Booklets full 
of lew Filming Ideas! 



If your problem is lack of filming ideas these two 
booklets will supply what you need! They're packed 
with practical home movie plots that are easy to shoot 
and certain to make your movies more entertaining. 



Anyone can make movies of kiddies, but how many start 
filming with any idea of interesting continuity? Here's a new 
book filled with filming ideas for children's movies, pub- 
lished at the request of thousands of HOME MOVIES' readers 
who recognize a need for such helpful service. Don't shoot 
another foot of film until you've read this book — gotten an 
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town! Its complete, too, with several art main titles. 
Only 25c, postpaid. 



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If you're plotting a movie of your 
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any amateur can use. Replete with 
interesting and humorous contin- 
uity plots, ideas for running gags, 
plus several timely art Vacation 
titles, its a lot of value for only 25c. 



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HOME NOV IKS 

Published in Hollywood 
APRIL 1943 



# An important birthday party closeup 
is that of blowing out the candles and 
cutting the cake.. A spotlight or photo- 
flood in a reflector placed low out of 
scene at the left, as in this picture, will 
produce realistic effect of candlelight on 
face of subject. 




Harold M. Lambert 



I 



I OW that movie making is con- 
fined pretty much to shooting pictures 
of family events, many of us, in aban- 
doning our more serious picture making 
ambitions, are finding hitherto untap- 
ped filming possibilities in the everyday 
events that take place in our homes. By 
choosing an occasion, a family event, as 
our picture theme, the natural sequence 
of events automatically presents a sur- 
prisingly good continuity. 

Take birthdays, for instance. Every- 
body has them. And where there are 
children in the family, birthday parties 
are a highlight in the lives of every 
member of the household. If you are 
giving your child a birthday party soon, 
a well sequenced continuity of the 
event can be filmed simply by training 
your camera on the various events as 
they follow in natural order: arrival of 
the little guests, the entertainment, the 
party with ice cream and cake, and 
guests leaving at the close of the party. 

You'll find all the children natural 
actors and actresses if you'll try for un- 
posed shots while they are occupied with 
the festivities. Only when trying for 
specially acted bits of business involv- 
ing several of the children, is trouble 
apt to be encountered. 

A well rounded birthday movie, of 
course, must include some preliminary 
filming such as shots of birthday invi- 
tations, and a closing sequence, of 
which there can be many variations, may 
be filmed at leisure after the party to 
complete continuity. 

Here is a sketchy continuity idea for 
a child's birthday party which may be 
adapted readily to the needs of most 
filmers: 



PUNNING 1 
BIRTHDAY FILM 



B y 



PAUL 



W I L K I N S 



1. Closeup: Tiny hands withdraw- 
ing birthday card from envelope, hold 
it before camera so it may be read. 

2. Med. Closeup of child (one of 
guests) expressing glee at having re- 
ceived invitation. 

3. Repeat this same routine three or 
four times, using other invited guests. 
A pleasing variation is to include the 
mother of one child in a scene and hav- 
ing her assist with opening the invita- 
tion and reading it. Fadeout on the last 
scene of this sequence. 

4. Closeup: Fade in on a calendar 
showing date (of birthday), as an- 
nounced in invitation. If possible, use 
large, single leaf day-by-day calendar. 
Dissolve or fade out and into — 

5. Closeup of clock with hands ap- 
proaching the appointed hour. 

6. Med. Shot — interior, dining room. 
Mother is arranging party favors. Son- 
ny enters scene on way out of doors. Is 
carrying bat and ball. Mother stops him 
and speaks: 

TITLE — "Your party guests will be 
here any minute. Get back in there and 
put on your good clothes!" 

7. Same as previous scene; Sonny re- 
acts to mother's words by frowning and 
pleading permission to go out and play. 



Reluctantly retraces steps to exit from 
scene. 

8. Med. Shot — Sonny's bedroom. He 
enters and throws bat and ball on bed. 
Sits on edge of bed dejectedly. As he 
looks up, sees object out of scene. Hap- 
py expression crosses face. 

9. Med. Closeup — open window in 
Sonny's bedroom. 

10. Back to previous scene. Sonny 
gets up, hesitates a moment as though 
listening for approach of mother. Picks 
up bat and ball and starts to tiptoe out 
of scene. 

1 1 . Med. Shot — interior of Sonny's 
room with camera facing door. Door 
opens suddenly and mother walks in. 
Expresses displeasure as she reacts to 
Sonny's action out of scene. 

12. Med. Shot — Sonny in act of 
climbing out of window and carrying 
ball and bat. Stops abruptly. Looks back 
at mother. 

13. Back to previous scene. Moth- 
er orders Sonny back into room. 

14. Interior of Sonny's room. 
Camera farther back to take in both 
Sonny and Mother in a med. shot. Moth- 
er takes bat and ball and orders Sonny 
to change clothes which is indicated by 

• Continued on Page 122 



105 



PACE 106 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PRACTICE PROJECT for ^u... 



How to tell how much 
footage to allow each scene 
for best picture results 



Inanimate objects in closeup, 2 
3 seconds. 



« below medium closeups with 

action, 5 seconds. 




lAST month we introduced the 
filmless practice project as a skill-per- 
fecting exercise for the beginning ama- 
teur whose movie making activities 
have been cut short by rationing and 
other wartime restrictions. 

As pointed out last month, some of 
the foremost photographers, in the em- 
bryonic stages of their careers, even 
when film was plentiful and the sky was 
the limit as far as subject material was 
concerned, perfected their technique by 
practicing focusing, composition, ex- 
posure, etc., with an empty camera. As 
they practiced setting the lens properly 
for a shot or moving the camera for bet- 
ter composition, they gained the knowl- 
edge that comes only from repetitive 
effort and makes for successful pho- 
tography. 

Of the several pitfalls encountered 
by many beginning movie makers, none 
is more costly in terms of film than the 
practice of allowing too much footage 
to a scene. And to aggravate the situa- 
tion, most of these filmers are reluctant 
to shorten these scenes after projection 
of the film makes the need glaringly 
apparent. As a result, the filmer's whole 
movie making effort suffers. On the 
other hand, there are those amateurs 
with frugal instincts who do not allow 
enough footage to a scene. Both need to 
practice and give more study to this an- 
gle of their hobby which certainly will 
result in bettering their films. 

How long should a movie scene last? 
One can get many different answers to 
this question. Some will say five seconds. 



ground or surroundings. Therefore, long 
shots invariably should remain on the 
screen longer than closeups. 

Look at the illustration on this page. 
It shows three scenes in a sequence from 
a recently produced family film record 
n which a little girl was pictured get- 
ting into mischief in a flower garden. 
Of course, the whole act was carefully 
"staged" by the filmer for the desired 
reaction on the screen. And this reac- 
tion was achieved by carefully timing 
each scene. 

Following a medium shot of the lit- 
tle girl, showing her observing some- 
thing out of scene, the next shot is a 
closeup of a rose — 2 or 3 seconds in 
length. Next shot is a closeup of the 
girl standing beside the rose. She con- 



Another, ten. Actually, there can be 
no hard and fast rule for the simple rea- 
son that no two scenes are alike in sub- 
ject matter, interest, or emotional ele- 
ment. The rule that applies to a dra- 
matic theatrical scene, may not neces- 
sarily apply to an ordinary home movie 
scene of the baby in the garden. In 
tense dramatic action, a scene may meas- 
ure only five or six frames in length. 
But in making a shot of the baby which 
we expect to cherish in repeated screen- 
ings in years to come, we'll want the 
scene sufficiently long so we may linger 
over it, a little fondly perhaps, each 
time its screened. But even such shots as 
these should be judged for screen time 
as they are filmed, lest they be too long 
or too short. 

Another factor which affects scene 
length is the type of shot — long, me- 
dium, or closeup. One grasps the details 
within a tight closeup more readily than 
he does in a long shot in which the cen- 
tral object appears in confusing back- 



templates picking it, then takes hold 
of the stem and starts to tug. This ac- 
tion required just five seconds and the 
scene was made five seconds in length. 
There were no superfluous frames at 
the beginning or after the end of this 
action. 

Next scene is a medium shot which 
takes in the little girl in the foreground 
and shows her mother entering scene 
hurriedly in the background, calling to 
the little girl, who releases her grasp 
on the flower at her mother's command. 
There's considerably more action in this 
scene than in the closeup preceding it — 
more details for the spectator to observe; 

• Continued on Page 114 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PAGE 107 




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two »wct oak**. 

•200. »lr«t rrlM 
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OBSCURED by the unpretentious 
title, "Calumet's Xmas Contest," is one 
of the most amusing 8mm. photoplays 
ever reviewed by Home Movies' staff 
and probably the best filming effort by 
a woman movie maker in some time. 
Inspiration for the story was a recent 
cake baking contest sponsored by 
makers of Calumet baking powder. The 
producer of this story film is Mrs. Jean 
Holbrook of Los Angeles, ably assisted 
by her husband in the dual role of actor 
and assistant camera man. Mrs. Hol- 
biook enacted the leading role. 

"You make a swell cake — why not 
try your luck?" wrote one cake baking 
enthusiast to another, advising of the 



contest. Recipient of the letter accept- 
ed the challenge and early scenes in the 
film show her whipping up ingredients 
for a cake to be entered in the contest. 
Then her troubles begin. 

A peddler knocks at the door. An- 
noyed, she answers, sends him on his 
way. Then, returning to her cake mix- 
ture, is not sure whether she already 
added baking powder. Two teaspoonsful 
more are added to the mixture, and be- 
cause of the doubled portion, the cake 
is a flop when taken from the oven. 

The lady trys again, this time to be 
interrupted by ringing of the telephone. 
She answers. It's the wrong number! 
Again she fails to remember if all in- 



• Above is pictured synopsis of the Movie 
of the Month. A friend's letter induces a 
housewife to enter a cakebaking contest. Her 
emphatic no! sends a pestering peddler on his 
way. Meantime, peddler's interruption causes 
cake to fail. She tries again, succeeds, only to 
have husband and his pals eat contest cake 
while she's out shopping. Illustrations are 
frame enlargements from Jean Holbrook's 
original 8mm. Kodachrome film. 



gredients have been added — duplicates 
the baking powder again, with the same 
unsuccessful result. 

A third try brings success, and a 
mouth-watering closeup shows a layer 
cake being iced with thick, brown choc- 
olate. The culinary gem is carefully cov- 
ered, placed on the kitchen cabinet, and 
the elated baker goes shopping. 

During her absence, friend husband 
returns from work, invites two com- 
panions, who drove him home, in for a 
drink. The trio make for the kitchen 
and after drinks are poured, one of the 
men, casually snooping around, discov- 
ers the cake. He hints that a cut of it 
would go well with the drink. The hus- 
band agrees, and unaware of his wife's 
contest ambitions, cuts liberally into the 
cake and distributes lavish cuts to his 
pals. 

Meantime his wife arrives, unnoticed 
• Continued on Page i iS 




UNDER 






• Each of the above movie titles features the art work in animation. The figures were drawn on card- 
board, cut out, and the necessary moving parts jointed. Animation was obtained by shooting one frame 
at a time — moving the figures as required between exposures. 



1MATEIR UIM.ITII1 n 
MOVIE TITLES... 




B y 



C E W . C 

Illustrations By C. E. Wittenbrook 



M 



1 



HE increasing popularity of ani- 
mated cartoons has whetted the ambi- 
tions of many amateurs who aspire to 
emulate the success of Walt Disney, 
Walter Lantz, Hugh Harman and oth- 
ers whose animation art is well known 
tc every theatre-goer. 

The average amateur, however, not 
skilled with the artist's pen, must be 
content with a simpler form of anima- 
tion than that of the Hollywood film 



cartoonists. One phase of this simpler 
art is animating figures in main, credit 
and end titles — a form of animation 
that does not require countless number 
of drawings but rather a single draw- 
ing, cut apart, which may be moved and 
photographed in stop motion. 

One movie amateur who has accom- 
plished this sort of title animation suc- 
cessfully is C. E. Wittenbrook of Tole- 
do, Ohio. Several of his clever titles are 



illustrated here as well as pictures show- 
ing how the animation is accomplished. 
Mr. Wittenbrook, a newspaper cartoon- 
ist, draws his characters on heavy paper 
or mat board. That portion of the body 
— head, legs, arms, etc. — which are to 
move, are drawn separately and then at- 
tached to body of the figure by means 
of dress snaps. (Sec Pg. 67, Feb. '42 
Home Movies — Ed.) The title is then 
arranged on a vertical titler which per- 
mits laying cut out figure flat on the 
title board. The figure is moved by hand, 
a fraction of an inch each time, and 




• Here is a clever End title any one can make because the animated 
figure of the mule and the background are reproduced below, ready 
to be cut out and assembled, ready to shoot. The author tells how 
to animate mule in the article beginning on this page. 




HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



each movement photographed in single 
frame exposures. 

Of course, Wittenbrook has the ad- 
vantage of many other amateurs in that 
he is a skilled artist. But others, wish- 
ing to try this simple animation plan, 
need only copy illustrations which are 
to be found in newspapers or magazines 
and then, by skillfully cutting out the 
moving parts — heads, arms, etc. — and 
joining them together again with dress 
snaps, as Wittenbrook did, can achieve 
equal results. And then it is always pos- 
sible to have an artist draw the figures 
needed for a special title at surprisingly 
small cost. 

One of the simplest animated titles 
filmed by Wittenbrook is "Happy Birth- 
day To You" pictured at top of page. 
In this title, the chubby little baker 
walks across the stage carrying the 
birthday cake. This was executed as 
follows: the baker was drawn minus 
legs. The legs were drawn on a black 
disc — six legs in all — and the disc at- 
tached to back of figure. Pushing the 
figure forward over a table top causes 
the disc to rotate and the feet to appear 
in natural walking motion. You've prob- 
ably seen this same device on toys. 
However, being unable to push or pull 
the figure across the stage by hand while 
filming the title, Wittenbrook merely 
placed the figure at left on the title 
board and moved it forward a fraction 
of an inch at a time, moving the disc 
proportionately, while filming this ac- 
tion a frame at a time. 

This same action could be filmed in c 
continuous movement where camera did 
not permit single frame photography, 
by shooting the title board horizontally. 
By attaching a stout wire to back of 
figure and painting it black, the figure 



• This sketch shows vertical titler constructed 
by C. E. Wittenbrook for purpose of ani- 
mating titles pictured here. A standard See- 
man Titler was mounted on a simple wooden 
support. Horizontal title board simplifies han- 
dling figures in animation work. 



thus could be drawn or pushed across 
the title card ; and the disc, rolling across 
titler base or table top, would rotate 
to give the illusion of moving feet. 

The next title, "Vacation Memories" 
is another which lends itself to continu- 
ous filming and will be of interest to 
those whose cameras do not provide for 
single frame exposure. Cut-out drawing 
of fisherman in boat is secured to back- 
ground and is gently rocked by means 
of a tab of cardboard extending out of 
scene. The figure of the huge fish is a 
separate drawing and is plunged sudden- 
ly into the scene from below in such a 
manner as to almost upset the boat. In 
executing this title in single frame pho- 
tography, Wittenbrook provided two 
heads for the fisherman, each with dif- 
ferent expressions — a calm countenance, 
and a startled one. As the fish strikes 
the boat, Wittenbrook substituted the 
first head for the second, to inject a 
note of realism in the action. 

Another effective title demonstrated 
by Wittenbrook was "Animated Car- 
toon Titles" pictured here in which fig- 
ure of the painter, swinging his brush 
back and forth, causes each letter in the 
text to appear magically one by one. 
This title was necessarily filmed in stop- 
motion. The painter's position on the 
scaffold was changed as necessary and 
the letters placed under the brush one 
at a time. The animation layout is in 
three parts: the scaffolding; the paint- 
er; and the painter's right arm. 

In the western title, the cowboy is 
hinged at the waist and the lariat is 
made of string. The pony is also jointed. 
During the action, the pony gallops, 
the cowboy rocks in his saddle and loops 
his lariat. In "Yellowstone Park," the 
surprised hunter moves head and arms 




while pleading to the bear to go away. 
The stork title is very simple. The cut- 
out of the baby is hinged in stork's beak 
and as stork walks across the stage, the 
baby swings to and fro. 

The "end" title produced by Witten- 
brook is one on which many amateurs 
will wish to try their animation skill. 
The mule is reproduced here, sketched in 
sections, as is the background. If you 
want to duplicate Wittenbrook's title, 
paste this illustration on a piece of card- 
board, then cut out the various pieces 
and join them together at the points 
A, B, C, etc., using dress snaps as clips. 
Then cut out the rail-fence background 
and attach the mule to it at the point 
marked D. The animation is as follows: 
the letters in the words "The End" come 
into the scene one by one from the 
right. The mule kicks into the air to 
meet each letter, kicking it up into 
space. The letter whirls dizzily and 
• Continued on Page 120 



• At right is a clever main title in which figure of hunter 
fires gun at rabbit. Each time gun is fired, smoke issue* from 
muiile and gun "kicks" back in natural manner. Photo at 
left pictures back of figure and shows how these effects were 
made possible. Cigarette smoke was blown through small rub- 
ber tube to give effect of gunfire. An invisible thread pulled 
the gun upward momentarily to effect motion of gun "kick." 





5©me SHOTS 
oundToledo 





• Production stills from Adventure Pictures' latest production, "Black Rider" — 
I: Camerman pauses while director McMahon straightens players out on a bit 
of action. 2: McMahon rehearsing player in gambling scene. 3: Stunt man 
making leap in chase scene —Photos by Reginald McMahon. 



Lantern c4mateur£ 
Jilm Western Z)kriller 



B y 



1, 



LN audacious group of youthful 
New Jersey amateurs, convinced Holly- 
wood producers leave much to be de- 
sired in the production of movie thrill- 
ers, recently organized an amateur pro- 
ducing unit under the imposing label 
of Adventure Pictures. Production has 
been concentrated on hard riding west- 
erns or jungle thrillers — minus hero- 
ines! The group believes that inexperi- 
enced, overly-made-up actresses fit awk- 
wardly into an amateur western picture. 

Adventure pictures is a throw-back 
to the early days of the movie industry 
at Fort Lee, New Jersey, when Bio- 
graph studios made two-reel thrillers 
there. Adventure's players are using the 
same locations that once ran red with 
the imaginary blood of grease-painted 
desperados shot with blank cartridges — 
and the camera. 

Louis McMahon, of Passaic, is direc- 
tor and producer of Adventure Pictures. 
His staff includes a technical advisor, 
musical director who aids in selection of 
recordings for theme music, a still pho- 
tographer, stunt man, make-up man, 
and several character actors. Studio 
"politics" is never a problem with Ad- 
venture Pictures. During the early days 
of its organization, it was agreed that 
whoever finances a production can play 
the hero. 



e Frame enlargements from "The Black 
Rider" showing fine main title, impressive 
superimposed shot, and two action scenes 
filmed in the best professional manner 



During production, the company 
travels to and from locations via local 
bus, loaded with several suitcases con- 
taining costumes, make-up, rifles, pis- 
tols and other properties. For "western" 
scenes, they use locations situated in the 
Patterson Mountains in New Jersey 
v. here an outlaw's stronghold is an 
abandoned rock quarry surrounded by 
crumbling old shacks with towering 
cliffs in the immediate background. 
Thick vegetation along banks of a near- 
by stream serves as backdrop for jungle 
thriller scenes. 



Adventure Pictures enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the first amateur group 
to have their films televised. Their great- 
est picture, "The Black Rider," was 
telecast over Columbia Broadcasting 
System's east coast television chain. 
Shortly afterward, the group was inter- 
viewed by Gilbert Seldes, director of 
Columbia's programs, who compliment- 
ed them with the statement that "The 
Black Rider" was the best western movie 
he had seen since "The Great Train 
Robbery," thriller of 1903! 

"The Black Rider" required four 
summers to complete at a cost of S200. 
Of the 300 feet of 16mm. film shot 
for this feature, only 1200 feet were 
used. During filming of this "hoss op- 
era," ingenuity had to be exercised con- 
stantly to keep expenses to a minimum 
without handicapping the elaborately 
written scenario. Where most amateur 
groups fail in attempting super-collos- 
sal pictures beyond their means, "The 
Black Rider" worked out fairly well as 
originally planned and conceived, be- 
, • Continued on Page 123 








til- 




"^rji a. 





1 10 




• Fig. I shows back-wind key and frame counter in place; Fig. 2 — key and counter detached; Fig. 3 — camera open, showing 
how rotary pin A motivates counter-shaft B. 



BACK W ID and 



{rame-coun ter 
(or the Jtodel "K " 

By ARTHUR M. SHARP 



In the March number of Home 
Movies, I described one of several gad- 
gets — a single-frame release — which I 
built for my Model K Cine Kodak. This 
month I shall describe two more — a 
frame counter and a backwind — two vi- 
tal camera features where serious cine- 
tography is to be attempted. 

If yours is a model K Cine Kodak you 
can move on to new and more thrilling 
cine accomplishments by installing a 
similar frame counter and a back-wind 
in your camera. The designing and in- 
stallation of these two features is reali- 
tively simple for anyone reasonably me- 
chanically inclined. 

The frame counter described and pic- 
tured here is especially simple to install; 
and it will afford accurate count of 
every single frame of film in the roll as 
it passes through the camera — forward 



or backward. Thus, when backwinding, 
it is possible to turn the film back to 
the exact frame, be it 20 or 120 frames 
or more. Should one be filming afield 
and desire to have a title appear at a 
certain place in the film without ne- 
cessity of shooting title on another roll 
of film, the frame counter will make 
this possible. All that is necessary is to 
make a memorandum of the frame num- 
ber on the counter after the scene is 
shot — for example No. 2320, cap the 
lens and run the film forward the num- 

* Fig. 4— another view of features shown 
in Fig. 3; Fig. 5 — showing film clip release; 
Fig. t — details for constructing back-wind 
and frame counter for Model K Cine 
Kodak. 



ber of frames required for the title — 
say 1 1 6. Make another note of the frame 
number again — which would be 2436 
— then remove lens cap and proceed 
with filming. 

Later, as convenient, camera may be 
taken into dark-room and the entire roll 
of film, now on the "exposed" spool, 
wound back upon the supply spool. 
Film is then re-threaded into camera. 
Making sure starting point is same as 
before, cap the lens and run camera 
• Continued on Page 120 



Fig. i 



BACK-WIND 

- K 



FRAME COUNTER 

Fo» rUotL 'k' Cine' kaois 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



CONTINUITY IDEAS 

IN ODD SHOTS 



EN C A R I N 



By W A R R 

w 

I I HILE most of us are in the 

throes of salvaging scrap of one kind or 
another for the war effort, the salvag- 
ing idea has caught on with a number of 
movie amateurs with result that scrap 
film is being salvaged and put to good 
use in lieu of other amateur movie activ- 
ities restricted by war economy. 

A case in point is movie maker Jack 
Shandler of the Los Angeles Gnema 
Club and his 300 foot 16mm. Koda- 
chrome picture, "An Office Girl's Rev- 
erie." Out of an assortment of odds 
and ends that graced the cutting room 
floor after numerous editing sessions, 
Shandler has contrived an amusing con- 
tinuity by adding a few planned scenes 
to tie the salvaged material together. In- 
teresting is how it happened. 

"After a nine months' illness," says 
Shandler, "I was finally permitted to 
get up and walk around the house. Well, 
you know how it is — just like being 
kept in the house on a rainy day; you 
pick up first one thing then another, 
just trying to keep out of mischief. The 
papers were full of news of salvage and 
scrap drives and this reminded me of 
the scrap I had tucked away in an old 
bottom drawer, the scrap film — ran- 
dom shots — that did not fit in with my 
editing plans and had been put away 
and saved for no particular reason. 

"As I fumbled among the numerous 
spools and coils of film, I decided to 
run some of the film off on the projec- 
tor. Just because I had nothing better 
to do, I decided that I would first splice 
a lot of this film together on a 400-foot 

• These frame enlargements afford a 
brief pictorial synopsis of "An Office 
Girl's Reverie," The tired steno dreams of 
huge winnings at Santa Anita, livishes the 
money on new clothes, then takes plane 
trip home to visit folks over holidays. Most 
of the footage was odds and ends from 
previous filmings which became a lively 
continuity when coupled with tie-in shots 
such as pictured in photos I and 3. 



reel so I could project it all with the 
least amount of trouble. I projected 
the reel over and over again. The more 
I projected it, the more it amused me. 
First thing I knew, I was doing a little 
editing — a little cutting and trimming 
here and there, sometimes placing the 
last scene near the middle, and the mid- 
dle one near the beginning — and then 
projecting the film again. My enthusi- 
asm began to rise. I said, 'Gee, I think 
I can make an interesting movie out of 
this junk.' So with pad and pencil I be- 
gan making notes as to what would be 
the simplest tie-in shots that I could 
make with a minimum of effort — re- 
membering that I was still restricted to 
very little outdoor activity." 

Shandler's collection of "junk" was 
the usual assortment of odd shots made 
on vacations, travels and journeys about 
the city. He had some fine shots made 
at Santa Anita during the racing season 
which included closeups of his wife in 
the grandstand expressing glee at hav- 
ing put a few bob on the nose of a win- 
ner. There were shots filmed on another 
occasion when they made an air tour 
over Boulder Dam; others, made indoors 
during a holiday celebration. 

With a little imagination, Shandler 
conceived a continuity that involved 
filming less than a half dozen tie-in 
shots. The story idea jelled when, upon 
asking Mrs. Shandler what she would 
do were she suddenly to come into un- 
expected money, she replied: "Why I'd 
buy a lot of clothes and take a trip!" 
That did it — here was Shandlers story 
plot. 

The completed picture tells of an 
overworked office secretary, cat-napping 
at her desk and dreaming she goes to the 
races. Here she is successful in picking 
several winners and the end of the day 
• Continued on Page 1 24 



112 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



• By filming rodeo and other rapid-action 
sports events at 32 frames per second, it is 
possible to present them in interesting, semi- 
slow motion on the screen. 




New Mexico Tourist Bureau 



Control T)ime Wit It 
Variable Camera Speed 



B y 



PORTER 



BLAIR 



.A.LMOST every cine camera to- 
day affords a variety of camera speeds, 
yet many owners of these cameras have 
yet to explore the interesting if not 
amusing effects to be gained by shoot- 
ing pictures at 8, 32 or 64 frames per 
second instead of the normal sixteen. 

For example, a speed of eight frames 
per second — half normal speed — will 
compress the time required for the ac- 
tion by making the motion appear twice 
as fast as normal. On the other hand, a 
higher speed, such as thirty-two frames 
per second, slows movement in the scene 
and makes the time element twice as 
long. 

The speed at which the camera is op- 
erating not only affects the time ele- 
ment on the screen, but also affects the 
time of exposure of the camera. The 
eight frames per second half-speed is 
more often used to gain exposure time 
rather than for some special effect in the 
action. For example, a filmer's camera 
exposes film at normal speed at i/}oth 
of a second. His lens is f/2.9 and he 
wants to shoot a well lighted street at 
night with Kodachrome. By setting 
camera speed at 8 frames, he will gain 
increased exposure equivalent to approx- 
imately f/1.9. Of course, any move- 
ment within the scene would be speed- 

TWA Photo 



ed up and for this reason shots of this 
kind should not include vehicles or 
people. 

Two very important things must be 
remembered when shooting in normal 
light at half speed: (1) be sure to de- 
crease exposure by stopping down lens 
(because of the lengthened exposure 
time allowed by slower movement of 

• Scenes of majestic waterfalls and of roll- 
ing surf, as pictured below, become more im- 
pressive on the screen in the lanquid, slower 
motion provided by 24 or 32 frames per sec- 
ond camera speed. 



the shutter) and, (2) camera must be 
held as steadily as possible — preferably 
on a substantial tripod. The first may 
be taken care of by closing down the 
lens one full stop when changing cam- 
era speed indicator. The second is equal- 
ly important, for when speed of subject 
is increased, any jiggling or sidesway in 
the camera is likewise increased and 
shows up painfully on the screen. Pan- 
ning should never be done at 8 frames 
per second. 

• Continued on Page 1 18 



r.^ig h I 



Harold M. Lambert 



PACE 114 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 




Titler 

Pictured here is a simple camera stand 
which enables me to photograph the ti- 
tles that appear in Home Movies each 
month without having to cut titles from 
the book. Quarter-inch plywood was 
used in the construction and the cam- 
era screw set to place the camera lens 
eight inches from the title. The auxil- 
iary lens was necessarily attached di- 
rectly to the camera lens by means of 
scotch tape, although a simple lens hold- 
er could easily be fashioned from anoth- 
er piece of plywood and attached to the 
base. 

This stand, in conjunction with my 
remote control single-frame device and 
a telegraph-key for a foot switch for 
the photofloods also provides me a per- 
fect stage for animating cartoons. — 
Arthur M. Sharp, Centredale, R. I. 

Faking Gunsmoke 

Recently when confronted with prob- 
lem of making gunfire seem real in a 
scene when only a cap pistol was avail- 
able as a prop weapon, realism was in- 
jected into the action as follows: 

Action of player firing the gun was 
filmed at moderate distance with a 



WANTED! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's' no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they duplicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

....Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 



THE EXPERIMENTAL 



bright area backgrounding the pistol 
so absence of flash and smoke would be 
concealed. This scene was cut short 
right after player pulled the trigger. 
The next shot was a tight closeup of the 
pistol with smoke issuing realistically 
from the muzzle. 

This was accomplished by having the 
camera and lights in readiness, then 
lighting a match and thrusting it inside 
pistol barrel. As smoke started to curl 
upward from muzzle, camera was start- 
ed, recording this effect briefly. This 
scene, cut immediately after the one de- 
scribed above, creates the illusion of the 
pistol having been fired and is made 
more real by the dramatic closeup. — 
George H. Harkness, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Reflector 

An ordinary white opaque window 
shade serves admirably as a sunlight 
reflector when filming exterior scenes. 
Favorable feature is fact blind may be 
rolled up into small space when not in 
use as compared to space required by 
rigid type of reflectors. 

Where more brilliant reflection is re- 
quired than that afforded by the natural 
white surface of the blind, the blind 
may be painted with aluminum or 
chrome aluminum paint or surfaced 




with silver leaf. A shade 24 to 30 inches 
wide is the easiest to handle. 

In use, an assistant unrolls shade and 
holds same just outide of camera range 
in such a way as to reflect sunlight into 
the scene or upon a player or object. — 
Sterling Yancey, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Vertical Titling 



Many amateurs, with vertical titling 
outfits who have tried to align their 
cameras with title board center by 
means of a plumb bob, have found that, 
contrary to general opinion, centering 
cannot be achieved by use of plumb bob 
alone. Reason for this is that even 
though camera is actually pointing away 
from title center the slightest degree, 



i! 




the plumb bob will hang suspended in 
a straight line, pointing to an erroneous 
center. 

In order to correctly line up camera 
on a vertical titler by the plumb bob 
method, it is also necessary to set cam- 
era perfectly vertical with the aid of a 
small spirit level. These may be had at 
small cost at most variety stores. Cam- 
era should be checked for vertical on 
two sides. Best method for attaching 
plumb bob to lens is to use a rubber 
lens cap (or any snug-fitting substi- 
tute) and punch a hole in the exact cen- 
ter. Thread plumb bob line through 
this hole, knotting end of line on in- 
side of lens cap, and place cap over lens. 
— Warmr Crouell, Altoona, Pa. 

Leaders and Trailers 

It is a simple task to prepare film for 
leaders and trailers which eliminates the 
objectionable flashes of grey or white 
011 the screen preceding and following 
the picture, and which also may be rec- 
ognized as either the leader (beginning 
of the film) or the trailer (following 
the end title) . 

For leaders, load positive film in the 
camera, point lens — wide open — toward 
bright sky (not sun!), and expose the 
desired footage. After developing this 
film to a negative, the film will be jet 
black and fully opaque in the picture 
area. The margins will be clear — which 
identifies the film as leader. 

For trailers, remove film from cam- 
era and expose the length desired to sun- 
light, being careful that all of the film 
area is equally exposed. After develop- 
ing to a negative, entire film area, in- 
cluding the margins, will be black. The 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL PACE 115 

CUE WORKSHOP 9<u , 9eU> trUkl & 



cue: film completely black is trailer; 
film black with clear margins is leader. 
— Lotus J. Milne, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Backgrounds In Motion 

Some of the most novel titling effects 
are the most simple. Take the moving 
background effect for example — back- 
grounds such as moving shafts of light 
or spiral effects. Either of these can be 
produced with a small typewriter titler 
as illustrated in sketch. 

The titler is placed on a table or 
workbench with title card holder near 
edge of table. A disc of heavy card- 
board, about 8 inches in diameter and 
decorated with color wedges or a spiral, 
as desired, is attached to edge of table 
top by means of a nail, as shown, and 
rotated as the camera is started. 

The revolving background may be 
filmed separately and the title superim- 
posed over it by means of double expos- 
ure, or the background and title may be 




photographed simultaneously by letter- 
ing title text on glass or celluloid and 
placing same in title card holder. In 
either case, care must be exercised in 
lighting the disc in order to prevent any 
shadows of title card frame falling upon 
it. — Duane Kitfredge, Albany, N. Y. 

Chain-A-Pod 

Suggested here is the "chain-a-pod," 
an easy-to-make, low-cost cine gadget 
for the filmer who finds a regular tripod 
cumbersome on field trips. The chain-a- 
pod will afford rigid support to any 
make of camera when used as illustrat- 
ed: the chain, attached to camera and 
extended to the ground, is held firm- 



















y> 




•Jerew T» 




I Fit Camera 












fl < 




^ -J 


-t 


MM 




7 77 


T . 
\ I 


- X 

3o<5 Chain 


( 


u 













ly by one foot at the desired length. 
Pulling camera against chain thus held, 
exerts steadiness. 

To construct, obtain necessary length 
of dog chain from hardware or variety 
store. Also purchase a %"x2o thumb 
screw and drill a hole into the head 
large enough to accommodate a small 
spring snap as shown in sketch. In most 
instances, this snap will already be at- 
tached to the dog chain. (If chain is 
not long enough, buy two and splice 
them together). — /. F. Stuard, Old 
Hickory, Tenn. 

Sunshade 

Here is a low-cost sunshade and fil- 
ter-holder idea for owners of model B 
Cine Kodaks: From our local telephone 
office, I obtained one of the old type 
telephone mouthpieces. Using a center 
punch, I knocked out the perforated 
segment; then with a coarse finger nail 
file, I smoothed the inside so that it 
would fit snugly over the lens' regular 
filter holder which is also part of the 
Eastman portrait lens holder. I then 




shortcut* contri- 
buted by, CinebugJ 



purchased the desired filters of a size 
tc fit the inside rim where the perforat- 
ed segment was removed. Other meth- 
ods for fitting the filters in this holder 
are as follows: place filter between 
housing and sunshade; wedge larger fil- 
ters in curved portion of sunshade; or 
where still larger filter disks are used, 
affix them in front of sunshade by means 
of scotch tape around the edge. — Earl 
R. Hardesty, Halethorpe, Md. 

Light Standard 

With the metal shortage curtailing 
the manufacture of metal tripods and 
photoflood light standards, the average 
amateur can build suitable standards of 
wood by following the accompanying 
diagram. Lumber required is z"x.i" pine 
for the legs and lower upright member, 
and i" material for the adjustable top 
member. Legs should be 18" in length, 
each cross member in one piece and fit- 



DETAIL Of LAMP STAND 




ted with the other in an inter-locking 
joint. 

Upright is fitted to legs by means of 
angle irons, and the top member, which 
must be slotted, is bolted to the lower 
member and secured by a thumb nut. 
While casters are suggested for the legs, 
an alternative is to attach small blocks 
or rubber button tacks to the cross 
members instead. — Milo Hubbard, Ak- 
ron, Ohio. 



PAGE 116 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 




WHERE TO RENT OR BUY 8MM. and 16MM. FILMS 



1 O augment your home movie shows, make use of the fine libraries 
of rental films, both sound and silent, maintained by your photo dealer for 
owners of 8mm. and i6mm. projectors. Rental rates are surprisingly low and 
new films are added at regular interv als. Dealers listed below will gladly assist 
with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 



CALIFORNIA 



HOLLYWOOD 

Bailey Film Service 
Ii5l Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
716 N. La Brea Ave. 

Castle's Inc. 
1529 Vine Street 

LOS ANGELES 

Films Incorporated 
1709 W. 8th Street 

Robert Crawford Pictures 
1702 Kingsley Dr. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
Photo & Sound, Inc. 
153 Kearny St. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1221 G St., N. W. 



ILLINOIS 

BERWYN 

Colonial Camera Shop 
6906 Windsor Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1825 Larchmont Ave. 

Rims Incorporated 
64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 



INDIANA 



INDIANAPOLIS 

W. Stuart Bussey 

17 East St. Joseph St. 



KANSAS 



WICHITA 



Jeff's Camera Shop 
139 N. Broadway 

Lewis Film Exchange 
216 East 1st St. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



Don Elder's Film Library 
739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 

F-a-» _3-e i'i Cc~^3 _ . 

S Little Building 



MICHICAN 



Detroit Camera Shop 
325 State Street 



NEW YORK 



KEN WORE 



Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
281 1 Delaware Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Films Incorporated 
330 W. 42nd St. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 45th St. 

Haber & Fink. Inc. 
12-14 Warren St. 

Medo Photo Supply 
15 West 47th St. 

National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 

Nu-Art Films. Inc. 
145 West 45th Street 



OHIO 



CINCINNATI 



Haile & Assoc. (B & H Branch) 
215 Walnut St. (Within 100 Miles) 



DAYTON 



Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 



ORECON 



PORTLAND 



Films Incorporated 
314 S. W. 9th Avenue 



TEXAS 



DALLAS 



National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 
2024 Main St. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON 

Elmer B. Simpson 
816 W. Virginia St. 



3$ y,ou want a 
FILM to AllOU 

. . . NEWS OF TIMELY SUB|ECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Battle for Tunisia, available in 8mm. 
and 1 6mm. silent or sound from Castle 
Films, Inc., New York City, N. Y. and 
affiliated distributors. 

The newest of Castle releases, it pic- 
tures the air fighting that has marked 
the Allies' struggle for Tunisia in all its 
fury. Nazi Stukas are shot down by 
Yank airmen; ground forces clash in 
battle for vital mountain passes while 
a daring cameraman films it all from a 
nearby hilltop. This new Castle Film 
shows the importance attached by each 
s'de to the struggle by the intensity and 
fun,' of attack and counter-attack in 
the Battle for Tunisia which is said to 
be the prelude to the expected great 
Allied invasion of Europe. 




Of Mice and Men, n reels 16mm. 
black and white sound film is released 
by Post Pictures Corporation, 723 Sev- 
enth Ave., N. Y. City. This is the the- 
atrical film version of the famous Stein- 
beck novel of the same name starring 
Betty Fields. Burgess Meredith and Lon 
Chaney, Jr. Story concerns George and 
Lennie, two vagrant farm laborers. A 
series of unfortunate circumstances fol- 
lowing Lennie's interest in Mae. the 
rancher's daughter, brings story to 
tragic conclusion. Picture is notable for 
excellent photography and scriptwrit- 
ing and offers a valuable study for am- 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PACE 117 



.ueur hlmcrs interested in these cine- 
matic techniques. 




Ancient Trails of North Africa, 
1 6mm. black and white in sound, is one 
of latest films released for sale or rent 
by Bell & Howell's Filmosound library, 
1 80 1 Larchmont Ave., Chicago. 

Said to be one of the latest lecture 
rilms on Africa, it pictures Count Byron 
de Prorok, note archeologist of thirty 
international expeditions in scenes of 
darkest Africa. The him traces the 
known and conjectured history of early 
day men through ancient Rome, Carth- 
age and the Berbers, and back to the 
troglodytes and their shadowy paleo- 
lithic predecessors. The work of arche- 
ologists is fascinatingly presented. 



Revenge on the Range is available in 
8mm. silent or 16mm. silent or sound 
on film from Castle Films, Inc., 30 
Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y. C, or their 
affiliated dealers and distributors. 

It's an old-time western portraying 
a feud of furious fisticuffs in grand 
wild west manner. A crooked ranch 
foreman and the hero are rivals for hand 
of the ranch owner's daughter. There's 
the usual dirty work at the cross roads, 
the hero falsely accused, a thundering 
ride with a posse, rustlers, terrific hand- 
to-hand fighting, then complete vindi- 
cation for the hero and the final award 
— a kiss and embrace of the rancher's 
daughter whose hand he's won. 

Charlie Chaplin Festival, 8 reels, 
1 6mm. silent, black and white is a new 
release available from Commonwealth 
Pictures, 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. Picture is a compilation of the 
best sequences from some of Chaplin's 



I HELP SHORTEN 

I THE WAR! 

I BUY MORE BONDS. . . 

■ AND KEEP ON BUYING MORE BONDS 





No matter how often this message is brought to our attention . . . 
no matter how many bonds we buy . . . it's not often enough - nor 
bonds enough. 

Although KiN-o-LUX efforts are devoted to supplying the govern- 
ment, you can still buy many KIN-O-LUX products at your dealer. 



KIN-O-LUX 

INC. 

105 WEST 40th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



SALE! AG FA LITE 



A PORTABLE LIGHTING UNIT 
OF EXTREME FLEXIBILITY 




This unique lighting unit finds many 
uses in both studio work and home por- 
traiture. Incorporating a clever panto- 
graph mechanism with rapid vertical 
adjustment, the Agfalite positions two 
lamps with a separation of 11 to 36 Inches 
at any point up to almost 8 feet above 
floor level. Weighing slightly over 23 
pounds, the entire unit is portable, pack- 
ing quickly into a 9x10x30 inch carrying 
case. Agfalite is finished in brown 
cra«kle enamel and is supplied with ad- 
justable diffusing screen, detachable cas- 
ters, sockets, reflectors, approved wiring. 
List Price, without lamps $25.00 



SALE 
PRICE 



$ 



15 



.95 



Mail Orders Filled 



32nd St. 
near 6th Ave. 




New York 
City 



PACE 118 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 




New "Professional Jr." Tripod 

Worthwhile 16mm. filming, whether silent or 
sound, requires a sturdy yet versatile tripod 
built along professional lines. The new 
"PROFESSIONAL JR." is built to precision 
standards, weighs but 14 lbs. Friction type 
head gives super-smooth pan and tilt action. 
"Spread-leg" design assures utmost rigidity 
and quick, positive height adjustment. Camera 
platform takes EK Cine Special, B&H Filmo, 
Bolex or Berndt-Maurer Cameras; also adapt- 
able for 35mm. Eyemo, DeVry, etc. Used by 
the U. S. Gov't, leading 16mm. producers and 
newsreel companies. 

Send for literature describing 14 features thoroughly. 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT CO. 



1600 Broadway 



New York. N. Y. 



KODACHROME 
8MM. TRAVEL FILMS 16MM. 

SUPERB FILMS IN GLORIOUS COLOR 
"WAIKIKI HULA GIRLS." The real McCoy! You 
will be delighted. Projection length scene $1.00. Col- 
or sample, complete lists 10c in coin. Hundreds of 
fine film subjects for grown-ups; for children. Color, 
black and white, silent or sound. Also Castle. Holly- 
wood. Official Films. Stamp brings catalogues. 

"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS." Three new Sensa- 
tional subjects, featuring stunning beauties as you 
like them. Stamp brings catalogues. 

"PARTY RECORDS." Something new in snappy 
adult entertainment. Stamp brings catalogues. 

FILMS EXCHANGED— Only first class subjects 
in good condition accepted. Give details about your 
films. State subjects, types desired. SWAP your 200 
ft. 8mm film and $1.00; your 400 ft. 16mm. and 
$2.00: or your 400 ft. sound film and $3.50 for an- 
other film. Stamp brinps catalogues. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
EAIA precision All-Metal 8mm. Film Slltter..$2.75 
FOTOFADE DTE for making Chemical Fades ... 1.25 

FOTOFADE WIPE-OFF TAPE, per roll 60 

CINETINTS. Set 6 Colors with Instructions ... 3.25 

DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each S5 

HOME MOVIES. Back Issues, 1937-38-39 15 

Not all months in any year. 1940-41-42 30 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS— E»eh 

Double 8 50c Univex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS, Double 8mm. and Single 8 size. 10c 

100 ft. and 50 ft. l«mm 15c 

MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FIILM 
Speed 6 In. Photoflood Light. Laboratory Packed. 
Dbl. 8— 33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; 400 ft. $5.50; 
Sgl. 8—33 ft. 45c; 100 ft. $1.00; 400 ft. $3.50; 
16mm. 100 ft. $1.25; 400 ft. $5.00. 
Clear, Purplehaze. Yellow. Amber, Special Blue 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orderi 
Cash. Check or M. O. for quick service. 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phono Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 



graduate to a Seemann 




best early day silent films. These are as 
entertaining today as they were when 
first released. Out of such popular 
Chaplin films as Easy Street, The Ad- 
venturer, The Cure and The Immigrant 
is "The Charlie Chaplin Festival" made 
up in a streamlined version guaranteed 
to be as entertaining to the younger 
generation of movie fans as elders who 
will never tire of Chaplin's style of 
comedy. 

World At War is a feature length mo- 



tion picture in i6mm. sound being made 
available for outright sale at low cost to 
schools, libraries, churches, clubs and 
other non-theatrical organizations. Said 
to be the pictorial history of ten years 
of planned fascist terror, this timely 
documentary, written and produced by- 
Samuel Spewack for the Office of War 
Information should find ready sale 
among educational institutions. Net 
price of film is $36.29 and is available 
direct from Castle's New York, Chica- 
go and San Francisco regional offices. 



~M,ovie 0/ the -Month • . . 



• Continued from Page 107 

until she enters the kitchen. There she 
finds husband and his companions mer- 
rily drinking and eating her prize 
cake! "My cake," she screams and falls 
in a faint ending the picture. 

Simple as the plot may seem, it is 
embellished by some mighty fine cine- 
matic effects — deft touches such as one 
finds only in professional pictures and 
which succeed in arousing considerable 
laughter. For one thing, the entire pic- 
ture was wisely filmed in closeups and 
medium shots, essential to this kind of 
a story where details of the action must 
be grasped quickly by the audience if 
the plot is to register and story pace is 
to be maintained. 

For example, Mrs. Holbrook filmed 
the three men leaving the car at the 
curb and followed them with the cam- 
era as they proceeded to the front door. 
Then, inside the house, she picked up 
the action in a closeup of three pairs of 
feet crossing the threshold. Following 
this is a medium closeup of three top- 
coats being tossed, one by one, on the 
sofa. Then to indicate procession of the 
trio to the kitchen, the camera again 
was trained in a closeup on the lower 
part of the swinging door leading to the 
kitchen where the men's feet were 
filmed entering the kitchen — a point 
made immediately clear by virtue of the 
linoleum on the floor. Thus, Mrs. Hol- 
brook very professionally transported 
her characters from the front door to 
the kitchen in three brief but very ef- 
fective shots. 

Cutting to re-action shots, some of 
which are reproduced here, was very 
skillfully done, indicating that Mrs. 
Holbrook is another amateur who pro- 
fits through careful study of profes- 
sional movies. Another reason for the 
success of this picture is Mrs. Hol- 
brook's ability in amateur dramatics 
and her skill and patience in wringing 
the last ounce of histrionic talent from 
an amateur cast. Good acting is a high- 
light of the picture. 

Other commendable phases of this 



filmer's camera work are crisp, sharp 
focus and perfect exposure to be noted 
in every scene, interior as well as ex- 
terior. For her titles, she used small 
block letters tinted red, arranged on or- 
namental backgrounds of subdued tone. 
Titles were ample, and are lacking 
only when speech of the players is so 
obvious in closeups as to make spoken 
titles superfluous. 

Mrs. Holbrook's Movie of the Month 
certificate is a well deserved award. Al- 
ready her film is being accepted as a 
standard of perfection by fellow mem- 
bers of her cine club who, most of them 
being men, now have a greater respect 
for their feminine contemporaries. 

Variable Camera 
Speed* . . . 

• Continued from Page 1/3 

Some makes of cine cameras provide 
for speeds of 8, 16, 24, 32, 48, and 64 
frames per second. Others include only 
the 8, 16, and 32, providing for half 
and double speed in addition to the nor- 
mal speed of 16 f. p. s. There is prob- 
ably no reason for this other than the 
fact that mechanical design precluded 
the possibility of providing all five 
speeds, not that the average amateur 
ever has use for all of them. 

Twenty-four frames per second is the 
established speed for sound film. All 
sound motion pictures or silent movies 
filmed with the object of dubbing in 
sound later are filmed at this speed and, 
of course, are projected at the same 
speed. Many amateurs, who have no 
thought of using sound, frequently 
shoot at 24 frames because it smooths 
action when the film is screened at 
16 f. p. s. 

Twenty-four frames represents a fifty 
per cent increase in camera speed and 
means that each frame is exposed for 
only 1 /45 th of a second, in the case of 
cameras giving a normal 1 30th sec- 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PAGE 119 



ond exposure. This also means the lens 
must be opened up i 2 stop to compen- 
sate for the decreased shutter exposure. 

Cinefilmers experienced in still pho- 
tography know that in order to stop 
fast moving action it is necessary to 
shoot at a faster shutter speed ; and that 
in order to capture an action picture of 
a moving object, it is necessary to set 
shutter for 1 100th of a second instead 
of 1/ joth. This is the principle behind 
the use of 24 f. p. s. speed for normal 
action just described — the slightly fast- 
er shutter in combination with a wider 
lens opening succeeds in "stopping" ac- 
tion without blur. Each frame in th; 
action sequence will be sharper than if 
t.iken at normal camera speed and this 
sharpness will be reflected in a clearer 
image on the screen. 

An important use of the 24 frames 
speed is in shooting scenes from a mov- 
ing automobile, train or other convey- 
ance and if the road is a rough one, it 



CINEMATOGRAPHER George Barnes 
achieved a novel and effective fadeout for a 
closeup scene of Cary Grant in RKO's 
"From Here to Victory" recently. Fadeout 
was effected entirely by use of lights. 

In place of the usual method of making 
a fade with automatic shutter or chemicals, 
cinematographer Barnes had the electrician 
set up a battery of baby spotlights, con- 
trolled by a circuit of dimming switches. 
The key light was a spotlight suspended just 
below the camera and so masked that it sent 
a tiny beam of light across the star's eyes. 

The scene is a tight closeup of Grant's face 
showing his reaction after he has learned 
that his two brothers have been killed in 
the war. As it ends, the shadows creep 
across his face (by gradually dimming the 
spotlights) until nothing is left on the 
screen but his grief-filled eyes. Holding on 
them a moment, the scene fades out to utter 
blackness, although the camera lens is wide 
open. 

* * * 

FOUR process screens, used for back- 
ground projection shots, were recently used 
by Universal for a single shot in "Flesh and 
Fantasy." This is a record number of pro- 
cess screens ever to be used in Hollywood 
and the result achieved is amazing. 

The setting is of a mountain, bisected by 
a waterfall. Two screens, one on either side, 
carry projections of the distant mountains. 
Two more screens, one on top of the other, 
are in the middle and the waterfall, with a 
rushing stream at its base, is projected on 
them. 

In all, four background projectors were 
used. Chief difficulty was in getting lighting 
to match for all four screens; synchroniza- 
tion of the four projectors with camera was 
also a problem, but successfully overcome by 
cinematographers John Fulton and John 
Boles. 



may even be advisable to use a higher 
camera speed. 

Filming at 32 f. p. s. produces half - 
speed action on the screen or slow mo- 
tion. While not slow enough to be used 
for action analysis of athletic events, 
etc., it is useful for many purposes by 
the average amateur in his everyday 
film ng. The filming at 32 frames of a 
fast moving waterfall, of roaring surf 
or high waves, will impart a beauty and 
poetry to the motion on the screen. 
Rapid fire action such as boxing bouts 
and rodeo events can be made more in- 
teresting to observe on the screen be- 
cause the movement in the scene, other- 
wise too fast to be carefully and fully 
observed, unfolds slowly enough for the 
eye to record details. 

Where fast motion amplifies move- 
ment of an unsteady camera, slow mo- 
tion minimizes it. For this reason, 32 
frames speed is often used for telephoto 
shots, especially in following action 
such as races, etc. The same exposure 



A NEW "high" in dissolves was recently 
accomplished by Ray Rennahan, cinematog- 
rapher for Paramount's "Lady In the Dark" 
starring Ginger Rogers. Dissolve was accom- 
plished in a combination of camera move- 
ment and shutter manipulation. 

Involved was a zooming boom shot so 
rapid and with such sudden elevation that 
the cameraman had to be tied to his seat and 
the Technicolor camera doubly bolted to its 
base, lest the "whip" of the boom dislodge 
them both. 

The trick effect sought was a dissolve of 
Miss Rogers from her everyday life into 
her dream world. A track for the camera 
boom was laid the entire length of the 
stage and it was necessary for end of the 
crane to zoom into the rafters as the shot 
was completed. 

Requiring split-second timing, camera fol- 
lows Miss Rogers as she paces floor of her 
apartment, moves into a closeup, then backs 
away so rapidly and to such a height that 
the actress appears suddenly to shrink to a 
mere dot on the screen. 

The second take, lap-dissolved over this, 
is of a circus sketch for a magazine which 
Miss Rogers has been holding. It swells to 
immense proportions until the border be- 
comes a frame through which she climbs in- 
to a circus setting. 

STATE of Utah recently sent officials to 
Hollywood to convince studios Utah offers 
best outdoor locations in the west — next to 
California, of course. Selling points were: no 
dim-out regulations, ample rail, bus and other 
transportation facilities, and a freshness of 
locale, not to mention unrivaled outdoor 
beauty of the state. 

Arrangements are being made to supply 
studios with 16mm. Kodachrome films of 
any possible locations required in the state, 
with special shots made when required. 




HOLLYWOOD NOTEBOOK 

By WARREN CARIN 



For Long Service From Your 




(Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.) 



Glass- Beaded 
SCREEN 

Follow These Simple Rules 

Follow These Simple Rules: 

Now, when new Da-Lite Screens are 
being made only for training our 
armed forces and war workers, it is 
especially important for Da-Lite own- 
ers to take good care of their equip- 
ment. Although the mountings for 
the Da-Lite Challenger Tripod Screen, 
the Model B and other case-enclosed 
screens are exceptionally strong and 
durable, the fabrics must be kept clean. 

By observing a few simple rules, 
you can be sure of getting the maxi- 
mum number of years of satisfactory 
service from your screen. ( 1 ) Re- 
move loose dry dust from th» glass- 
beaded surface with a soft brush or 
by touching lightly with a chamois. 
(2) Don't let anyone put fingers on 
the surface as the marks will mean 
blotches in your pictures. (3) Re-roll 
the screen after using, being careful 
not to wrinkle it and that you do not 
roll up insects or particles which may 
have adhered to the surface during 
its use. 

.—If you have any doubts about how 
to care for your equipment, see your 
Da-Lite dealer or write us. 



DA-LITE SCREEN CO., Inc. 

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PACE 120 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



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problem presents itself as before, when 
8 frame speed was used, except in this 
instance, the lens is opened up one full 
stop to compensate for the 1/2 normal 
camera speed. 

Ultra-slow motion photography is ac- 
complished at speeds of either 48 or 64 
f.p.s. Most cameras provide only the 
latter speed which is used mostly for 
filming athletic events for analytical 
study or stress analysis in aircraft tests. 
At this speed, film passes the lens at a 
terrific rate, a hundred foot roll being 
consumed surprisingly fast. The screen- 
ing time, however, remains the same as 
with film exposed at normal speed. 

Sixty-four f.p.s. calls for a four times 
increase in exposure or opening up the 
lens two full stops. Obviously a very 
fast lens would be required for gen- 
eral use of this speed, especially with 
color film. Use of superspeed panchro- 
matic will overcome difficulties encoun- 
tered where lens is not sufficiently fast. 

The amateur, seeking absurd com- 
edy effects, can profitably employ the 
6a frame speed. I recently saw an ama- 
teur's film of a club picnic in which 



one of the picnickers was pictured be- 
ing chased by a billy goat he chanced to 
tease. The goat, filmed at 8 frames, ap- 
peared on the screen traveling at a ter- 
rific rate, while the escaping picnicker, 
photographed in separate shots at 64 
frames per second, sought to escape the 
onrushing goat in a slow, night-mareish 
gait. 

Still another use for slow motion, not 
extensively explored by the amateur, is 
in photographing miniature sets in 
which action takes place. In theatrical 
pictures, all miniature sets are filmed at 
48 or 64 frames in order to effect a 
more natural movement of objects such 
as miniature ships, water, etc. Explo- 
sions at sea, filmed in studio miniature 
tanks, are likewise filmed at high cam- 
era speeds. 

Next time you go forth to film, con- 
sider how a slower or faster camera 
speed may improve a certain shot. Don't 
hesitate to experiment, for you will 
make many discoveries that will prove 
worth while in your future picture 
making. 



cAnimation in Atovie T)itle£ . . . 



• Continued from Page 109 

comes to rest in its proper place in the 
title. All of the action, of course, is 
photographed one frame at a time, the 
mule and the letters being moved by 
hand as required to complete the action. 

When Wittenbrook produced the ti- 
tle "Some Shots Around Toledo," he 
went in for a bit of realism in the gun 
f re action. In the photo at left of title 
is shown manner in which this filmer 
rigged up a small rubber tube behind 
figure of the hunter, also a piece of 
black thread. To simulate action of gun 
fire, cigarette smoke was blown through 
the tube which emerged from point of 
gun. At the same time, the gun and 
hunter's arm was jerked upward to ef- 
fect the "kickback" action of firing of 
the gun. Here again, is another bit of 
animation that required no stop motion 
photography but was shot in continu- 
ous action while an assistant manipulat- 
ed the title figure. 

Titles of this kind are best animated 
on a vertical titler. The title board is 
flat and the figures laid upon it, and 
are thus moved more easily and their 
positions held in place more readily than 
if the action was attempted in a hori- 
j zontal titler. Wittenbrook's titler is 
shown in Fig. 4. He built most of it 
himself. It consists of a sturdy upright 
and flat title board. A Seemann titler, 
with title card holder removed, was at- 
tached at top of support. The photo- 
flood lamp holders are a part of the See- 
mann titler. Camera lens is 24 inches 



from title board and the lamps are ap- 
proximately 20 inches away. 

Wutenbrook's title letters are made 
of celluloid with angular tabs which 
permit affixing the letters to a black 
title board made up of narrow ribs of 
wood set close together and coverad 
with black velour. Incidentally, black 
velour or cotton pile velvet is an essen- 
tial background for title making where 
"invisible" black threads or wires must 
be used to motivate the illustrations. 

Model "K " 

(Backwind . . . 

• Continued from Page m 

until 2320 frames have registered in the 
frame counter. 

The 116-frame unexposed area of the 
film reserved for the title is now ready 
for exposure. In this manner, it is pos- 
sible to title an entire roll of film with- 
out a splice. Incidentally, it is necessary 
to explain that winding back the full 
roll of film is beyond the capacity of 
the windback, next to be described, as 
will be seen later, and therefore this op- 
eration must be done by hand. 

Another advantage of this accurate 
frame-counting wind-back is that it 
makes possible the filming of titles su- 
perimposed over scenes especially pho- 
tographed for title backgrounds, or to 
superimpose spoken titles over scenes 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 

of persons speaking, thus adding a note 
of realism. 

The frame counter may be detached 
or put on again in a few seconds simply 
by screwing it into the socket provided 
in the camera cover. The counter I used 
for this purpose is manufactured by 
the Veeder Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn., 
and counts up to 99,999. Most of the 
parts necessary for its installation I 
found in my workshop junk box. Con- 
struction details may be found in the 
diagrams in Fig. 6 and in the various 
photos. 

A small phone tip, A in Fig. 3, ob- 
tained from a radio supply house was 
drilled out, as shown in Fig. 6, to make 
a press fit over the pin which actuates 
the pull down claw of the camera's 
intermittent movement. The pin makes 
one revolution for each frame exposed. 
Thus, as pin A revolves, it turns pin B, 
(Figs. 3 and 4) which is connected with 
the counter shaft. As the counter shaft 
makes one revolution, the number 
changes one digit. 

To determine exact point to drill hole 
in camera case for Veeder counter, al- 
low sufficient length in the phone tip 
when shortening it so that when pressed 
half-way onto the pin A, it will scrape 
away the paint and scribe a circle in- 
side the camera cover when cover is 
snapped in place. Then, finding the ex- 
act center of this circle, drill a 15/32" 
hole to receive the bushing shown in 
Fig. 6. Final step is to mount counter 
and lock in place by fitting pin in shaft 
which engages the revolving phone tip. 

The backwind is pictured in Figs. 1 
and 2 and consists of a simple key fitted 
into the camera case cover and contact- 
ing the sprocket (E in Fig. 5) by means 
of a specially constructed shaft arrange- 
ment shown in the diagram in Fig. 6. 
To back wind film, simply press in on 
key until it makes proper contact with 
the sprocket. Turn key until desired 
number of frames have been wound 
back, as determined by the counter. It 
is also possible to count the frames, 
as they are being wound back, from 
the audible "click" made as they pass 
the film gate. 

Since the average back-wind require- 
ments rarely exceed sixty frames, I have 
made no attempt to provide a take-up 
mechanism for the wound-back film. 
There is ample room for 60 frames of 
film to back up behind the film sprock- 
et without danger of jamming or dam- 
aging film. Another thing to be consid- 
ered is that backwinding depends upon 
a partially unwound motor spring. If 
the camera spring is wound up tight, it 
is impossible to back-wind the film, as 
the back-winding action automatically 
winds up the motor spring. It is import- 
ant to remember, therefore, never to 
wind up the spring immediately after 
filming a scene when back-winding for 



PACE 121 




In "Star and Garter," currently playing on 
Broadway to jammed houses, Georgia Sothern 
introduced her startling and novel presenta- 
tion— "the hottest dance that ever came out of 
the South," says Producer Mike Todd. Film Tbeatarettes has filmed 
this sensational number, and you can now see it in your own home. 
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HOME MOVI ES 



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PAGE 122 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



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a dissolve or other effect is to follow. 

Construction of the back-wind key 
and necessary parts are fully described 
in the diagrams in Fig. 6. Some machine 
work is necessary but most amateurs 
will find this work still available espe- 
cially among automobile repair and 
small machine shops. 

To locate position for hole to be 
drilled in camera case cover for the key, 
I employed the same method as described 
tor the counter. The film sprocket was 
first drilled to take two small pins, as 
shown at E, Fig. 5, and a metal pin tem- 
porarily inserted half-way into one of 
the holes. In this position, it scribed a 
circle inside the cover, as sprocket was 
rotated. The center of this circle was 
calculated and the hole for the key 
bushing drilled. The bush ng assembly, 
shown in Fig. 6, was then fitted into 
place, followed by the key and its ac- 
companying parts. 



him unbuttoning and taking off his 
shirt. Fadeout as Mother exits. 

1 5. Closeup of little girl's hand ring- 
ing door bell. 

16. Med. Shot — exterior of home. 
Door opens and Sonny's mother admits 
several boys and girls who have gath- 
ered there. Each bears a gift. 

From this point on, choice of scenes 
rests with the filmer. It is suggested that 
each guest be pictured in closeup with 
sonny as he or she places a gift in his 
hands. Then follow these shots with 
other closeups of the gifts after packages 
have been opened. 

The various games should be pic- 
tured in medium and closeup shots, al- 
tered as necessary, without attempting 
to pose or direct the children. 

After the game* will come shots of 
Sonny and guests seated around the par- 
ty table and closeups of Sonny extin- 
guishing the candles on his birthday 
cake and making the first cut into it. 
A necessary final shot is that of Sonny 
finishing his ice cream and looking over 
the table and around to each of his 
guests to see if there is any ice cream 
left. 

Lighting the party scenes will present 
no problem if there's a chandelier over 
the table in which several photofloods 
may be placed for the lighting. If pos- 
sible, place reflectors behind each of the 
photofloods to gain the maximum vol- 
ume of light. Photofloods in clamp re- 
flectors attached to tripod standards or 
backs of chairs will furnish adequate 
side and foreground illumination. 

Here's a suggested "twist" to end the 
film. Following scenes showing Sonny 



My camera is fitted with a small 
spring clip which slides into each 
sprocket hole as the film travels through 
the camera. This tends to protect 
against camera losing film loop. This 
feature is not on all model K's and 
therefore may not trouble other owners 
of this camera. To successfully back 
wind, therefore, I had to fashion a gad- 
get to release this clip during back- 
winding operations. The gadget is 
shown at F, Fig. 6, with its attendant 
operating spring G. In operation, it 
works as follows: as I press in the back- 
wind key, it pushes against the triangu- 
lar spring G which forces the pin F to 
release the sprocket-hole clip. 

(Interested readers who wish to con- 
struct these two gadgets for their cam- 
eras, may write to Arthur Sharp should 
further details be desired. Address him 
ai 1624 Smith St., Centredale, R. I. 
—Ed.) 



bidding last of his guests goodbye, film 
a closeup of Sonny turning suddenly 
and looking back toward the house. Cut 
to a medium shot showing him running 
back to the house and entering the 
door. Then film the closing sequence as 
follows: 

Med. Shot — interior of living room. 
Sonny slams door behind him and rushes 
past camera, bent for the kitchen. 

Closeup — Sonny's running feet dis- 
arranges a small rug, almost trips him- 
self. 

Med. Shot — Sonny, running, exits 
through door to kitchen. 

Med. Shot — interior of kitchen. Re- 
frigerator in foreground. Sonny dashes 
into scene. Throws open refrigerator 
door. Excitedly searches refrigerator 
shelves. Locates plate on which is left- 
over portion of ice cream. Looks about 
room, cautiously takes out ice cream and 
closes door. Sits down on floor (camera 
moves to follow him) and begins to eat. 

Closeup — Kitchen door leading to 
dining room. Camera set up in position 
occupied in previous scene by Sonny, 
and pointing up toward door. Door 
slowly opens part way, revealing moth- 
er cautiously peering in at Sonny. She 
smiles knowingly. 

Back to scene showing Sonny eat- 
ing dish of ice cream. 

Back to preceding scene. Mother, 
smiling, closes door softly. Fade out. 

The End. 




Planning, Mirthday, 3dm . . . 



Continued from Page ;oj 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PAGE 123 



cAmateur£ 3ilm ZJkriller . • . 



• Continued from Page 1 10 

cause the producer successfully balanced 
the picture's demands with available re- 
sources. Thrills were frequently injected 
into the plot that required little or no 
drain on the treasury. The amazing 
acrobatics of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., 
that made his early day movies success- 
ful, inspired Adventure's staff to work 
ai many stunts into "The Blacfc Rider" 
as they could perform themselves or 
could effect by means of camera trick- 
ery. An accompanying production still 
shows Adventure's stunt man executing 
a cliff jump in the climactic chase se- 
quence of the picture. 

"The Black Rider," running three 
reels in 16mm. black and white, is a 
story of a daring bandit who operates 
masked and robed in black. Robbing a 
small town bank, he successfully es- 
capes leaving a trail of dead men in his 
wake who attempted to intercept him 
on way to his hideout. The sheriff and 
hi:, posse get into action, trap the Black 
Rider after an interesting fight and 
chase sequence between posse and the 
Rider's henchmen. 

The production is skillfully handled 



from beginning to end. Indeed it is the 
eoual, save for lack of sound and dia- 
logue, of many western pictures coming 
out of Hollywood today. Every member 
of the amateur cast turns in a creditable 
performance which gives the picture the 
note of authenticity so often lacking in 
many amateur productions. We presume 
much of the credit for the acting is 
due producer Louis McMahon who evi- 
dently rehearsed every scene with infi- 
nite care before placing it before the 
camera. This being true, here is a man 
that will bear watching by Hollywood. 

The photography is so good, one for- 
gets he's looking at an amateur pro- 
duction. Possibly editing had much to 
do with this, for the editing chore is 
one of the best amateur jobs ever oc- 
corded an amateur picture. 

Music plays an important part in ex- 
hibiting this picture. For synchronized 
sound effects, a home-made dual turn- 
table and amplifier is used. Music was 
chosen for the score that had ear appeal 
as well as a mood complimentary to the 
picture. The group, all lovers of sym- 
phonic music, discovered that many of 



SIGNAL CORPS WANTS 
CINE EQUIPMENT 



► Photographic amateurs have been re- 
quested to sell their motion-picture equip- 
ment to the Signal Corps, Army Services 
of Supply. This equipment is needed 
both for training purposes and opera- 
tional use, the War Department an- 
nounced today. 

The Signal Corps seeks to purchase 
motion picture cameras, animation cam- 
eras, projectors, sound reproducing equip- 
ment, printers, and film examining ma- 
chines for both 1 6mm. and 55 mm. mo- 
tion picture film and film strips. High- 
speed still cameras will be purchased. 
Also desired are certain high quality ex- 
posure meters, filters, tripods and ferro- 
type plates. 

Used equipment will be purchased if 
it is in perfect operating condition or if 
it can readily be restored to such condi- 
tion. The price paid for each item will be 
set by a Signal Corps inspector. Persons 
in possession of the desired equipment 
who wish to sell it for the use of the 
Army are invited to send a brief de- 
scription, including name of manufac- 
turer and model type, to Captain James 
C. Short at the Philadelphia Signal Corps 
Procurement District, 5000 Wissahickon 
Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The complete list of the desired 16mm. 
equipment follows: 

Motion picture camera, 16mm. com- 
plete with 25mm. f/1.9 lens, one z l /i' 
f/2.7 lens, 1 lens adapter, 1 tripod, one 
K-2, one G and one 25 filter for each 



lens, and 1 carrying case. Eastman Cine- 
Kodak Special. 

Bell and Howell Filmo Model 70-DA, 
16mm. camera motion picture. 

Motion picture camera, 16mm. com- 
plete with 1 f/1.9 lens, and combina- 
tion carrying case. Eastman Magazine 
Cine-Kodak 16mm. m.p. camera. 

Camera, Magazine, model 141-A, 
equipped with a 1" f/2.7 lens and with 
a sheath case. Bell and Howell Company. 

1 6mm. sound on film projector, with 
projection lamp having minimum 750 
watts, and having capacity to take up 
to 1200 ft. reels, complete with neces- 
sary accessory for the proper projection 
of motion pictures and reproduction of 
sound, Bell and Howell Commercial, 
Academy, or Utility model. 

Projector, 16mm., sound, with acces- 
sories, RCA Projector Model PG-200. 

Projector, 16mm. sound, with acces- 
sories, Ampro Corporation Model YSA. 

Projector, 16mm., sound with acces- 
sories, Phono-Films Model XC with ac- 
cessories. 

Printer, motion picture, optical reduc- 
tion, sound 35 mm. to 1 6mm. 

Printer, semi-automatic, 16mm., mo- 
tion picture, } way continuous Bell and 
Howell Model D. 

Exposure Meters: Weston Master No. 
715; Weston Master No. 720; Weston 
Jr.; and General Electric Models Nos. 
4S or 49. 




Going to war or 
workin' days . . . 
playin' with lenses no long- 
er pays . . . then pack the stuff up right away 
... off to Bass this very day . . . you get's your 
check by fastest mail ... in fact we're, never 
known to fail . . . we'll satisfy or know just 
why . . . come on old sport . . . give us a try. 

Charles Bass 

PRESIDENT 
• Headquarters for new and used 
FILMO, BOLEX, REVERE, CINE KO- 
DAK AND CINE KODAK SPECIALS 
AND PROJECTORS 

Write Dept. HM 




CLOSEOUT! 
h- BEADED SCREEN $-93 

22" x 30" EASEL MODEL ■ 

These beaded screens are factory irregulars with only 
slight imperfections. Will not impair projection — comes 
complete with easel. DuPont Cloth and wide angle heads 
make this screen a truly remarkable value. Screen surface 
identical to screens now selling for many times our "close- 
out price." Wire easel keeps screen firm and taut as it 
stands erect on any plane surface. 

SPECIALS — 16mm. Silent and Sound Film 

ONLY LIMITED QUANTITIES ON HAND ! 

100' (Silent) Life of Edward (Prince of Wales $ .89 

800' (Sound) Educational — Work Pays America 10.50 

500' (Sound) America Learns To Play 8.50 

500' (Sound) Magic Caves 8.50 

400' (Sound) Safe Guarding Military Information 6.50 
300' (Sound) Color Film— New England by Auto... 10.00 
Also many other bargains in 16mm Sound and 8mm- 16mm 
Silent Film. Write today for FREE Bargain List. 

SUPERIOR BULK FILM CO. 

188 W. Randolph St. Dept. A-12 Chicago. III. 




8mm.- 1 4mm. -35mm. 

KODACH ROME 

OF THE BEAUTIFUL 

CAVERNS 
of L U R A Y 



This extremely Interesting and most unusual film 
will make a valuable addition to your film library. 

36 • 2x2 KODACHROME SLIDES — 4 for $ 1.00 

100 Ft. 16mm. KODACHROME P P 10.00 
50 Ft. 16mm. KODACHROME 0 A 6.00 
50 Ft. 6mm. KODACHROME S I 6.00 

28 Ft. 8mm. KODACHROME T D 3.50 

LURAY CAVERNS, Bx. 1 076. Luray, Va. 



Distinctive TITLES 
and expert EDITING 

For the Amateur and Professional 
16HrM. — 8JfM. 
Black and White. Tinted and Kodaehrome 

Write for our new illustrated catalog 
STAHL EDITING & TITLING SERVICE 
33 West 42nd Street New York. N. Y. 



8 ENLARGED «| ^\ REDUCED f\ 
TO lb TO 8 

BLACK AND WHITE AND KODACHROME 

CEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A MERCHANDISE MART 
CHICAGO 



PACE 124 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



Now it's panchromatic! 

ESO-F 

Our newest 8mm. speed film, rated 
_ Weston 24-2(1 for the low urlre of $2.00 

per roll; 3 rolls for $5.70. postpaid. We will ship c.o.d. 
. . . For all double 8mm camera!. Fast enough for those late 
afternoon shots, yet rljiht for bright days, too! Prlee in- 
cludes spooling, processing and return postage. (We are 
licensed by the Eastman Kodak Company to spool and pro- 
css double 8mm. motion picture film.) 

ESO-S PICTURES 

"QUALITY 8MM. SERVICE" 
3945 Central Street Kansas City, Missouri 



S-T-R-E-T-C-H your film — use 



GARMUR 

Cable 
Release 




ADAPTOR 




No film wasted by jarring: remote control simplifies 
single frame exposures; adaptor easily attached and 
detached: no interference with other camera functions. 
Cable NOT included. 

MODELS: Revere 88, Filmo Companion and Sportster. 
PRICE: $1.00 plus tax in Calif. (If you send 
stamps, please send WAR SAVINGS STAMPS..) 

Prn/Jii/-fc p O. 6073 Metropolitan 

fearmur Products sta Los An!)eles Callf 

Alto: MATUS CAMERA SUPPLY COMPANY 
9208 Wllthlre Boulevard Los Angeles. Calif. 



PB MOVIE FILTER KIT FOR COLORFILM 

for REVERE CAMERAS 

Including I Scrow-ln-Sunshado, I Hat* Flltor, 
I Typo A Filter, I Pouch, «A 75 

eomploto «* 

From All Leading Camera Dealeri or 

PONDER & BEST 

till 80. GRAND AVE., LOS ANQELE8, CALIF. 



WARTIME PHOTOGRAPHY 




— while preparing for sound future ca- 
reers! Trained men and women photog- 
raphers are needed now more than ever 
before. Qualify at largest, oldest school that has trained 
many of today's most successful photographers. Over 450 
N. Y. I. trained men winning promotion, higher pay in 
photo divisions of Armed Service. Resident or home 
study courses. Big FREE book gives details. 

N. Y. INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
Dept. 114, 10 W. 33 St., New York, N. Y. 



Kodachrome 

MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 

GIO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A Merchandise Mart, Chicago 



NEW GLAMOUR NEWSREEL 

No. 4 

Majorettes, Glamour Girls, Regular 50 ft. 8mm. 
(2.00 special $1.00; 100 ft. 16mm. Regularly $4.00 
special $2.50. Sample cut and other listings 10c. 
Selected Sound Films 16mm. 

GRIFFIN FILM CO. 

Ithaca, N. Y. Dept. HM P. O. Box 21 




I* FILM 



RENTAL 
LIBRARY 



Comedies, Musicals, Religious, Travel, 
Cartoons, Industrials. War! List free! 
Cameras — Projectors Bought — Sold ! 
Trades! Time Payments. For film cat- 
ilog, give projector size and model. 



55 W. 48th St., N. Y. (Radio City) 



Tschaikowsky's orchestral works pro- 
vide aural excitement for the type of 
pictures they make for the screen. In 
scoring "The Black Rider" a heavy, 
thematic music was desired, and Franz 
Liszt's "Faust Symphony" was found 
most appropriate. This symphony, with 
its many variations, is particularly em- 
phasized in crescendos whenever the 
ominous "Black Rider" appears in the 
picture. 

"The Black Rider" as well as four 
other films completed by Adventure Pic- 
tures are frequently featured on pro- 
grams of the Passaic Y. M. C. A. Boy's 
Club, Chamber of Commerce, and other 
organizations, which further testifies 
to the extraordinary qualities of Adven- 
ture's amateur productions. 

Practice 

Project . . . 

• Continued from Page 106 

therefore this scene required a total of 
io seconds. 

In taking your unloaded camera afield 
in this filming practice project, train 
the viewfinder on a variety of scenes 
and hold the starting button down just 
long enough to capture sufficient action 
or detail so it will "register" on the 
screen. Closeups of inanimate objects 
require less screening time than closeups 
of an interesting animate object or one 
of complex design. A medium shot in a 
dramatic playlet may require more foot- 
age than a similar shot in a scenic film. 
The same applies to long shots. 

By training oneself to carefully con- 
sider the ultimate screening time of each 
scene, eventually it will become second 
nature to allow just the right amount 
of footage for each shot. As a result, 
editing pictures will become less ardu- 
ous and the amateur will be money 
ahead in film saved. 

Continuity, 3dea* 
Jn Odd Shot* 

• Continued from Page 112 

finds her purse bulging with winner's 
gold. The inevitable result is that she 
indulges in lavish spending for new 
clothes, takes a plane trip "back home," 
there to enjoy a happy holiday with 
family and friends. During the merri- 
ment a glass crashes to the floor and 
this brings the dreamer back to reality 
and her chores at the typewriter. 

It became necessary for Shandler to 
film only the opening and closing se- 
quences of scenes showing the secretary 
at her typewriter, and the double-ex- 
posed montage picturing money passing 
freely over scenes of the secretary buy- 
ing her wardrobe. Frame enlargements 



of these as well as other scenes appear 
at the beginning of this article. 

"The shot conveying the spending 
of money," says Shandler, "was made 
with the aid of a round can — the kind 
in which grocers sell bulk pop corn. 
This was rigged up with a handle and 
'prop' dollar bills were pasted around 
its surface which had been painted dull 
black. Turning the drum, I filmed 2j 
feet of this, then wound back the film 
and prepared to superimpose on this 
footage, the dress shop scenes. 

"We found a cooperative dress shop 
proprietor who readily agreed to let us 
set up lights and shoot the needed scenes 
and he graciously provided one of his 
salesgirls to 'act' as the clerk while my 
wife went through the business of mak- 
ing purchases." 

Perhaps you, too, have a collection of 
odd shots that could be transformed 
into an amusing continuity, an activity 
that would keep you alert with your 
hobby. If you have, why not get them 
out tonight and screen them? Using a 
little imagination, it is not impossible 
that you can develop one or more good 
story ideas that need but a few tie-in 
shots to complete the continuity — shots 
which can be made with a minimum of 
effort and film. 

cAmateur 3ilm 

Preview* . . . 

• Continued from Page 102 

and his picture easily deserves the two- 
star merit leader awarded it. 

It Happened One Night" is a 
200-foot 8mm. Kodachrome movie pro- 
duced by C. A. Graves of Denver, Col- 
orado. It pictures a woman cinebug pre- 
paring a film for entry in a club contest. 
Obviously it is one of those productions 
that had its start in a series of random 
scenic shots made on a vacation trip, 
and the sequences showing picture be- 
ing prepared for the contest were 
thoughtfully contrived to mould the 
collection of scenes into an interesting 
continuity. 

In the beginning the woman is pic- 
tured reading the contest notice, then 
starting out to shoot scenes for her pro- 
posed contest entry. Thereafter follows 
numerous shots of various scenic spots 
in Colorado. 

Later the woman is seen working far 
into the wee hours of the morning at 
her editing board putting her "epic" to- 
gether. The job completed, she goes to 
bed and dreams her picture wins first 
prize. 

While a glaring fault is the unsteady 
camera apparent in most of the scenic 
shots, this is counterbalanced somewhat 
by fine camera work in the interior se- 



HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 



PACE 125 



For Your Son or Daughter 



HOLLYWOOD STARS 

autographed photos 



5" x 7" (suitable for framing) 

Clark Gable, Roy Rogers, Gary Cooper, Joan Fon- 
taine, Bing Crosby, Rita Hayworth, Charles Boyer, 
Humphrey Bogart, Joe E. Brown, John Boxles, Jack 
Carson, Lana Turner, Linda Darnell, Bill Elliott, Errol 
Flynn, Cary Grant, William Holden, Louis Hayword, 
Bob Hope, Arthur Lake, Joan Leslie, Robert Mont- 
gomery, Edward O'Brien, Tyrone Power, Mickey 
Rooney, Tex Ritter, Rosalind Russell, Larry Simms, 
Randolph Scott, Charles Starrett, Sally Wadsworth, 
Loretta Young. 

25c apiece — 5 for $1.00 

HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 

6408 Selma Hollywood, Calif. 



TITLE CENTERING GUIDES 

for all popular makes of 8mm. and 16mm. 
cameras 

IN PAMPHLET FORM . . . . 10c EACH 
Now ready for the following cameras: 

Revere 8mm. (All models) — 8mm. Magazine 
Cine Kodak — Single-lens 8mm. Filmo— -8mm. 
Turret Filmo, 8mm. Cine Kodaks 20, 25 and 
iO — 8mm. Keystone — 16mm. Cine Kodak K — 
16mm. Model 70 Filmos — 121 Filmo — 141 
Filmo — Cine Kodak E — Cine Kodak K — 16mm. 
Victor — 16mm. Keystone, Models A3, A7 
and Bl. ■* 
Be Sure to Specify Make and Model and 
Camera When Ordering. 

HOME MOVIES MAGAZINE 

6060 Sunset Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



S7t_ nn I TO £V£PY 




Get this FREE BOOK! Every 
Movie fan should have it. Chuck 
full with choicest bargains you 
ever saw. Daylight Leading Movie 
film as low as $1 per roll, pro- 
cessing included. Also bulk film, 
and dozens of bargains in acces- 
sories, screens, reels, titlers. etc. 

Contains BIG NEW LIST 166 film subjects, glam- 
our films, cartoons, westerns, historical, adven- 
ture and sports films for 8mm. and 16mm. Write 
today. Your name on postcard brings this handy 
book by return mail FREE! 

ESSCO FILM PRODUCTS 
3827 Archer Ave. Dept. H-4 Chicago 



EVERY 8MM. FAN WANTS 

CINE EXTENAR 

Ifj the new WIDE ANGLE 
lens that every cine fan 
needs to catch the whole 
picture. Simply screws 
over regular 8mm. lens, 
providing identical focus 
and definition plus a WIDE 
ANGLE. $27.50 
FOR FULL PARTICULARS. WRITE TODAY 

CAMERA SPECIALTY CO. 

48 West 29th Street New York City 




10PHOTOS25 e 

*"OF GHOST TOWN 

MO*T UNIQUE SPOT IN SO. CALIFORNIA 

0HO8T TOWN 'PITCHUR GALLERY' 

LOCATED AT K NOTTS' BERRY PLACE 
■UENA PARK. CALIFORNIA 



PROTECT FILMS 



vapJQlrate 

ASK TOUR DEALER OR PHOTOFIN1SHER 
VAPORATECO.. INC.' BELL & HOWELL CO. 
130 W. 46th St. 1801 Larchmont, Chicago 
New York City 716 N. Labrea, Hollywood 



AGAINST 
CLIMATE. 
SCRATCH- 
ES. STAINS. 
FINGER- 
MARKS-THE 
WAY T H t 
U. S. GOV- 
ERNMENT 
AND THE 
HOLLY- 
WOOD PRO- 
DUCERS DO 



quences that involved single frame cam- 
era action and split stage photography. 
The double-exposed scene showing the 
woman's dream was exceedingly well 
executed. Good titling is another 
highlight. A two-star merit leader was 
also awarded this film. 



ZJke Reader 

Speak* . . . 

• Continued from Page loo 

Speaks, January 1943 issue. I would like 
tc contact 8mm. amateurs at or residing 
near Camp Swift, Texas or Camp Crow- 
der, Missouri; also at Fort Lawton, 
Washington — Houard Buck, West Lib- 
erty, Ohio. 

Focusing Discovery 

Sirs: The following may be of inter- 
est to your readers: I have a 16mm. 
Bolex equipped with wide angle, one-in., 
and three-in. telephoto lenses. I find the 
telephoto an excellent lens for title work 
when using Craig letters on a black 
background at about ten feet. This pro- 
duces a sharp title as the telephoto can 
be focused sharply through the critical 
viewfinder. 

Mine is not a high-priced telephoto, 
but it gives good results. One fault I 
found with it is in the footage calibra- 
tions — 50 ft. is infinity according to 
calibration markings. But when I set the 
lens on the 50-ft. mark and shoot some 
distant object, a distinct halo effect re- 
sults in center of the picture. 

This caused me to experiment. I 
made a test, focusing lens on objects at 
various distances. I found that calibra- 
tions on the lens were not true, that act- 
ually the 2 5 -ft. mark was equivalent 
to infinity. All pictures taken at that 
setting are sharp and clear, minus the 
halo. 

It is interesting to note that pictures 
made with lens set at the various focus- 
ing marks up to 25 feet are accurate by 
the tape. Possibly other camera owners 
have experienced this same trouble and 
corrected the fault as I did. — Dick 
Habne, Webster City, la. 

Wants N. Y. Scenes 

Gentlemen: I would like to contact 
some movie fan in New York who could 
furnish me with some scenes in 8 milli- 
meter Kodachrome of New York City. 
If they will write to me first, I'll give 
further particulars. — R. L. Miller, 1991 
Nelauood Rd., East Cleveland, O. 




FOR ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS! 

* Harrison CINE KIT 




4 FILTERS and DUAL-SNAP SHADE TO MEET 
ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS— both Kodachrome 
and Black and White. 

The new Harrison CINEKIT contains a special A«ro 
Lock Ring, a Dual-Snap Aluminum Sunshade, and the 
following de luie Durallne Fllteri: YL-6. GY-4. 
RD-4. and GR-4. Case Is of durable 5-oz. Elkhlde. 
felt lined. $6.95 and up. 



(If desired, Kodachrome users 
may substitute a C-4 and 
HAZE niter for any two of 

the abore. 



Write for Free 
Illustrated Foliar 
Today 



HARRISON & HARRISON 

OPTICAL ENGINEERS 
8351 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



WORLD'S 
GREATEST SHOW 
RENTAL LIBRARY 

NOW! You can see all of latest WAR 
and CURRENT EVENTS released by 
CASTLE and other producers, with 
our new ECONOMICAL RENTAL 
PLAN. Write for details. 

KENWOOD FILMS 

818 E. 47th St. Chicago, III. 



8mm. - 16mm. 
Hollywood Ambertint Film 

Excellent Outdoor Film Wide Latitude 

25 Ft. Dbl. 8, $1.25 100 Ft. 16, $2.50 

including machine processing 

HOLLYWOODLAND STUDIOS 

9320 CALIFORNIA AVE. SOUTH GATE, CALIF. 
Despite Rumors Plenty of Film Available 



Notice to Movie Fans 

If you take movies (8mm or 16mm) you simply cannot 
afford to be without a Free copy of the latest Photo Bar- 
gain Book now being distributed throughout the U. S. 
Lists all the best moving picture equipment from all 
the leading manufacturers, describes them. The prices 
save you money in many cases. You'll find the latest 
in lenses, screens, meters, projectors, cameras, film, 
titlers, editing outfits, tripods, books on editing, 
titling, etc. This Banrain Book is invaluable to you as 
an equipment REFERENCE book. Don't wait a day 
longer to send for your FTee copy. Write us now. 

CENTRAL CAMERA COMPANY 
230 S. Wabash Dept. D-9 Chicago, Illinois 



16mm SOUND on Film 

Recording Studio and Editing Facilities 
BERNDT-MAURER RECORDER 

GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

995-A Merchandise Mart CHICAGO 



i6mm KODACHROME 2x2 

MOVIES WI*#*wni\\/IYl t SUOES 

"MOOSE": 125'. $18.75. "SOARING SEAGULLS": 
25 ft.. $3.75. 34 ft.. $5.00. "GOLDEN -MANTLED 
GROUND SQUIRREL": 50 ft.. $7.50. "ROBIN'S 
NEST": 34 ft.. $5. "THE END." titles: 3 for $1. 
With fade-out. 50c each. Other subjects: Yosemite: 
The Blooming Desert: San Francisco; The Canadian 
Rockies; WUdf lowers: at rate of 18c per foot — any 
length. (Write for Information on SLIDES) 

GUY D. H ASELTON 
7936 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood 



PACE 126 HOME MOVIES FOR APRIL 

CLASSIFIED • ADVERTISING; 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: Wc a'e busy filling orders for hard- 
to get items. 

USED 8MM. CAMERAS 

Keystone Model K-8. F:3.S lens. $23.50. 
Revere Turret Model 99. F:2.5 fired focus, and 
Teletar Tele. case. $82. SC. 

USED I6MM. CAMERAS 
Keystone Mode! A-3. F:3.5 lens. $31.50. 
Cine Kodak Model E. F:3.5 lens. $37.50. 
Keystone Model A 7. I" F:2.7 fixed focus lens, 
$39.50. 

Bell & Ho*ell Filmo 70A. Cooke F-.3.5 lens and case. 
$47.50. 

Cell & Howell 121. I" F:2.7 fixed focos Cooke, case. 
$57.50. 

Cine Kodak Model B. interchangeable lenses, fitted 
with F:l.9 lens. $59.50. 

Bell & Howell Model 75. F:2.7 Cooke fixed, and 
case, $40.00. 

Cine Kodak Model E, F: 1 .9 Kodak Anastigmat. 
$64.50. 

Victor 3 Turret, F:3.5 lens focusing mount. $67.50. 

Simplex Pockette, with Kodak Anastigmat F: 1 .9, 
case. $69.50. 

Cine Kodak Model K. F:l.9 lens. $72.50. 

Victor Model 3 Turret. 15mm. Wollensak fixed focus 
F:2.7 I" Wollensak F:2.7, 2" Wollensak F:3.5 and 
case, $125.00. 

V : ctor Model 5. critical focuser, with I" Cooke 
F.3.5 fixed focus. I" Wollensak F:l.5 focusing 
mount, 3" Berthiot Tele. F:3.5. case. $157.50. 

LENSES 

Hard-to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focal lengths up 
to 6" including Cooke, Hugo Meyer, Dallmeyer 
and complete stock of new Wollensak lenses 
from wide angle to 6". Write for quotations. 

DESIRABLE ACCESSORIES 

Bell & Howell Character Title Writer, latest model, 
with case, $25.00: old model. $15.00. 

Universal Titlers. made of aluminum, complete with 
magnifying lette'S. models for all standard cam- 
eras, each. $6.95. 

Cinematog'apher's Handbook and Reference Guide 

ir stock, $3.50. 
American Photographic Exposure Computer, $ 1 .00. 
The Camera Photo Pocket Guide. $1.00. 

We buy 'em, sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 
stocks of new Cine Equipment, all makes. Send 
for Bass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment 
up to date. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY. Dept. HC. 179 W. 
Madison St.. Chicago. Illinois. 



• SIEMENS HALSKE 8mm. f/2.5 focuses to 18", 
self loading cartridge camera ($175 new) near new 
condition, $127.50 with case. EXAKTA Vestpocket 
f/2.5 lens with case and custom synchronizer equip- 
ment, $157.50. CONTAX III Zeiss f/I.S lens, brand 
new condition with eveready case, sunshade and 
Kodachrome regular indoor filter. Meter marked. 
$•05. Guaranteed perfect. A. NOLL. 9014 Larke 
Ellen Circle, Los Angeles. Calif. 



• I6MM. SILENT PROJECTOR— 750 watt Standard 
Projector with following features: 2" color-corrected 
lens, motor rewind, runs backward or forward, 
rheostat speed control, pilot light, removable film 
gate and easy-tilt control. Price $65.00. BOX 444, 
Home Movies Magazine, 6060 Sunset Blvd.. Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



• Make vour own 8-l6mm. action-filmviewer editor. 
Easy. No shutter or moving parts — film appears as 
motion pictures. Send $1.00 today for blue print and 
instructions. BUCKLEY BROS.. 1188 Broadview Ave., 
Cclumbus, Ohio. 



• HOLLYWOOD-type viewers, while they last, 25c 
each. Limit four. PARK CAMERA EXCHANGE. 6043 
Pacific Blvd.. Huntington Park, Calif. 



• Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 

Turn it into cash with a Home Movies 
classified ad! 

RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing date, 
10th of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



WANTED 



• WANTED— Late model Cine Special, I" f/1.9 
lens, telephoto wide angle lens, case, extra mag- 
azine or other accessories. Answer full details. 
Cash. A. R. CARUCCI, 422 E. 4th St., Wilmington, 
Del. Phone 4-7604. 



• WANTED — cameras, projectors, etc. Top prices 
paid. Send description and price asked. PARK 
CAMERA EXCHANGE. 6043 Pacific Blvd.. Hunting 
ton Park, Calif. 



• WANTED — used equipment. Bargain list on 
request. PETERS. 41 B So. 4th St.. Allentown. Penna. 



• CINE Special or Eyemo camera in good condi- 
tion for cash. Write ROSE DOYLE 666 West End 
Ave.. N. Y. C. 



• 8MM. 500 watt movie projector in good condi- 
tion. Write W. ALDEN, 300 W. 93rd St.. N. Y. C. 



HELP WANTED 



DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER 

wanted with practical experience in 8 and 16mm. 
cameras and projectors. Permanent employment 
with large Chicago manufacturer now engaged in 
100% war work, with assured post war production. 
Excellent opportunity and substantial salary for 
right man. In first letter give age. experience, edu- 
cation, present employment and other qualifications. 
All correspondence held in strictest confidence. Our 
organization knows of this ad. Box 334, Home 
Movies, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



FILM RELEASES 



• WORLD S greatest 16mm. sound-on-film shorts 
with all the leading name bands and stars, includ- 
ing Gene Krupa. Tony Pastor. Will Bradley, Tommy 
Reynolds. Ray Kinney, Cab Calloway. Johnny Mess 
ner, Charlie Spivak, Alvino Rey. Mitchel Ayres, 
Willie Howard, Lanny Ross, Gus Van, Barry Wood. 
King's Men. Borrah Minnevich, Hoosier Hot Shots. 
$7.50 per reel. State your choice. MULTI PRISES. 
Box 1125. Waterbury. Conn. 



• I6MM. SOUND Film Bargains! Large library of 
features and shorts being liquidated. All films new 
or like new. Send stamp for list. Act fast! They 
won t stay long. TED KRUGER. 4928 Ella St.. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 



• EXCHANGE your 16mm. full subjects used or 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm. -16mm. subjects, 
cartoons, comedies. ABBE, 1265 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



• MONEYMAKER1 "The Worlds Greatest Passion 
Play." 16mm. and 35mm. Specify sound or silent. 
Rent or purchase. Superior than Oberamme'gau- 
play. HEMENWAY FILM CO., 33-A Melrose St., 
Boston, Mass. 



• 8-I6MM. SILENT and sound films. Cameras end 
projectors. Bought, sold, traded. Free Lists, BOBS. 
154 East 47th St., N. Y. C. 



FILM RELEASES 



• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged bought 
sold, rented Bargains olways. New Free lilts. 
FRANK LANE, 5 Little Bldg.. Boston. Mass. 



• SALE— Rental — Exchange: Latest film releases. AM 
purchases guaranteed. Send stamp for free cata- 
logues. BAILEY FILMS. 1651 Cosmo, Hollywood 
Calif. 



• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New-used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins REIDEL FILMS, 
Dept. HM-443. 3207 Joslyn Rd.. Cleveland. Ohio. 



• AMERICA'S largest 8mm. rental library. Free 
catalog lists hundreds of subjects. Films exchanged. 
GARY FILMS. 369 East 55th. Brooklyn. N. Y. 



• COMPLETE 16mm. sound subjects, perfect. $5.75. 
Odd sound reels, $2.00. All sizes film bought sold, 
exchanged. Catalogues, sample film, 10c. INTER- 
NATIONAL. 2120 Straus. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



KODACHROME FILM RELEASES 



• KODACHROME Travel Films— latest releases 
now available for distribution in 6 and 16mm. Dime 
will bring color sample and listings. KENWOOD 
FILMS. 818 E. 47th St.. Chicago, III. 



FILMS FOR EXCHANGE 



• BUY More Bonds and yet enjoy Better Films 
by adopting our inexpensive exchange plan: Silent 
pictures, $1.00 reel; sound $2.00. Also sell. Free 
catalogue. Selected sound program, reasonable 
rentals. Send for Victory B Bulletin. BETTER FILMS. 
742 New Lots Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



PROCESSING SERVICE 



• MOTION picture processing. 100' 16mm.. 75c 

50 16mm.. 50c: 25' 8/8mm.. 35c: 25' 8mm.. 25c: 

RITTER FILM SERVICE 629 Lyman Ave. Oak 

Park III. 



DUPLICATING SERVICE 



• $1.25 PAYS for a fifty-foot 8mm. duplicate of 
your favorite reel. Our Monocolor duplicates will 
preserve those fading Kodachrome movies. Partic- 
ulars. ESO-S PICTURES. 3945 Central. Kansas City. 

Missouri. 



TITLING 



• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit — Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16". 18", 20", 24", 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal for 
general close-up photographv. Complete kit $3.00. 
Separate lenses. 60c each. Also available in 6", 8". 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO.. 3221 So. 
Figueroa St.. Los Angeles, Calif. 



• TITLE your own films. This complete, illustrated 
book tells how. Shows how to build your own titler; 
how to develop positive titles: how to make trick 
titles, etc. Title lettering and composition explained. 
Replete with charts and tables on diopters, field 
areas, etc. Send $1.00 today for HOW TO TITLE 
HOME MOVIES written by George Cushman. VER 
HALEN PUBLICATIONS. 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



• STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have a model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
printed in authentic legal manner, 50 for 25c (coin) 
postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATI IONS 6060 Sunset 
Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



TITLES zl 



By EDMUND TURNER 




Ct AY ART 



HESE title cards, which are a regular feature of Home Movies each 
month, are designed especially for use with typewriter titles or any 
home-made titler that will photograph at a distance of 8 inches. 
Save all of them for future use. Cut them out and paste on l"*}' 
file cards, using rubber cement. 




— =S TT" 



m Ha j?*^ 



HOW'S YOUR 




B&H RECONDITIONING SERVICE PUTS IT IN FACTORY-NEW CONDITION 



You realize that every projector that we can possibly build today 
must go to the United States Government for service with the 
armed forces. That means no new projectors for civilians until 
the boys come marching home. Meanwhile — let B&H Recon- 
ditioning Service put your Filmo silent or Filmosound Projector 
in factory-new condition. 

The work will be done by our own factory-trained technicians 
who know every sprocket, gear, bearing, lamp, and lens in 
your machine and just exactly how it should be adjusted to 
make the projector function at peak efficiency. The same metic- 

★ * * * ★ 

Team your projector with the FILMOSOUND 
LIBRARY to help speed Victory . . . 

You and your projector, teamed with the Filmosound Library, can 
render your country invaluable wartime service. The Filmosound Li- 
brary, always one of the most comprehensive sources of films, today 
offers a selection that eclipses anything we have ever before been able 
to achieve — and new films are being added almost daily. 

Many of these are pictures that every American should see. Morale is 
the "armament of the mind" — and when your friends and neighbors see 
some of these films that bring home to them the grim, stark realities of 
the job that American fighting men and their allies must finish before 
Victory can be ours, less mental energy will be wasted on the trivialities 
of coffee and shoe rationing — and more of it focused on real war effort. 

Give a home movie party with a greater objective than entertainment. 
Show pictures like "Russia Strikes Back". .."Yanks Invade Africa". .."U.S. 
Carrier Fights for Life" ... or "Divide and Conquer," an OWI release, that 
portrays how the theories of the "master race" are expressed in atrocious 
brutalities. These — and many other films are available to you through 
your dealer and the Filmosound Library, on a purchase or rental basis. 

Bell & Howell Company, Chicago: NewYork; Hollywood: Washington. O.C.: London Est. 1907 

"E" FOR EXCELLENCE— how the Army-Navy Award for 
extraordinary performance is won and presented is shown by 
this one-reel sound him. Service charge 50c. 

REMEMBER PLEASE -don't throw away old lampi. 
A new lamp can be supplied you only when the 
burned-out lamp if turned in. 




ulous craftsmanship for which all B&H 
products are famed goes into our recon- 
ditioning service. When you send your 
projector to us for a complete recondi- 
tioning, it is taken apart, lenses cleaned, 
parts requiring lubrication oiled, worn parts (if any) replaced, 
then refinished, reassembled and adjusted. For complete details 
concerning this service, see your B&H dealer who will secure 
estimates on this work for you and assist in packing your pro- 
jector for shipment to the factory. 




BUY 
WAR BONDS 



MOTION PICTURE CAMERAS AND PROJECTORS 




'Dick" Whittingto 



MAY . 1943 




HOLLYWOOD'S MAGAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 




MOVIES 

FROM HOME 

CAe&t <ZAe /gey*. 



If you want to give something new, some- 
thing different, something that will bring 
lasting pleasure — send your friend or rel- 
ative in the service a roll of 8 mm. home 
movies. Nothing can cheer him more than 
motion pictures of activities back home. 
For only movies, with their natural life- 
like action, can bring his loved ones so 
close to him. 

He can enjoy these action pictures again 
and again. In practically every camp and 
U.S.O. center there are 8mm. projectors 
for showing home movies. Nearby photo- 
graphic dealers are always glad to show 
home movies to service men. Thousands 
of patriotic movie makers who live near 
training camps are also happy to project 
their movies for them. 

When you consider that moving pictures 
cost no more than ordinary snapshots, 
why not take advantage of this modern 
way of sending news to the boys in the 
service? Revere Camera Company, 320 E. 
2 1 st Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



Your letters tell him the news. And 
he wants to hear from you often. 

But at least once a month send him 
a reel of home movies and show Kim 
what's doing back home! 





Until victory is won, the craftsmen 
who made Revere 8mm. Cameras and 
Projectors are devoting full time to 
precision-built aircraft instruments 
and other war supplies. 



duxditu Jiome Movie ZcummeA 



,DVISORY EDITORS 

R. A. K. BAUMCARDNER 

Peoria Cinema Club 

■TER BEZEK 

Chicago Cinema Club 

JAMES BIALSON 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Louis 

HOSS BROWN 

Dallas Cinema Club 

ALTER BRACKEN 

The 8-1* Movie Club, Philadelphia, Pa. 

. EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographers 

JSSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema Club 

CRIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Club 

. ITHUR E. CIBBS 

Portland Cine Club 

UY A. HOOK 

Seattle 8mm. Club 

, .FRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Club 

IE. NEST ELL 

Cinemen Club 

URCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

! (LBERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 

t THEO. ROTH 

Sherman Clay Movie Club 

CO. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm. Movie Club 

I PAUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

FED E. SNYDER 

Des Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 

r F. SISSEL 

Austin Movie Club 

C RTIS 0. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 



t ered as Second-Class Matter, May 4, 1938, at 
IT Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

Sscripfion rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
t ies 25c Advertising rates on application. 



. home 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Copyrighted 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen Publications, 
publishers of Home Movies, National Photographic Dealer, and 
Hollywood Motion Picture Review. No part of contents may be 
reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR MAY, 1943 

THE READER SPEAKS l}2 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS By J. H. Scboetl I 36 

animating title letters — By George W. Cushman 139 

WAR STAMP MOVIE SHOW NETS $8,960 IN ONE EVENING.' 

— By Everett Gellert 140 

THIS GADGET SHORTCUTS SETTING EXPOSURES By Don W. KOSS .... 142 

HOW TO MAKE FAMILY MOVIES INTERESTING TO OTHERS 

— By David Prince 143 

PRACTICE PROJECT FOR MAY I44 

HOW TO MAKE ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR MOVIE FILMS 

— By Dr. Richard L. Cassell 145 

EXTENSION TUBES ALTER LENS CHARACTERISTICS 

— By Dr. A. K. Baumgardner 146 

HOME DUPLICATING OF 8MM. AND 16MM. FILMS 

— By George W. Cushman 147 

THE EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP 1 48 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW I 50 

title troubles — By George W. Cushmati 153 

INFORMATION PLEASE .._ I 57 

home movie titles — By Edmund T timer 161 

PHOTO CREDITS: Pg. 139, L. A. City Schools; Pgs. 140, 141, Daniel 
Dubroff; Pg. 143, E. J. Eisenmeier except top right by Harold M. 
Lambert; Pg. 144, (top) Skinner Photo Arts, (center) Count Von 
Schoenfeldt; (bottom) Fred C. Albert; Pg. 145, Dr. R. L. Cassell; 
Pg. 146, Arthur M. Sharp; Pg. 147, George W. Cushman. 



M 




NUMBER 
VOLUME 



5 
X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



CHAS. J. Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. |. Ver HALEN. JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



ARTHUR E. GAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORGE W. CUSHMAN 
j. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 
6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
Everett Gellert, 62 West 45th Street 
' Vanderbilt 6-5254 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S 



MAGAZINE 



FOR 



THE 



MOVIE 



AMATEUR 



PACE 132 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



Ma 

BIG HIT 

tv/tii Photo fans/ 
The G-E 
PHOTO DATA BOOK 

(more than 100,000 now in use) 

A companion to the G-E 
Exposure-meter Manual 



The Reader 




TELLS how to get more out of 
your meter for movies or "stills". 

SUGGESTS easy way to correct 
F-stop value for extreme close- 
ups. 

EXPLAINS how to make "stills" 
by metered flash, and how to 
control background emphasis. 

# You '11 like this handy guide to better 
pictures! Its 112 pages are full of prac- 
tical picture-making tips, useful tables, 
essential technical data, and helpful sug- 
gestions covering all angles of black- 
and-white and color photography. Actual 
size, 3 by 5 inches. 

Includes film speeds, movie-camera shut- 
ter speeds, developing formulas, correct 
flash exposures, paper and film speeds, 
filter factors, and other data essential to 
good picture making. Fifty cents at your 
dealer's. General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

* * * 
Probably your dealer cannot 
now supply you with a G-E 
exposure meter. Here is the 
reason: Materials and facilities 
are needed to produce equip- 
ment for our armed forces and 
vital war industries. Our efforts 
are being expended to speed 
VICTORY for the United Na- 
tions. We know you'll un- 
derstand. 



GENERAL % ELECTRIC 

v -*- x 606-126-6336 





More Agin the "B's" 

Last month, we published several let- 
ters received from readers condemning 
the motion picture industry's practice 
of continuing double features and "B" 
productions in face of film shortage. 
Since then, other letters have been re- 
ceived, some of which follows 

Gentlemen: At the last regular meet- 
ing of our club, we discussed the sub- 
ject of grade "B" pictures as produced 
by the moving picture industry in Hol- 
lywood, and the prevalent "double fea- 
ture" system in a large number of the- 
atres throughout the country. 

It seemed to the members that, in 
view of the present shortage of film, 
this would be an opportune time for 
all amateur mivie fans to get behind 
a movement to curtail or eliminate en- 
tirely the production of these second- 
class pictures. 

To this end I have been instructed by 
vote of the club to write to you, regis- 
tering the protest of this membership 
against use of film for the production 
of "B" pictures to be run as part of a 
double feature program, and putting us 
on record as being strongly opposed to 
such pictures and such double features 
even in peace time. — Gladys M. Raincy, 
Secy., Grand Rapids Amateur Movie 
Club. 

Dear Sirs: The Swingshift Cinema 
Club of Vallejo, Calif., would like to 
join the movement to eliminate "B" 
pictures and double features. We feel 
that if letters could be sent to you as an 
organization and forwarded by you to 
the authorities, they might carry great- 
er weight than if sent as individuals. 

These second rate pictures require a 
great deal of film. If eliminated, they 
would release a larger percentage of 
film for amateur consumption. We feel 
that amateur photography is very im- 
portant to National Morale right now. 

Enclosed is copy of a letter sent to 
other camera clubs — still as well as 
movie — in an endeavor to get them to 
join with us. 

— Eleanor Bird, Secy., Swingshift Cine- 
ma Club, Vallejo, Calif. 

Wants 16mm of New Zealand 

Sirs: Can you advise me where and 
how I might get in touch with some 
amateur who has made i6mm. Koda- 
chrome movies of New Zealand and 



SI'EI kS 



who might be willing to let me have 
a duplicate made from them? I have 
plenty of black and white of New 
Zealand but would like to secure at 
least ioo feet or so of scenery, native 
village at Rotorua, native Maori cos- 
tumes, etc. Any assistance in this will 
be appreciated. — Julian R. Stephens, 
Pres., Ogden Movie Club, 945 zjth St., 
Ogden, Utah. 

Wants 8mm. of New Orleans 

Gentlemen: I want to get in touch 
with some amateur in New Orleans who 
might take some 8mm. color movies for 
me. I ran short of film on my last visit 
there and now, war being what it is, I 
can't get back to shoot the scenes I 
want. — R. L. Johns, 1492 Morada Pi., 
Altadena, Calif. 

Wants Backwind 

Gentlemen: In Arthur M. Sharp's ar- 
ticle in the March issue on subject of 
"Single Frame Release for the Model 
K," he also mentions that he has built 
in a backwind in this same camera. 

I would like to know if he or any of 
your readers can offer suggestions on 
how to install a backwind in the 8mm. 
Cine Kodak model 60 in view of their 
apparent similarity in construction. — 
R. C. Glasier, 7 Owen Dr., Maplewood , 
N. J. 

Hobby Highlight 

Gentlemen: We arc enclosing a let- 
ter received from one of our customers 
which we think will be of interest to 
you and to readers of your magazine in- 
asmuch as it suggests a new and helpful 
war-time activity for movie amateurs. 
— Superior Bulk Film Co., Chicago. 
Superior Bulk Film Co., 
Chicago, 111. 
Gentlemen: 

Without a doubt, you have been won- 
dering what I am doing with so much 
film. We have a service club in our 
town. I take movies of each and ever)' 
boy or girl that enters the service. Then 
I also take pictures of them when they 
come home on furlough, in uniform. 

I really' started this out as a hobby 
but it certainly has grown into a must, 
for now. I have over 7400 feet of pic- 
tures, and 98% of my subjects are serv- 
ice boys or girls. 

We believe we have the only club of 

• Continue J on Page 1 bo 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 133 




7nv 7&wkc SATTteAcr/L 

S07W//V 0/V£ CAS7t£ WOH 





SURRENDER AT STALINGRAD!" 



d /IfflZ/ fMA7%ff£&0^ See the withering attack on Stalingrad 
through Nazi eyes— on captured German film! Advance behind roaring flame 
i throwers! Blast your way forward with rifle and grenade. Watch the big guns 
spew tons of steel into the embattled city. Then ... on Russian film . . . see the 
greatest disaster in German military history. See the heroic Russians crush 
Hitler's hordes. See top ranking Nazi officers caught like rats, bowing before 
their Russian captors. Here is a living record of a victory that will live through 
the ages! Own it. Show it now! 



BATTLE FOR TUNISIA ! 



Join the Yanks as they thunder into 
battle! Know how it feels to have a Stuka swoop down on you. Man an anti- 
aircraft gun and knock dive bombers into flaming wreckage. Watch the most 
amazing tank battle ever filmed— with both sides in camera focus! Ride in a 
strafing fighter as it blasts troops, tanks and trucks. Fly out to sea . . . smash an 
Axis ship with cannon fire and watch it blow up before your eyes! Own this 
epic of American and British fighting fury! Get it today! 





New Castle war films folder, describing 
movies of every important battle action of 
World War II. Check below to receive it. Let 
this illustrated folder help you start your 
World War II film library now! 



— ORDER FORM 



Send Castle Films' "Battle for Tunisia and Surrender at 
Stalingrad" (both in one film) in the :i*e and length indicated. 



8 mm. 



□ 50 feet 



$1.75 



□ 180 feet . 



5.50 



16 mm. 



□ 100 feet 



2.75 



□ 360 feet 



8.75 



□ Sound 350 feet 17.50 



Name. 



Address, 



City. 



State, 



RCA BLDG. 
NEW YORK 



RUSS BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Remittance Enclosed □ 

H.M. 5 



Ship C. 0. D. □ 



Send Castle Films' Free War Films Catalog □ 

Copr. 1943, Castle F ilms. Inc. 



PACE 134 HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 

Ullllllllllllli * 






it 4 Setter to BUY BONDS t/ian wear 



'tern 



How much is Freedom worth to you? 10% of your income in 
bonds ... a pint of your blood for the Red Cross Blood Bank 
. . . time and effort in Civilian Defense activities? If you're not 
in the armed forces every bit of it is a cheap price to pay for 
the privilege of being and living like an American. 




Although KIN-O-LUX efforts are devoted to supplying the 
armed forces and many government agencies, you can still 
buy some KIN-O-LUX products at leading dealers everywhere. 



KIN - 0 - LUX, INC. 



05 WEST 40tm STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PAGE 135 



FOR AMERICAN FIGHTERS 




Sound >yKt 



ooies 




& u i 



AM PRO 

PRECISION CINE EQUIPMENT 



IN THE JUNGLE 



It seems unbelievable — but U. S. fighters are seeing the latest 
sound movies, with rich, life-like tone quality, projected brilliantly 
clear right in the middle of the steaming, malaria ridden, insect 
infested jungles of the Solomons. 

The above illustration is based on an actual set-up in New 
Guinea, one of a chain of theatres in which Red Cross Field 
Director James Stewart projects the latest sound films to American 
and Australian front line fighters. 

Today, the Special Service units provide each overseas division 
of the U. S. Army with several complete portable 16 mm. sound 
projector outfits. Films are rushed to the various fronts via trans- 
port planes. In this way, U. S. fighters from the Aleutians to 
Tunisia, who consider movies as important as food, are thrilled 
with the cream of America's best and latest motion pictures. 

The Ampro Dual Unit here illustrated known as the "J Kit" is 
standard equipment for Special Service Units. In addition, thou- 
sands of Ampro 16 mm.| projectors are being used in training men 
in the Army, Navy and Air Corps. Ampro facilities are engaged 
100% in producing projectors and other precision equipment for 
the U. S. War effort. Ampro engineering is going ahead at full speed. 
To keep in touch with the latest developments in 16 nun. projection, 
make certain your name is on the Ampro mailing list. Write today! 

AMPRO CORPORATION, 2851 N. Western Ave.. Chicago, 111. 



PAGE 136 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



GOERZ 



REVIEWS... 



o( c4mateur film* 



CRAFTSMEN 



aAe dxtinxj, 



The production line of "GOERZ 
AMERICAN" is formed by skilled 
men, who through painstaking work 
create high-grade photo-lenses and opti- 
cal units for military instruments used by 
our armed forces. 

on Land — 

on the Sea — 

in the Air — 

rhese precise optical units are of the 
greatest importance to our armed 
forces, for without accurate military 
instruments for sighting, fire control and 
photographic aerial reconnaissance their 
fighting machinery would be of little 
value to them. 

aptical science together with our 
craftsmen, doing their duty on the 
job in the production line, will hasten 
victory. 

aur production is keyed to fill the re- 
quirements of our Government. With- 
in limitations we may still be able to 
supply "GOERZ AMERICAN" lenses of 
certain types and sizes for civilian use. 
We suggest your inquiries. 

Address 
Dept. HM-s 



C. P. GOERZ AMERICAN OPTICAL CO. 

Office and Factory 
317 East 34th Street New York, N. Y. 



PRECISION OPTICS 

\ Unc* fS99 

★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



SELECTED for review here this 
month are three real home movies — 
movies made with the home as the lo- 
cale and ■ with children as the object 
of interest. Children are an inexhaust- 
ible source of movie making material 
and movies with more than momentary 
interest can be made of them with a lit- 
tle thought to continuity and camera 
technique. All of the pictures described 
here are notable for one or more pro- 
duction features that should prove help- 
ful to other movie 
makers. Each film 
earned a 2 -Star Mer- 
it leader. 



A Busy Day 
for a Little Busy- 
body" is title of a 
highly interesting 
record of a little girl 
and her dog. The 
film begins by show- 
ing little girl eating 
breakfast with her 
dog. The dog a pho- 
togenic mutt with a 
definite flair for acting, almost steals 
the picture. He apparently enjoyed be- 
ing filmed and willingly performed ac- 
cording to his master's direction, in the 
breakfast eating sequence and in the 
scenes which followed. After breakfast, 
child takes dog for ride in her baby car- 
riage, then dog makes way with her 
doll. Daddy comes to rescue and child 
then helps daddy mow lawn, using her 
toy lawnmower. The picture goes on to 
show child's activities for balance of 
day — taking bath by herself, dressing, 
then retiring for the day. 

While this picture was not based up- 
on any story continuity, god photog- 
raphy made it equally interesting. The 
filmer was almost fanatic in his use of 
closeups to picture the child's activities, 
capturing action and expression that re- 
sulted in very definite screen appeal. 

Filmed by Raymond Berger, Cheekto- 
waga, N. Y., the picture ran 150 feet 
in 8mm. black and white and was ade- 
quately titled. Editing, especially inter- 
cutting of the closeups, is a masterful 
job. 



• EVERY filmer of amateur movies, 
whether a subscriber or not, is invited 
to submit his films to the editors for 
review and helpful criticism. This free 
service applies to any type of picture 
whether it be your first movie or a 
pretentious photoplay effort. Aim of 
this service is to help you make better 
pictures. 

Reviewed films will be rated I, 2 
and 3 stars. Those rating 2 or 3 stars 
will receive Free an animated leader 
indicative of its merit. Best film re- 
viewed each month will receive a spe- 
cial certificate award as the Movie 
of the Month. 

All films are returned promptly by 
insured eipress together with merit 
leaders and special analysis report. 



Our Little Helper" is a record of 
a 20 months' old son, a bright little 
shaver who is pictured as the family 
helper — a nice theme on which to base 
a child record movie. Filmed in 8mm. 
Kodachrome by Leslie and Merle Wil- 
liams, film depicts child helping moth- 
er or daddy in such chores as opening 
the garage door, setting up garden fur- 
niture, helping to mow lawn, cultivat- 
ing flower garden, bringing in milk and 
firewood, finally helping daddy with 
his house slippers as they settle down 
before the fireplace. 

Many filmers 
with a child to pic- 
ture are often lost 
for an idea on which 
to thread their ba- 
by's movie, and ran- 
dom pot shots usu- 
ally result. In this 
stance Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams sim- 
ply staged the boy 
doing natural things 
about the house as 
in the course of a 
day and filmed him 
while in action. A well photographed 
and edited picture resulted, highlighted 
with attractive opening and closing 
titles. 

X *Ah, Rats!" is not exactly a kiddie 
movie although one of the three princi- 
pals in the cast is a lad about five years 
old. The others are the boy's father and 
mother. The story concerns the marks- 
manship of the father and mother. 

The picture begins with father and 
son in the backyard of their home. The 
father is indulging in target practice 
with a pistol — the usual stuff of bang- 
ing away at a tin can set up on the back 
fence. Scampering around the garage 
doorway is a large rat. The boy calls his 
father's attention to this and thereafter 
his father's gun is directed toward this 
new, live target. However, patient and 
watchful waiting fails to reveal the rat 
who remains in hiding and only scamp- 
ers out when the father's back is turned. 

Finally the lad's mother joins them 
and when her husband relates his experi- 

• Continued on Page 160 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 137 




Make every foot count 



THESE days — with less film avail- 
able — you don't want to muff a 
single scene. So — try a film that ama- 
teurs have long relied on for clear, 
sharp results: Agfa Ansco Hypan Re- 
versible. 

Hypan is panchromatic. It has plenty of 
speed for average outdoor shooting, or 
for much of the indoor work you may do. 
In addition, its fine grain and its anti- 



halation coating both contribute to the 
final gem-like brilliance characteristic 
of Hypan when it is projected on a 
screen. 

Next time — try Hypan. Meanwhile, if 
you have any technical questions on 
films or emulsions, ask us. We'll do our 
very best to answer them for you. 
Address your letter to : Agfa Ansco 
Information, Binghamton, N. Y. 



KEEP YOUR EYE ON ANSCO — FIRST WITH THE FINEST 



Agfa Ansco 

8 & 16mm. 

HYPAN 

REVERSIBLE FILM 



PACE 138 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



HEN A FELLOW NEEDS A BINOCULAR 




"Hold it, boys! Those devils are up to some- 
thing". . . Naked eves might never have seen the 
danger. A whole detachment might have walked 
into death. Thank heaven, ONE pair of eyes in 
this group was NOT naked! 

Wars have always heen full of tricks and sur- 
prises, but vour boy today is facing the trickiest 
and most ingenious enemies history- has ever seen. 



Countless times, he may owe his life to the fact 
that binoculars are constantly on the watch. 

Universal is proud to be one of a few manufac- 
turers now making binoculars for Armj . \ av \ and 
Marines. This work has led Lniver^al to pioneer in 
many ingenious production methods — significant 
contributions to America's future leadership in the 
manufacture of precision optical instruments. 





BEFORE HE LAYS THAT WIRE! A man at work is an easy target 
for a hidden enemy. This U. S. Army Signal Corps man is 
trained to survey the terrain carefully with his binoculars 
before he starts to reel out that wire. 



KEMEMBtR YOUB 
PLEDGE TO BUY 
WAR BONDS, AND 
LIVE UP TO IT! 




There's only one flag 
we're prouder of! 



{/n i verbal Camera Corporation 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



Makers of Precision Photographic and Optical Instruments • Peacetime Manufacturers of Cine master. Mercury. Corsair Cameras 



HOME MOVIES 



Published in Hollywood 
MAY 1943 



L 



|AST month we discussed ani- 
mated titles in which illustrations did 
the moving about while the letters re- 
mained stationary. Such an arrangement 
makes a most interesting effect on the 
screen, but theoretically, an animated 
title is one in which the letters or words 
do the moving. 

Some of the animation tricks appear- 
ing in trailers and film ads seen regu- 
larly on theatre screens would appear 
to demand the utmost in specialized 
equipment, but such is not the case. Re- 




Mr: 



' . Cu *-Out nr LI 



a "me bv f : , ur ? s «n bV'~ "S e easiest t„ ~ m 

motion. 



LETTERS 



AHIHATIIG TITLE 

By GEORGE W. CUSHMAN 



duced to their simplest forms, all types 
of t tie animation are quite simple, and 
the amateur with the simplest movie 
camera can perform a great many of 
them with ease. 

As to equipment, all that is needed is 
a camera and a suitable title easel. Of 
course, if the camera is equipped with 
a single exposure lever, more elaborate 
animation can be attempted. But let's 
start out with a simple animation job. 

Let's assume the title words are to 
appear one at a time. Print the title 
on a black background using white let- 
tering (or black letters on white if us- 
ing positive film.) Set up title in usual 
way as when a normal title is to be 
made. Before photographing begins, 
cover the entire title with a sheet of 
black paper or cardboard, preferably of 
the same material as the title back- 
ground. As the camera starts, slowly 
remove the black paper, revealing the 
title word-by-word or line-by-line. 

Variations include cutting the paper 
and drawing it off the title by sections. 
Also, each line can be covered by a 
strip of paper no wider than the line, 
and as the camera runs, the lines are ex- 
posed word by word as the strip is 
withdrawn slowly to the right. 



The effects in this connection ob- 
tained by reverse motion filming must 
not be over-looked. To accomplish re- 
verse motion, the camera (or the title, 
but not both) is turned upside down. 
The action is performed exactly the op- 
posite from the way it is intended to 
appear on the screen. With this in 
mind some odd and interesting titles are 
obtainable. For instance, a title can be 
made to write itself. 

Form the words of the title out of 
a piece of white string or rope placed 
aaginst a jet black background. India 
ink can be used to black out the sections 
of string showing between letters and 
words. Start the camera, and after suf- 
ficient time has elapsed for the word- 
ing of the title to be read, slowly pull 
the string off of the background. When 
projected, the letters will appear to 
write themselves, finally forming the 
title. Old timers know that film photo- 
graphed thus must be projected end 
first, thereby making the title appear 
right side up but the action backwards. 
Those who use 8mm cameras may per- 
form this stunt, but the lettering made 
by the string must be written in re- 
verse or filmed with aid of a mirror 
that will reflect title toward camera in 
readable position. In projecting the 



8mm. title, a slight refocusing will be 
found necessary, but the sharpness or 
general effect will be equally as good 
as any other title. 

Animation does not reach its height 
of possibilities until stop motion is em- 
ployed. By stop motion is meant ex- 
posure of the film one frame at a time. 
Some cameras provide for single frame 
exposures. Cinefilmers whose cameras 
do not include this feature can us- 
ually achieve single frame exposures by 
tripping the camera release so quickly 
that only one frame is exposed at a time. 
A little practice when the camera is 
empty of film will perfect this tech- 
nique. 

Before animation is attempted, it is 
well to bear in mind the speed of 
changes in the title lettering to produce 
a correctly timed title on the screen. 
Silent films are projected at the rate of 
1 6 frames per second. This means that 
when single frame animation is at- 
tempted, 1 6 changes will consume one 
second on the screen. Or, conversely, if 
a word is to take one second to be 
formed, 16 changes will be required. It 
has been found that one change for 
every two frames exposure gives suffi- 
ciently smooth action for animated 
work, and is greatly perferred since it 
reduces the actual animation work to 

• Continued on Page i $ 8 



139 



PACE 140 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 




• Photos show volunteer members of the 
A.W.V.S. selling war stamps and bonds as 
price of admission to the War Stamp Movie 
Show conducted by Brooklyn Chapter of Reel 
Fellows, and (extreme right) center of pro- 
jection activities in Jewish Community House 
auditorium where show was staged. 



WAR STAMP MOVIE SHOW 



ne 



J6 



COME TO OUR AMATEUR 
AND PROFESSIONAL 

Movie Nite 



SAtA **C*t*M oft 
AAtT»4Arf 



4A/ 0 C04.Q 



AMATEUR "MOVIES SHOWN BY 
8KLYN CHAPTER OF REEL FELLOWS 



»V PURCHASE OF 

WAR STAMPS I BONDS 



HEN the Brooklyn chapter of 
the Reel Fellows became the Number 
One chapter of this nation-wide ama- 
teur movie organization, they set out at 
once to justify their enviable position. 
They've been doing many big things, 
some of which have been recorded in 
Home Movies; but their latest accom- 
plishment sets a mark for other Reel 
Fellow chapters and movie makers in 
general to shoot at. 

Eight thousand, nine hundred and 
sixty dollars is a lot of money, but that's 
the sum the Brooklyn Reel Fellows 



• One of the several lobby-boards 
which advertised the show many weeks 
in advance. 



raised for the national war effort in 
one evening, putting on a "War Stamp 
Movie Show" in Brooklyn, New York. 
Suppose every amateur movie group did 
as much. Why, our current second war 
loan drive would be fully subscribed in 
short order! 

The "War Stamp Movie Show" had 
its birth in a general discussion among 
the Brooklyn Reel Fellows at a recent 
meeting, a discussion that sought the 
answers to: "How can we keep active 
with our hobby now that film's so 
scarce?" and "What can we do as an 
organization to aid in the war effort?" 
The last seemed to answer the first ques- 
tion. By doing something to aid the 
war effort, it seemed reasonable they 




HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 

could keep active with their hobby. The 
movie show to sell war stamps and 
bonds was the result. 

The show was held in the auditorium 
of the Jewish Community house in 
Brooklyn. Program consisted of several 
amateur produced movies and a selec- 
tion of latest Castle Films releases. Ad- 
mission was by purchase of a war stamp 
or bond, and members of the local 
A. W. V. S. contributed generously of 
their time and membership in selling 
the stamps and bonds at the door. Reel 
Fellows are loud in their praise also for 
Eugene W. Castle, president of Castle 
Films who made it possible for them to 
screen the very latest Castle releases, 
a matter he insisted upon giving 
his personal attention upon learn ng of 
the patriotic use for which the films 
were intended. 

Mr. Castle recognized in this activity 
the beginning of a far-reaching move- 
ment among movie amateurs to gear 
their hobby to the war effort, utilizing 
their projection facilities in staging ben- 
efit shows not only to further the sale 
of war stamps and bonds but to furnish 
screen entertainment for service men in 
isolated areas. "A movement of this 
kind," Castle said, "deserves every en- 
couragement, and I am glad that I can 
offer these boys the benefit of my show- 
manship experience in their patriotic 
undertaking." 

Organizing the show was methodical 
and business like. President Larry Mi- 
iella of the Brooklyn Reel Fellows as- 
sisted by chairman Jack Coffield plan- 
ned the steps necessary for successful 
conclusion of the show. Each of the 



MSI 



in one 



• Eugene W. Castle, president. Castle 
Films, guided Reel Fellows in successfully 
staging War Stamp Movie show, gave ben- 
efit of his wide showmanship experience. 




• Tom Rizio (left) and 
Fred Berand, founders of 
the Brooklyn Chapter No. 
I of the Reel Fellows. Un- 
der their leadership, Brook- 
lyn Reel Fellows assumed 
dominant position in na- 
tion's amateur movie activ- 
ities, now become Ameri- 
ca's most important ama- 
teur movie organization by 
virtue of their movie show 
which recently sold close to 
$9,000 in war stamps and 
bonds in a single evening. 



twenty members of the chapter were as- 
signed a special task such as locating 
a suitable auditorium for the show; se- 
lecting a complete film program; writ- 
ing publicity and advertising copy and 
printing and distributing it; placing 
publicity wth newspapers; arrangng for 
use of auditorium-size screen and suit- 
able projectors; and enlisting aid of 
A. W. V. S. in selling war stamps and 
bonds. 

Credit is also due Murray Goodman 
of Castle Films who contributed much 
time and effort in aiding the Reel Fel- 
lows to successfully arrange and stage 
the show. It was he who suggested in- 
cluding motion pictures of timely topics 
as well as an animated cartoon in the 
program which started out with only 
amateur produced films scheduled as the 
attraction. 

The program began with a screening 




hi! 



nig, 



of the Castle short subject "Star Span- 
gled Banner" and this was followed in 
the usual theatrical manner with "Alad- 
din's Lamp" a Castle animated cartoon 
in color. Following this, was Castle's 
"Russia Strikes Back," "U. S. Carrier 
Fights for Life," and "Wild Elephant 
Roundup." Tfrn the amateur produced 
films were screened. These were "Aut- 
umn" by Robert Kehoes and "Bettas" 
filmed by John Larson, vice-president 
of the Brooklyn Cine Club. Both sub- 
jects received honorable mention in re- 
cent Home Movies National Amateur 
contests and were highly acclaimed by 
the audience. 

The host of uniformed A. W. V. S. 
members lent a colorful note to the oc- 
casion. Occupying desks in the lobby of 
the auditorium, they sold the war 
stamps and bonds by which purchasers 




• Above (center) Special Committee of 
Brooklyn Reel Fellows who managed the 
chapter's first and highly successful War 
Stamp Movie Show. Bottom photo pictures 
members of A.W.V.S. in special lobby booth 
where war stamps and bonds were, sold as 
admission to the show. 



were admitted to the show. An indica- 
tion of the success of the one-evening 
enterprise is the fact all stamps and 
bonds brought along for sale by the 
A. W. V. S. group were entirely sold be- 
fore the program started. Had they 
more, the gate receipts would easily 
have passed the nearly nine-thousand 
• Continued on Page i jS 

141 



THUM6 SCKEW 




BRACKET 
INDICATOR 



LI^HT C£LL 



UP 




B 





L.V. 


P. P s. 




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16 


48 


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• Diagrams illustrate novel 
use of indicator and charts to 
shorten time required for cal- 
culating and setting exposure. 
Where one ordinarily reads 
the meter, calculates exposure 
according to film being used, 
then sets lens at proper stop, 
author Koss' system requires 
only that meter be read and 
lens set to indicated light 
value to secure right exposure. 



Z)ltU gadget &hortcut& 

letting, EXPOSURES 



LNY movie maker who has at one 
time or another missed a shot be- 
cause he was not able to set his lens 
fast enough, can appreciate the prede- 
termined lens stop charts for camera 
suggested here. Trying to get a shot of 
a deer in the woods, for instance, or a 
subject that is in view but momentar- 
ily, requires fast work in computing 
light meter and setting the lens. Due 
to the speed attempted, chance for error 
is great. 

It is possible to shortcut these two 
operations by attaching to the camera 
near the lens, a pre-determined expos- 
ure chart that makes calculating expos- 
ure and setting the lens almost auto- 
matic. Fig. A in the accompanying il- 
lustration shows the arrangement adapt- 
ed to a Keystone 8mm. camera. It is 
readily adaptable to other makes of 
cameras. 

A small bracket of sheet metal is at- 
tached to the camera. In this instance it 
was fastened under the lens and to the 



W 



camera by the small name-plate screws. 
Two "lips" are folded over, one on each 
end, which serve to hold the removable 
chart in place, and a small thumb screw 
further secures chart at the middle. As 
shown in illustration, bracket can be 
designed to also hold the exposure me- 
ter if desired. 

The chart can be made as illustrated 
in Fig. B, using the lens center for the 
radii of the curved design. White cel- 
luloid is the most durable material on 
which to draw the charts. The one il- 
lustrated was cut from an old cellu- 
loid pocket calendar. The printing was 
removed with fine sandpaper. At first, 
only the lines, the speeds, and the film 
data are put on the chart and this is 
done with india ink. The f markings 
and stop positions for the various speeds 
are inked in later, after the indicator 
is made and secured in place on the lens. 

With bracket and chart mounted on 
camera, next step is to fashion the indi- 
cator needle that moves over the chart, 
as the lens diaphragm ring is turned. A 
close fitting collar is cut from a piece 



of metal tubing and fitted with a set 
screw. This is slipped over the diaphragm 
ring and secured with the set screw. 
The indicator needle fashioned from a 
piece of stiff, medium gauge wire, is 
bent to shape, as shown in Fig. A, and 
soldered to the collar. This operation, 
of course, requires that the collar be re- 
moved from the lens. 

In order to set the indicator on the 
lens again for purpose of calibrating the 
chart, open lens to widest stop and lock 
indicator in place with pointer set at ex- 
treme right-hand position on chart. A 
mark placed at this point in the fourth 
or last division of the chart indicates the 
largest lens stop, in most cases f 16. 

Next step is to close the lens gradu- 
ally, stopping at each f mark and ink- 
ing a corresponding mark and the f/ 
value in the last division of the chart. 
Next, calibrate the remaining three di- 
visions (or more if lens provides 4 or 
more camera speeds). For example, let 
us assume the situation is as follows: 
f 2.5 lens on camera; light meter cali- 
brated from 1 to 10: film speed Wes- 
ton 12; and camera speed set at 16 
f.p.s. The correct lens opening is com- 
puted on the meter by using the infor- 
mation necessary such as film speed 12, 
light value 1, camera speed 16 f.p.s. On 
the low light values, the lens opening 
called for might be larger than permit- 
ted by the lens. Therefore, do not mark 
any readings on the chart until one is 
reached that is within the latitude of 
the lens. Proceed with light value 2 

• Continued on Page 152 



142 




• "Posed" shots like this are nu- 
merous in the average reel of per- 
sonal home movies; mean little to 
an audience outside the family 
circle. Precede it with a gag title, 
though— even if its the familiar 
"Aunt Minnie — the one with the 
bonnet," and it not only gets a 
laugh but perks up audience inter- 
est in the whole reel. 



• Here's a chance movie shot of little cousin John- 
ny evidently having trouble pulling a nail. Precede 
it with a terse title thus: "**X!XX!" and immediate- 
ly it becomes a laugh-provoking highlight in the 
family movies reel. 




Movtontake FAMILY MOVIES 

interesting, to others , . . 



i 



INTIMATE family movies filmed 
v ithout continuity, while justly im- 
portant to the filmer, are dull fare for 
the spectator unacquainted with his 
guest's family and their relations; and 
no amount of off-stage dialogue by the 
projectionist, no matter how clever, 
can make such pictures interesting 
screen entertainment to those outside 
the family circle. 

Still, when we visit aunt Zenobia on 
the farm, and knowing it may be im- 
possible to get out her way again for 
the duration, we feel it a duty to get a 
few shots of her and perhaps of others 
ir her family. Usually, home movies are 
a fresh novelty to her and she willing- 
ly, if somewhat timidly, poses before 
the camera, "... just to see what she 
looks like in movies." Posed thus before 
the camera, the starting button is 
pressed and several feet of film records 
her countenance in a movie snapshot 
that will add more footage to our ever- 
growing movie album. 

With most of us, these are the most 
important pictures in our whole film li- 
brary. Others, more clever perhaps, may 
specialize on arty documentaries and 
amateur screenplays, forgetting the 
greater and more lasting personal in- 
terest provided by the most important 
documentary film of all — the movie 
record of one's family. The big ques- 
tion is whether or not to screen these 
pictures outside the family circle; 
whether our family snapshots are really 
screen entertainment. There, it seems, 



By D A V I 

is the answer — to make them entertain- 
ing if we intend to show them to out- 
siders. 

Now a little personal movies of the 
family go a long way with outside aud- 
iences, so it becomes important at once 
to show such movies in installments 
rather than the complete family movie 
album at one time. It means we must 
set about to re-edit these films in in- 
stallments in order to insure novelty and 
entertainment. 

Pete Smith attained eminent success 
as M-G-M's "shorts" specialist through 
his singular knack for 
writing clever titles. 
Given a reasonable in- 
teresting silent subject, 
Smith would write a 
series of humorous ti- 
tiles, intercut them 
with the picture and a 
hilarious short subject 
would result. With the 
advent of sound, he 
merely put into dia- 



• Clever titling of personal shots 
like this make family movies en- 
tertaining screen fare for any audi- 
ence. This closeup of Uncle and 
Sonny is so compelling it suggests 
several humorous titles. What gag 
title would you write to precede it? 



P R IN C E 

logue what formerly he would have 
written into titles. Similarly, by the ad- 
dition of clever titles, even the most 
commonplace home movie shots can be 
patterned into an entertaining movie. 

A novel idea is to group subjects — 
brothsr, sisters, uncles, etc., of whom 
we have movie snapshots — according to 
birthdays and according to various as- 
trological signs, inserting titles that 
give a condensed version of the horo- 
scope for each sign. One can obtain data 
for these horoscope inserts by referring 

• Continued on Page l 55 




PACE 144 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PRACTICE PROJECT /<>, m 

Without film in the camera, you 
can improve your framing and 
composition technique 



ay 



• • • 




1 



• Note how palm leaves falling into scene 
from top frame the picture and accent the 
tropical locale. 




• Imagine how lifeless this scene would be 
with the "Tacoma" and the ropes omitted 
from picture. 



• (Below) So many elevated or "high" shots 
leave the spectator asking "Where was it shot 
from?" Shooting from inside signal tower 
and including silhouette of signalman in the 
framing answers the question here, adds 
depth to scene. 




R HERE'S an oft -voiced theory 
that anyone who can hang a picture at 
the right spot on a wall will succeed in 
photographic composition. And it may 
be true. Most everybody who has taken 
to the hobby of making pictures has a 
latent "feel" for good composition; but 
the beginner must practice to find and 
develop this skill. It just doesn't mani- 
fest itself the first couple of times we 
take a camera in hand. The photograph- 
ers and cinematographers who make the 
best pictures didn't get that way by 
shooting a single picture. They became 
proficient only after needless practice — 
considerable trial and error. 

In these war times, its practically out 
of the question to simply fill the camera 
with film and go into the field to make 
pictures and thus practice and perfect 
our composition theories. But is film in 
the camera really necessary in order to 
practice on this phase of our movie hob- 
by? Composition begins when we raise 
camera to our eye and frame a scene 
through the viewfinder. When there's 
film in the camera and we're rarin' to 
shoot the picture, we're not apt to be 
leisurely about studying composition of 
the scene before pressing the starting 
button. 

So let's take our camera out of doors 
and indulge this month's filmless prac- 
tice project — framing and composition. 
With no film in the camera, we can take 
our time, sighting the viewfinder on 
various scenes and composing each scene 
with an eye to balance and perspec- 
tive. Choose your object, then view it 
through the viewfinder from several 
different positions, making a firm men- 
tal note of the best composition and 
what elements within it made it the 
best. 

Study the three pictures on this page. 
Note the unusual framing treatment 
that made each a more than ordinary 
composition. Take the top picture of 
the Casino at Catalina Island. The Casi- 
no has been photographed countless 
times from the same angle, but few 
photographers have pictured the scene 
with the palm fronds screening the view 
at the top. Inclusion of the palms im- 
mediately sets locale of the picture. 



In the second picture, the marine 
theme is emphasized by inclusion of 
stern of the freighter "Tacoma" and es- 
pecially by the stout hawser in the fore- 
ground. Imagine how lifeless this scene 
would be with the "Tacoma" and the 
ropes omitted from the picture. 

The third picture is not only an un- 
usual composition but a prize-winning 
photo as well. By shooting the oncom- 
ing train from the signal tower and sil- 
houetting the signalman within the 
window frame, depth and vividness 
were added to the composition making 

picture that commands more than 
passing interest. The fact it won a prize 
in a nation-wide contest proves it has 
what it takes in compositional elements. 

When training your camera on a 
scene, avoid commonplace composition. 
This doesnt' mean getting weird cam- 
era angles. The artists who photo- 
graphed the pictures described here 
made each shot in the normal way, but 
they carefully framed the scene to at- 
tain the maximum in eye-compelling 
composition before shooting. And that's 
the technique we must employ if we 
wish to make the kind of movies that 
win prizes and influence people. 

The thing to remember is that in- 
variably good composition is already 
within the scene. We don't have to put 
it in; merely set up our camera at the 
right spot and angle to get the best com- 
position the scene affords. Nor is com- 
position all a matter of camera angles 
and the inclusion of foreground ob- 
jects to obtain sense of depth. Back- 
ground, too, is a very important factor 
in good composition of many scenes. 

Take, for instance, shots of people. 
If they're placed against an uncompli- 
mentary background or if background 
design intrudes upon the interest of 
our subject in any way, the shot will 
fall short of success on the screen. The 
background will "fight" the subject for 
eye attention. Therefore, if we want a 
compelling medium or closeup shot of 
a person, we must not stage the shot 
with our subject backdropped by such 
objects as an ugly board fence, a bill- 
board, or a run-down building. 





Mo«, to m ake ENLARGEMENTS 



A 



LLMOST every amateur has a 
desire to obtain enlarged prints from 
frames of certain "prize" shots in his 
home movie films, but few ever do any- 
thing about it. Blowups of 8mm. and 
1 6mm. films can be made by almost any 
movie amateur and while certain appar- 
atus that makes the task relatively sim- 
ple already is on the market, size of en- 
largements obtained are usually small. 

More out of curiosity than anything 
else, I did a little experimenting to find 
whether or not it was possible to make 
successful enlargements as great as 8"x 
10" from my 1 6mm. Kodachrome films. 
This I found quite easy to do with 
equipment I had on hand. The three il- 
lustrations at top of page are reproduc- 
tions from 8"xio" enlargements made 
from selected frames of my recent 
prize-winning film, "Warriors of An- 
other World." If the image is not all 
you would expect, it must be remem- 
bered that the objects photographed in 
1 6mm. were tiny insects filmed under 
high magnification in which depth of 
focus was practically nil. Were these 



rom your movie 



film* 



D R 



RICHARD 



C A S S E L L 



enlargements of ordinary life-size sub- 
jects such as we are accustomed to film- 
ing with our movie cameras, details in 
the 8"xio" enlargements would com- 
pare favorably with the average en- 
largement from any Kodak-size nega- 
tive. 

Photos at bottom of page show the 
enlarging setup used. Mounted on a 
i"xn"x}' baseboard is my Graf lex 
camera with lens board removed; fo- 
cusing spotlight at opposite end; and 
in the middle the film gate and enlarg- 
ing lens mounted on a shallow cigar 
box with a hole pierced in the cen- 
ter. Details of film gate are shown in 
lower left photo. The gate was taken 
from an old model i6mm. projector and 
mounted on the upright. The pressure 
plate is held in place by an ordinary 
spring clothes-pin. Distance from film 
gate to light source (tip of 500 watt 
bulb inside spotlight) is exactly 16 
inches. This provides ample illumina- 



tion without heat that might otherwise 
buckle the film. 

On opposite side of cigar box I 
mounted the one-inch f/1.9 lens from 
my Cine Kodak, cementing it lightly 
over the hole after lining it up 

carefully with film gate on opposite 
side. There is a distance of about one- 
half inch between rear element of the 
lens and the film gate. This dimension, 
of course, is governed by size of nega- 
tive desired, and can be determined by 
inserting a strip of film in the gate, 
switching on the light, then moving 
lens forward or backward until image 
of desired size is projected on sheet of 
white paper placed in film holder of 
camera. This need only be approximate. 
Further adjustment can be made with 
the focusing adjustment on the lens. 
With the distance of lens from film 
gate thus determined, I then cut a piece 
• Continued on Page 160 



145 



• At extreme right is pic- 
tured author's set-up for 
making enlargements from 
his movie films, using lens 
and film gate from cine 
camera and a Graflex 
camera for holding the en- 
larging film. Photo at 
right is closeup of film 
gate showing pressure plate 
held in place with spring 
clothespin. 






EXTEISIOI TUBES aiu, 

ten A characteristic* . . . . 



By DR. A . K . 

D 

Jll;ECENTLY, a reader asked the 
following questions of this writer: "I 
have a one-inch telephoto lens for my 
8mm. movie camera and would like to 
add to it an extension tube one-half inch 
in length. Would this give the same re- 
sults as a 1 5/2-inch telephoto lens? How 
much would it reduce the f value of my 
one-inch lens which is now 3.5, and 
would it be in sharp focus if present 
calibrations were followed?" 

To establish an appropriate basis on 
which to discuss this problem, let us 



BAUMCARDNER 

first consider the original lens as it was 
intended to be used, viz: a i-inch tele- 
photo. Why a telephoto in the first 
place? Because the original 1 2-inch lens, 
which is standard 8mm. equipment, was 
inadequate for enlargement or for the 
common desired effect of "bringing 
closer" those objects in a distant field. 

Would an extension tube of l /i inch 
added to the l /z inch lens produce a 1 
inch telephoto lens? No, most certainly 
it would not, according to the common 
conception of a telephoto. This hypo- 
thetical situation would throw the lens 
out of focus because distance to the film 



would be increased beyond the focal 
length of the lens. The f value of the 
original lens would be destroyed at once, 
because it is determined by the use of 
the focal length as an important part 
of its formula. The original f calibra- 
tions would no longer hold true because 
we would have doubled the distance of 
the focal length for which it would be- 
come necessary to re-calibrate the lens. 
We would thus extend the lens beyond 
its range of usefulness for which it was 
designed. 

It must be clearly considered that al- 
teration of one specification, the focal 
length in particular, imposes certain 
limitations on all other specifications 
and therefore if sharp focus is to be re- 
captured at all, it can only be done by- 
making compensating alterations to re- 
gain a balance of factors. 

To add the 1 2 -inch extension tube 
to the 1 -inch lens would be attempting 
the same thing as the above example il- 
lustrates, and it is just as disastrous to 
the photographic image because of the 
• Continued on Page 1S4 



• One-half-, one- and two-inch extension tubes which • One-, two- and three-inch lenses — the last two tele- 

may be used singly or joined together and coupled with photos oil of which perform differently and assume d if - 

regular or telephoto lenses for cinemicrography. ferent f values when coupled with extension tubes. 




HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



• Fig. I — A home made, continu- 
ous film printer in which mechan- 
ism from old toy projector was 
used to transport film past print- 
ing light B. Exposure is regulated 
by altering speed of film past the 
light through motor control rheo- 
stat A. 



M 



..".MAKING duplicate prints of home 
movie films is a phase of the cine hobby 
few amateurs have indulged. Still, oc- 
casions are frequent when some ama- 
teur wishes to duplicate a scene or a 
length of film from another amateur's 
library, or perhaps dupe a scene from 
one of his own films to be used as a 
background for a double-exposed title. 
And there are movie makers who wish 
a duplicate of their most valuable films 
in order to have one print for screening 
and thus protect the original against 
the wear and tear of frequent projec- 
tion! 

Complicated and expensive equip- 
ment is not necessary for this kind of 
work for the amateur who wants the 
fun of doing it himself. He can make 
his own film printer using his camera 
or his projector, or by utilizing the 
mechanism from an old discarded 
camera. 

In the professional laboratories one 
or both of two types of printers are 
used: the continuous printer, in which 
the films travel continuously, and the 
step printer in which the films pause 
momentarily step by step in the print- 
er's intermittent movement to print 
one frame at a time. Both make satis- 




omn LITE" 

SWITCH 




HOME DUPLICATING 
OF H MD 1« FILMS 



B y 



GEORGE 



factory prints, and each have distinct 
advantages. 

Fig. i shows a home-made continu- 
ous printer made from an old toy 16mm 
projector that was purchased for $j.oo. 
The camera mechanism — motor, film 
gate, and takeup spindle — was taken 
from the camera case and after inter- 
mittent movement was removed, mount- 
ed upon a panel of wood as shown in 
photo. The printing light source is 
shown at B and consists of a compact 
light-proof housing that contains a 
7 J/2 watt no volt bulb. Light reaches 
the film through a narrow slit in the 
housing which is carefully adjusted 
over the film gate. Unlike other print- 
ers, there is no adjustment of light in- 
tensity by voltage control. The light 
remains the same at all times and den- 



• Fig. 2 — (Right) Another 
home made duplicator in 
which a model B Cine Kodak 
was utilized to provide step 
printing of original and nega- 
tive films. Here exposure is 
governed by rheostat controll- 
ing the printing light intensity. 



• Fig. 3 — (Left) Showing 
method of utilizing projector 
for printing or duplicating 
cine films. Diagrams show 
method of constructing light- 
tight lamp house and affixing 
to projector lens. Projector 
lamp is not used in duping 
process. 



W. CUSHMAN 

sity in printing is regulated by altering 
motor speed which changes rate of 
travel of film past the light source. The 
slower the film travels, the more ex- 
posure it gets ; the faster it travels the 
less exposure it receives. Rheostat for 
controlling motor speed is shown at A. 

The raw film stock on which the 
dupe print is to be made is threaded in- 
to the printer first. The full spool of 
film is placed on the lower left hand 
spindle, threaded into the film gate and 
thence to the takeup spool shown at 
right of motor. The spool containing 
film to be duplicated is then placed 
upon top spindle at left and the film 
threaded in the printer on top of the 
raw stock and thence to the large take- 
up spool mounted on a rewind or pro- 
• Continued on Page I j 5 



147 




PACE 148 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



WEE TEAPOTS AWID 



THE EXPERIMENTAL 



TABLES 



Candy Title Letters 

For making movie titles that are no- 
vel and not expensive, though clear and 
sharp on the screen, I have found that 
candy cake-letters which may be pur- 
chased at any five and ten cent store, 
answer the purpose very well. The let- 
ters are actually made of sugar, are tint- 
ed in various pastel shades, and are ap- 
proximately %-in. in height. 

Accompanying photo is a frame en- 
largement from one of my recent films 
in which the title was composed of 
these letters arranged over a back- 
ground of stained wood. If rubber ce- 
ment is used in setting the letters, they 
may be used over and over again. — 
Ethel Berl, Dcs Moines, la. 

Exposure Meter Tip 

Here is a simple method by which 
most electric exposure meters can be 
made to read f /stops directly. Place a 
piece of clear scotch cellulose tape over 
dial of the meter and with a fine pen 
and black india ink, mark the f/ stops 
on the tape over the proper places on 
the meter dial. 

Where use of films of various speeds 
is frequent, one may make several such 
scales — one for each type of film — stor- 
ing them on a panel of glass. The scotch 
tape may be removed from the glass 
and re-applied over the meter dial at 
will.— Wm. Stacy, Buffalo, N. Y. 



WANTED! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they duplicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

. ..Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 

use. 



Trick Shots 

Recently I saw the motion picture, 
Hellzapoppin" and was intrigued by 
the scenes in which Olsen and Johnson 
appeared walking around cut in half — 
one invisible from the waist down and 
the other from the waist up. 

After a little study, I conceived the 
idea of making similar split-stage shots 
with my camera by merely mounting it 
on my Eastman titler, folding down the 
auxiliary lens and masking off the title 
card holder according to my needs. 

Carefully measuring to determine 
center point on each side of titler, I 
scratched a mark at each point. These 
marks served as guides for placing the 
black masking paper over the title hold- 
er for the trick shots, as shown in illus- 
tration. 

Then, when ready to shoot the scene, 



BLOCK PPPER MUSK 



SCOTCH TP.PE 




GUIDE 
MPRKi 
FOR NIPSK 



TITLER. LENS 
DOWN 



'/4"NUT 



I covered the area between camera and 
title card holder with a piece of black 
cloth. This prevented any light strik- 
ing the black masking paper and re- 
flecting back to camera; otherwise the 
area thus masked might appear fogged 
when the masking was reversed and the 
rest of the scene superimposed over the 
area. 

By this method, any type of split- 
stage shot that can be made by elaborate 
masking equipment, can be photo- 
graphed. Unlike with masking devices 
used close to the lens or behind it, the 
line of demarcation in the masking will 
not be sharp. But this is often preferred 
in amateur split-stage work. — Lawrence 
P. Faeth, West Haven, Conn. 

If Belt Slips 

A little powdered resin sprinkled on 
a loose projector belt, either spring or 
leather, will prevent it from slipping 
on the pulley. — Richard S. Taylor. 



Saves Cement 

For those who use film splicing ce- 
ment only at intervals, cement may be 
kept from evaporating through the cork 
by sealing with ordinary paraffine. Heat 
a quantity of paraffine in a small metal 
container until it becomes liquid. Then, 
after tightly screwing cap or cork on 
cement bottle, immerse top of bottle in- 
to hot paraffine to a point below the cap. 
This will seal the cap until needed for 
use again. This sealing process may be 
repeated as often as necessary. Do not 
have paraffine too hot and use the cus- 
tomary precautions in heating same as 
prescribed when using this material in 
canning. — Byron Bruckner, Baton 
Rouge, La. 

Projection Aid 

Certain makes of projection reels fit 
some projectors rather loosely resulting 
in their slipping off the reel spindles 
unless watched closely. A safeguard 
against this hazard is to slip a replace- 
ment pencil eraser over the spindle end. 
These erasers may be purchased wher- 
ever stationary supplies are sold. — Rich- 
ard S. Taylor, Delmar, Iowa. 

Fades In Titles 

A simple method for producing fade- 
ins and fadeouts in home movie titles, 
when regular fading devices are not 
available, is to use a large sheet of card- 
board and pass it slowly before the title 
lighting source to diminish or increase 
light falling upon title, thus effecting a 
fade. As shown in sketch, to make a 
fadeout, pass the cardboard across the 
light source slowly until all light is 
cut off from the title. To fade in, re- 
verse this procedure. 

To prevent a sharp line of demarka- 
tion between light and dark area on ti- 
tle, hold cardboard as close to light 
source as possible. — Ben). Petroni, Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 



' PAPER OR 
CARDBOARD 




HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 149 



fin 





1$- ,.. 


f 


1 FELT LININ6 ' 

\y \ 

\ ! 




i 


! ! 




>4^ 





WORKSHOP 9aj9etl , trUh & 

shortcut* contri- 



Meter Holder 

The exposure meter holder suggested 
here proved very useful to me on a 
movie making tour out west some time 
ago. The holder is screwed into hole in 
camera that ordinarily takes tripod 
screw, and the exposure meter then in- 
serted in the holder. In this instance, 
holder was designed for a Weston Jun- 
ior Cine meter. 

Advantage, of course, is obvious. Me- 
ter and camera become one unit. Thus, 
there's no fumbling around for the me- 
ter — taking it out of case or pocket, 
making a reading, then putting it away 
again before making the shot. 

Holder was made from four metal 
angles such as may be had at dime store 
hardware counters. A fifth angle was 
cut into two pieces and used to join 
angles at the sides, as shown in sketch, 
with the aid of small bolts and nuts. A 
short ! 4 -in. No. 20 bolt was fitted in 
upper left hand corner to provide 
means for attaching holder to camera. 
Inside of holder was then lined with felt 
v>eather stripping, thus providing a 
snug, press-fit for the meter. — Joseph F. 
Bozovsky, Chicago, 111. 

Spotlight 

In a pinch your projector may be used 
as a spotlight for lighting up small areas 
as in animation or miniature photog- 
raphy, or for special lighting effects in 
title making. Simply remove belt from 
motor so that the shutter will not oper- 
ate, and direct light beam as desired. 
For circular spots, cut a round hole in 
a piece of cardboard and affix over the 
lens, otherwise the beam of light will be 
rectangular as per the opening of the 
fiilm aperture. — B. S. Trek, Ames, la. 



Pilot Light Switch 

Owners of 8mm. Keystone projectors 
can easily make a few changes in the 
wiring that will cause pilot light to 
switch off automatically when the pro- 
jector motor is started. No new switch- 
es need be installed and the change in 
wiring may be made in a few minutes. 
Only material needed is an eight or ten 
inch length of insulated wire and a 
screw driver. 

First remove the projector base, ex- 
posing the wiring which appears similar 
to diagram sketched here. Remove from 
the pilot light receptacle, the wire con- 
nection that runs to the rheostat. Splice 
this wire directly to the 1 10 volt lead 
wire forming a direct connection to 
rheostat, as indicated by the dotted line 
"A", and tape exposed wire carefully. 

With the extra length of wire al- 
ready referred to, connect the free pilot 
light terminal with the switch as indi- 
cated by dotted line "B". Connecting 
point on switch should be where the 
heaviest wire is joined. This leads to 



110 VOLT 
LINE 



TO MOTOR 



LIGHT WIRE 




SMITH 



TO PR OJ. LAMP 
HEAVY WIRE 



projection lamp. Tighten all connec- 
tions and the job is finished. 

The pilot light will burn as soon as 
piojector cord is plugged into wall soc- 
ket and will remain burning during 
time projector is idle. When projector 
is started, pilot light is automatical- 
ly extinguished. — /. M. Hirschinger, 
Quincy.Ili. 

Title Trick 

A novel idea for a main title in which 
the words appear made up of tiny elec- 
tric lights consists of making the title 
as follows: First of all, title must be 
shot with camera in vertical position, 
i. e., with title board in horizontal po- 
sition and 9"xi2" or larger in size. Title 
card must be of black cardboard. Sketch 
lettering lightly in pencil, then with a 
blunt object make a series of dents 
about ',4" apart along lines forming 
letters. Place in these dents highly pol- 
ished steel ball bearings which may be 
had from old roller skate wheels. The 



butedby, CinebugJ 



lights reflecting from the ball bearings 
will appear as tiny electric bulbs. 

By alternately passing a piece of 
black cardboard before the lens as you 
shoot, the effect of lights blinking off 
and on will be obtained. An accurate 
meter reading for the shot may be had 
by taking a reading from a sheet of 
white paper placed over the title. Other- 
wise taking reading directly from the 
title will result in over-exposure. — T. 
R. Kane, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Viewfinder Mask 

Not having obtained the best of re- 
sults using the supplementary finder on 
side of my Keystone 8mm. camera in 
conjunction with my new I' j-in. tele- 
photo lens, I designed a small mask 
to fit in front of the optical viewfinder 
of my camera as shown in sketch. 

This mask is made of opaque celluloid 
and a hole drilled at the bottom to per- 
mit attaching it to camera by means of 
one of the screws securing the name 
plate to front of camera case. The screw 
at this point is secured within the cam- 
era case by a small nut; so it becomes 
necessary to slit the celluloid mask and 
slip it over the loosened screw, then 
tightening screw just enough to allow 
mask to be moved freely. 

After mask is thus fitted to camera, 
the area corresponding to that taken in 




by the telephoto lens, is marked on the 
mask and cut out with a razor blade. 
When regular lens is used, mask may be 
moved away from viewfinder opening as 
shown. — M. C. Moran, Butte, Mont. 



PACE 150 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 




WHERE TO RENT OR BUY 8MM. and 16MM. FILMS 



To augment your home movie 


shows, make use of thj fins libraries 


of rental films, both sound an 


d silent, 


maintained by your photo dealer 


for 


owners of 8mm. and 16mm. projectors. 


Rental rates are surprisingly low 


and 


new films are added at regular 


ntervals. 


Dealers listed below will gladly assist 


with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 




CALIFORNIA 




NEW YORK 




HOLLYWOOD 




KENMORE 




Bailey Film Service 

1651 Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 




Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
281 1 Delaware Ave. 




/IO IN. La Drea Ave. 




in c vv i ul\^ 




Castle's Inc. 




Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 




1529 Vine Street 




30 Rockefeller Plaza 




LOS ANGELES 




Films Incorporated 




Films Incorporated 




330 W. 42nd St. 




1709 W. 8th Street 
Robert Crawford Pictures 




Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 45th St. 

Haber & Fink, Inc. 




1702 So. Kingsley Dr. 






DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 




il-ii warren jr. 




WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 




Medo Photo Supply 
15 West 47th St. 




1221 G St., N. W. 




National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 




ILLINOIS 




Nu-Art Films, Inc. 




BERWYN 




ino wesr *tDTn MreeT 




Colonial Camera Shop 








6906 Windsor Ave. 
CHICAGO 




OHIO 




Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 




CINCINNATI 




1825 Larchmont Ave. 




Haile & Assoc. (B & H Branch) 




Films Incorporated 




215 Walnut St. (Within 100 Miles) 




64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 




DAYTON 

Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 




KANSAS 








WICHITA 




OREGON 




Jeff's Camera Shop 
1 39 N. Broadway 




PORTLAND 




Lewis Film Exchange 




Films Incorporated 




216 East 1st St. 




314 S. W. 9th Avenue 




MASSACHUSETTS 

BOSTON 




TEXAS 




Don Elder's Film Library 




DALLAS 




739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 




National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 




Frank Lane and Company 




2024 Main St. 




5 Little Building 








MICHIGAN 




WEST VIRCINIA 




DETROIT 




CHARLESTON 




Detroit Camera Shop 




Elmer B. Simpson 




325 State Street 




816 W. Virginia St. 





3f) y,ou want a 

FILM to ikow 

. . . NEWS OF TIMELY SUBJECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Surrender At Stalingrad is the sec- 
ond part of Castle Films' double-release 
for April titled "Battle for Tunisia — 
Surrender At Stalingrad" and is excep- 
tionally timely in view of the wide- 
spread public attention focused upon 
current Russian action. Edited from 
captured German films, Nazis are 
Lnown in their preliminary advance up- 
on the city. The tide turns, and ex- 
cerpts from official Russian films show 
the embattled Russians surging forward 
in mighty counter-attack. Germans sur- 
render by thousands; important Nazi 
generals are captured ; and all are 
marched off to prison camps. 

"Battle of Tunisia — Surrender At 
Stalingrad" is now available from deal- 
ers and photographic supply houses in 
both 8mm. and 16mm. at usual Castle 
prices. 




American Handicrafts is an excellent 
and instructive teacher-made record of 
textile, pottery, wood-carving and glass- 
blowing "cottage industries" in the 
North Carolina mountains. Produced 
by Lucia Mysch, Ball State Teacher's 
College, Muncie, Indiana, the picture is 
in 1 6mm. sound on film, available in 
either color or black and white. Bell & 
Howell Filmosound libraries, 1801 
Larchmont, Chicago, are distributing 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PAGE 151 




the film. Sale price is $72.00 for color 
and $36.00 for black and white prints. 
Prints may also be rented by the day 
at rates of $3.00 and $1.50 respectively. 




Film Theatarettes, Inc. are produc- 
ing and releasing a series of novelty 
8mm. and 16mm. films featuring na- 
tionally-known theatrical stars. First 
film, just issued, presents Georgia Soth- 
ern, famous comedienne and dancer, in 
her unique dancing act from the Broad- 
way musical show, "Star and Garter." 
Said to be the "Hottest dance that ever 
came out of the South," it is presented 
in the film exactly as performed night 
after night before Broadway audiences 
by Miss Sothern. It is available in 100 
ft. 16mm. at $4.75 and in 50 ft. 8mm. 
at $3.75 from Film Theatarettes, Inc., 
12 W. 44th St., N. Y. C. or leading 
photo dealers. 




Zenobia, starring Oliver Hardy, Billie 
Burke and Harry Langdon is a popular 
Hal Roach production now available in 
1 6mm. sound from Post Pictures Corp., 
723 Seventh Ave., New York City. 
Teamed with an elephant, Hardy is said 
to give one of his greatest performances 
in this picture supported by an excellent 
cast. 

Prices and address of nearest release 
office may be obtained by writing to 
Post Pictures Corp. 

Dark Sands is an 8 -reel sound film 
starring the negro actor, Paul Robeson, 
supported by Henry Wilcoxon and Wal- 
ly Ford, and released by Commonwealth 
Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. Robeson is one of a cargo of 
negro soldiers en route overseas in 



Here's the Key 
to Good 
Titling ! 

Home movie titling is really easy 
once you have a reliable guide that 
tells how to focus and center camera, 
what exposure to use, styles of let- 
tering to use, title measurements, etc. 
Here is THAT guide written by Amer- 
ica's title making authority, George 
Cushman. Its contents include: 



0 How to compose and letter titles 

• Choosing proper title backgrounds 
© Auxiliary Lens Chart and Field Areas 
0 How to develop your own titles 

• Tinting and Toning Titles 

• Complete plans for building titler 

THIRD EDITION NOW READY. ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY! 




*1 



00 



Postpaid 

VER HALEN PUBLICATIONS 6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 




REEL FELLOWS! 

Mark your home movie films with the badge of prestige — the new animated 
Reel Fellows leader now ready for distribution to members of the Reel 
Fellows organization of movie amateurs. When ordering be sure to indicate 
8mm. or 16mm. size. We ship postpaid. 



8MM 



16MM. 





THE REEL FELLOWS— 6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Catif. 



PAGE 152 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 




New "Professional Jr." Tripod 

Worthwhile Itmm. filming, whether silent or 
sound, requires a sturdy yet versatile tripod 
built along professional lines. The new 
"PROFESSIONAL JR." is built to precision 
standards, weighs but 14 lbs. Friction type 
head gives super-smooth pan and tilt action. 
"Spread-leg" design assures utmost rigidity 
and quick, positive height adjustment. Camera 
platform takes EK Cine Special, B&H Filmo, 
Bolex or Berndt-Maurer Cameras; also adapt- 
able for 35mm. Eyemo, DeVry, etc. Used by 
the U. S. Gov't, leading 14mm. producers and 
newsreel companies. 

Send for literature describing 14 features thoroughly. 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT CO. 



1600 Broadway 



New York. N. Y. 



For Your Son or Daughter 



HOLLYWOOD STARS 

autographed photos 



5"x7" (suitable for framing) 

Clark Gable, Roy Rogers, Gary Cooper, Joan Fon- 
taine, Bing Crosby, Rita Hayworth, Charles Boyer, 
Humphrey Bogart, Joe E. Brown, John Boxles, Jack 
Carson, Lana Turner, Linda Darnell, Bill Elliott, Errol 
Flynn, Cary Grant, William Holden, Louis Hayword, 
Bob Hope, Arthur Lake, Joan Leslie, Robert Mont- 
gomery, Edward O'Brien, Tyrone Power, Mickey 
Rooney, Tex Ritter, Rosalind Russell, Larry Simms, 
Randolph Scott, Charles Starrett, Sally Wadsworth, 
Loretta Young. 

25c apiece — 5 for $1.00 

HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 

6408 Selma Hollywood, Calif. 



STOP "APOLOGIZING" 
for your movie titles 

• To prove how easy it is to make beautiful pro- 
fessional-lorking titles. . . A-to-Z offers you a 

SAMPLE TITLE KIT— FREE 
Send for your kit today — it's free 

A-to-Z MOVIE ACCESSORIES 



175 Fifth Ave. 



Dept. H50 



New York. N. Y. 



WARTIME PHOTOGRAPHY 



— while preparing for sound future ca- 
reers! Trained men and women photog- 
raphers are needed now more than ever 
before. Qualify at largest, oldest school that has trained 
many of today's most successful photographers. Over 450 
N. Y. I. trained men winning promotion, higher pay in 
photo divisions of Armed Service. Resident or home 
study courses. Big FREE bonk gives details. 

N. Y. INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
Dept. 114, 10 W. 33 St.. New York. N. Y. 



World War I. The ship is torpedoed and 
Robeson attempts to save several of his 
comrades. He encounters trouble with 
a superior officer, escapes and goes to 
Africa where he's made leader of a na- 
tive tribe. Later, when Robeson is lo- 
cated by officer, he is forgiven, and al- 
lowed to remain in Africa. Further de- 
tails, prices, etc., may be had by writing 
Commonwealth Pictures. 

Target for Tonight, sensational Brit- 
ish film that enjoyed such a sensational 
run in the nation's theatres is now being 
released in i6mm. sound by Castle 
films, New York City. This is one of 
five films made available by the Office 
of War Information and distributed by 
Castle. Other subjects are: Western 
Front, Salvage, Manpower, and Listen 
to Britain. These films are being dis- 
tributed at exceptionally low cost in 
order that they may receive the widest 
possible circulation. Defense councils, 
war bond selling groups, service clubs, 
schools, etc., are urged to take advant- 
age of their availability to further a bet- 
ter understanding of the progress of the 
war effort. 

One Million B. C, a spell-binding por- 
trayal of precarious life in the Stone 
Age, featuring Victor Mature, Carole 
I andis and Lon Chaney, Jr., has just 
been released on 16mm. sound film by 
Post Pictures Corp., New York. Giant 
pre-historic monsters and puny man's 
intelligence are pitched against each 
other in their struggle for existence. 

This is the eighth Hal Roach 16mm. 
production released by Post Pictures. 
The other releases, which are proving 
very popular, are: "The Housekeeper's 
Daughter," with Adolphe Menjou and 



Joan Bennett; "There Goes My Heart," 
with Fredric March and Virginja Bruce; 
"Topper Takes A Trip," with Con- 
stance Bennett and Roland Young; and 
"Captain Fury," with Brian Aherne 
and Victor McLaglen. "Turnabout," 
with Adolphe Menjou and Carole Land- 
is will be available shortly. 

Educational Films. An increasing 
number of school-made and teacher- 
made educational films are becoming 
available in straight commercial distri- 
bution, according to Bell & Howell 
Filmosound Library. Right out of the 
schools, and generally reflecting stu- 
cient-teacher projects, come such films 
as Spinning Spokes, Analytical Bal- 
ance Technique, Linoleum Block Cut- 
ting, Essentials of Wood-Turning, Pot- 
tery Making and others. 

Directly out of museum activities, 
closely allied to school film production 
projects, come such films as Making 
the Dead Appear To Live, and Green 
Pea Fowl, (Field Museum, Chicago) 
Desert In Bloom, (Carnegie Museum, 
Pittsburgh) Yellowstone Wildlife (Den- 
ver Museum) and Spearfishing, (Marine 
Museum, Miami). Then there are teach- 
er travel films such as Mexican Album, 
Puerto Rico, The Real Hawaii, Navajo 
Sand Painting, Indian Dances of the 
Southwest, etc. 

Of course, there are many hundreds 
of school-made films that have not come 
up to the standards necessarily set for 
commercial distribution to other schools, 
but to an increasing extent, school-made 
films are making the grade. Further in- 
formation may be had from Bell & 
Howell, 1801 Larchmont, Chicago. 



Qadg,et Set* exposure* . . • 



• Continued from Page 142 

in the same way. This time, the set- 
ting might be f 2.5. Set lens at f/2.j 
and where indicator points on chart, 
mark the figure 2, indicating a light 
value of 2. Proceed in same manner un- 
til all light values are marked within 
the 16 f.p.s. range of your camera.. 
Then proceed in a like manner for the 
12 and 48 f.p.s. speeds ( or whatever 
speeds your camera provides.) 

Where films with emulsion speeds 
other than Weston 12 may be used, it 
will be necessary to make a separate 
chart for each film, following the same 
procedure as outlined here. One import- 
ant chart will be that for films with a 
Weston rating of 8. This rating in- 
cludes several panchromatic emulsions 
as well as regular Kodachrome. To pro- 
tect inked-in data on charts, apply 
light coat of clear shellac. 

With the charts completed, all that 



is necessary to facilitate split-second 
exposure calculation is to have the cor- 
rect chart in place on the camera, take 
a meter reading, then move lens until 
indicator needle points to proper light 
value on chart. Lens opening is thus 
automatically set. And should you de- 
cide to make the shot at 12 f.p.s. or 48 
f.p.s. instead of 16, there is no delay in 
calculating difference in exposure. Its 
there right before you on the chart. 

Fig. C illustrates another simple 
form of exposure chart which is self 
explanatory. It is computed in the same 
manner as the charts just described, ex- 
cept that the lens openings instead of 
light values are indicated in the f.p.s. 
columns. Such charts can be typed on 
small cards and kept in a small leather 
folder or covered with a small panel of 
clear celluloid and attached to side of 
camera by means of scotch tape. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 153 



TITLE TROUBLES 



By CEORGE W. CUSHMAN 



I 



[F you have any questions per- 
taining to titles or title-making, Mr. 
Cushman will be glad to answer them. 
Address him in care of Home Movies or 
his residence, 1333 Locust St., Long 
Beach, Calif. In explaining your title 
troubles, include information such as 
type of equipment used, film, light 
source, and where possible, send along a 
sample of the title film. Enclose a self- 
addressed stamped envelope if you wish 
an early reply. 

Q. You stress fact that all films 
should be titled. I have just completed 
a summer camp promotion film, screen- 
ing of which will be accompanied by 
lecturer's oral narration. Are descriptive 
titles necessary to this film? — M. D. C., 
Marietta, Ohio. 

A. For a film of this kind, the oral 
narration would only repeat what is 
stated in the titles and as narration is su- 
perior to titles in a film of this kind, 
it is advisable to omit descriptive titles. 
Be sure, however, that your film is 
dressed up with main and credit titles 
and, of course, an end title. 

Q. Is it possible to dissolve a title 
with a scene? — H. S., Appleton, Wis. 

A. If both scene and title are photo- 
graphed on the same film, yes. If title is 
to be made on positive and the scene on 
reversal, then the task becomes too 
great, involves duplicate printing, and 
I wouldn't advise it. In the first in- 
stance, proceed as usual — shoot title, 
fade out, wind back film, shoot scene — 
fading in. 

Q. In making scroll titles on a re- 
volving drum, reflection from the 



THE LAST WORD 

in titling technique for home movies 
is given by George W. Cushman in 
his book, "How to Hitle Home Mov- 
ies," available to readers of HOME 
MOVIES at $1 a copy. If you regu- 
larly have followed Mr. Cushman's 
advice in this department, you will 
want his exposition of basic titling 
technique, complete with illustra- 
tions on all phases of the subject. 
Send a dollar bill today for HOME 
MOVIES' compete textbook on this 
all important phase of movie mak- 
ing. It includes complete plans for 
building your own titler, too! 



BUY WAR BONDS 



curved surface is troubling me. It is par- 
ticularly troublesome because the title is 
double-exposed over a picture back- 
ground. What remedy do you suggest? 
— G. S. R., Scranton, Pa. 

A. While the background used for 
any title that is to be double-exposed 
must be absolutely soft black, it be- 
comes all the more imperative when the 
background is to be curved, offering a 
varying, reflective surface to the lights. 
If title drum is small and text is to 
be hand lettered or printed, use black 
"suede" finish paper for the title card. 
This can be had from the paper houses 
that supply printers. For larger drums 
and pin-back letters, try black cotton- 
pile velvet. 

Q. I plan a new departure in titling 
my next film in that I plan to superim- 
pose brief titles of not more than two 
lines at the bottom of certain scenes. 
Have you any sttggestion that will en- 
able me to accomplish this easily and 
successfully? — H. McC, Denver, Colo. 

A. You're tackling a job, but it can 
be done. First it will be necessary to plan 
lighting those scenes in which titles will 
appear so that foreground or lower part 
of picture frame will be quite dark if 
not altogether black, as a background 
for the title. Next comes problem of 
winding back film to exact frame line 
where superimposition of title is to be- 
gin. If your camera's equipped with an 
accurate frame counter, your task is 
easy. Otherwise, you may find it expedi- 
ent to superimpose title immediately af- 
ter shooting scene. In this way you need 
only wind back the one scene at a time. 

Q. I plan to shoot my own titles on 
positive film but am not prepared to do 
the developing. Are there laboratories 
to whom I can send my film for dei el- 
oping and if so, where? — fames Bar 
lowe, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

A. Yes, most all of the film labora- 
tories advertising in Home Movies can 
develop your film for you. Among these 
are: George W. Colburn Laboratory, 
197 Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 111.; 
Corona Film Labs., 1028 N. Y. Ave., 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Fromader-Genera Co., 
Davenport, Iowa; Ritter Film Service, 
629 Lyman Ave., Oak Park, 111.; and 
ESO-S Pictures, 3945 Central, Kansas 
City, Mo. 




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Filmo Camera or Projector. New "Mod- 
ernization Folders" give details and costs. 
Ask your dealer or write, stating your Filmo 
model. 

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• If you own a Bell & Howell Camera or 
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to take especially good care of it. Do this 
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classes of our new, economical, mainte- 
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PACE 154 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



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TITLE BACKGROUNDS 

Available now are some of the best title backgrounds 
which appeared in earlier issues of HOME MOTIES. 
These are for typewriter titlers only and are available 
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• Continued from Page 146 

primary violation of throwing out of 
focus, a lens which is made to focus 
at 1 inch. Therefore, it would be easy 
to end the discussion here and say: "No, 
it can't be done." But if one asks: "Can 
I get a picture with the lens extended 
y 2 inch by the use of the above de- 
scribed equipment?" the answer can 
very well be "Yes." So, starting with 
the elementary law of optics, which 
deals with conjugate foci, we begin to 
see possibilities. A fixed focus lens of 
any given focal length can have its ob- 
ject and image reversed — size of image 
and object in direct proportion to the 
distances involved. 

The most striking example of this 
phenomena is the reversal of image and 
object in the case of projection as com- 
pared to photography. In other words, 
we have an image on the film which we 
photographed in the usual manner. The 
snme image is placed in a projector and 
by means of light, we push it back 
through a lens system, similar to the 
lens system which photographed it, 
and we throw the object back to a psue- 
dc infinity. 

Let us consider at this point that our 
standard projection lenses are twice the 
focal length of standard camera lenses 
2nd therefore we obtain a more suitable 
size of screen object; but if the pro- 
jector lens was not adjustable in a fo- 
cusing mount, it would be necessary to 
find the one distance at which the 
screen could be placed to create a sharp- 
ly focused picture. Fortunately, by a 
very simple focusing adjustment, we 
are able to place the screen at most any 
convenient distance merely by changing 
distance between lens and the film. In 
this focusing operation we find the con- 
jugate focus which produces a clear 
sharp picture on the screen. 

Obviously, if the lens used in projec- 
tion were of the same focal length as 
that used in photography, and the dis- 
t.mce-to-screen were the same as object- 
to-camera, the projected picture would 
be the same size as the original object. 

With the foregoing explanation, we 
have a foundation upon which we can 
advance the principles of conjugate foci 
as employed in tube extension photog- 
raphy. (Foci is the plural of focus; 
conjugate means combined in pairs; 
kindred in meaning and origin. 
Conjugate foci are then the distances 
from the lens to the image and from 
the lens to the object. — Ed.) Many de- 
sirable effects can be obtained by using 
extension tubes such as in extreme close- 
up studies of insects, small moving 



parts such as in a watch movement, 
and texture of cloth, paper and numer- 
ous other materials. This phase of pho- 
tography bridges a gap between the 
conventional uses of which we are all 
so familiar, and that other extreme 
known as photomicrography which pro- 
duces photographs of objects highly 
magnified that otherwise might have 
been obtained only through a micro- 
scope of rather high magnification. 

The standard camera lens is first con- 
sidered as in focus at infinity. By in- 
creasing the distance from lens to film, 
we must shorten the distance from lens 
to object to arrive at the conjugate of 
foci. The greater distance we select for 
the extension tube, the shorter will be 
that distance from lens to object. This 
involves a problem in photography, as 
often the lens is so close to the object 
that it is difficult to illuminate it due 
to the shadows cast by the lens barrel. 
As the distance is increased, size of im- 
age is also increased. This idea is com- 
monly used in commercial copying of 
stills and there are certain known con- 
trolled factors to determine the size 
of image and to vary it according to 
special requirements. 

A few of the fundamentals may be 
important. The simple rules which 
should be applied pertain to image size. 
When a lens is extended to a distance 
which is twice its focal length, and the 
object is also placed two focal lengths 
distant, the film image will be the same 
size as the object. This is almost the lim- 
it for short focal length lenses such as 
we use in cinematography, although tel- 
ephoto lenses require longer extension 
tubes to retain this proportion. This is 
considered rather satisfactory magnifi- 
cation as the image on the film, being 
natural size, will project to several 
thousands times its original size. 

In rube extension photography, it is 
imperative that some method of reflex 
focusing be employed, as the area cov- 
ered by the lens will be very small and 
parallax is certain to result. Also, re- 
finements in focusing are necessary due 
to the very limited depth of field which, 
incidentally, is practically nil. 

Returning to our original problem, 
we take up the second question regard- 
ing the changing of f values by virtue 
of the added extension tube. Yes, f 
value of the reader's lens will be changed 
and it becomes necessary to calculate 
new f values for the lens when used 
with the extension tube by a mathe- 
matical formula which will follow 
shortly. For simplicity, it is suggested 
that the \' 2 inch extension tube be used 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 155 



with the ^2 -inch lens, and for the i- 
inch lens, a i-inch extension tube to 
conform with the above explanation. 
Using the i-inch lens and the i-inch 
extension tube makes it easier mathe- 
matically to apply the formula for 
exposure which follows. For conveni- 
ence, lens measurements will be con- 
sidered in terms of millimeters, the i- 
inch lens equaling 25mm: 

Distance of lens to image squared 

Focal length of lens squared 
or 

50 x 50 2500 4 



37.5 x 37.5 



1406.25 
625 



2.25 



25 x 25 

In which case the exposure will be 
increased 2 l / A times. The new f value of 
the reader's f/3.5 lens would become 
approximately f / j. 

In this last example we can also com- 
pute the distance at which the object 
should be placed, using this formula: 

Focal length of lens plus 

Focal length of lens 



25 



25 



625 



1 



The exposure, therefore, must be in- 
creased 4 times. Accordingly, if a meter 
reading indicated an exposure of f/8, 
we would set the lens at f/4. 

Now, if we apply the problem as the 
reader suggests, using the l /z -inch exten- 
sion with the i-inch lens, we have a 
lens to image distance of 1 l /z times the 
focal length, which produces an image 
size equal to one-half the size of the 
object. However, the distance of the 
object from the lens will be increased 
to be in sharp focus: 



Magnification (or reduction) 
or 25 + 25 

0.5 = 25 + 50 or 75mm 
converted back to inches equals 3 

When it is desired to calculate the re- 
vised f value of a certain lens-tube 
combination to correspond with light 
reading indicated by the exposure me- 
ter, proceed as follows: Divide the f 
number indicated by the exposure meter 
by the sum of the focal length and 
lens extension. Then multiply this fig- 
ure by the focal length of the lens. The 
result will be the number at which the 
lens diaphragm must be set in order to 
give the exposure indicated by the 
meter. 



J4ome film duplicating, . . . 



• Continued from Page 147 

jector nearby. The emulsions of both 
films thus contact each other. As the 
films travel from left to right, they 
pass the beam of light which projects 
image of the top film on emulsion of 
film stock below. 

All of the operations, from time raw 
stock is opened and threaded into print- 
er, must be carried on in complete dark- 
ness except at such times when certain 
film stocks are used that permit use 
of a safelight. This, of course, excludes 
Kodachrome. Where positive film is to 
be used, a red safelight may be em- 
ployed. With panchromatic, a regula- 
tion panchromatic safelight may be em- 
ployed if kept at a maximum distance 
and turned on only when absolutely 
necessary. 

Figure 2 shows an improvised step 
printer. A model B Cine Kodak, with 
lens removed, serves as the printing de- 
vice while the projector shown at right 
serves to hold the reel of film to be 
duplicated. The camera is mounted 
on a baseboard and a light-tight metal 
lamp housing containing a 7 J/2 watt 
110 volt lamp fitted into the lens seat. 
The raw stock is threaded into the cam- 
era in the usual manner and the film to 
be duped threaded over it; but instead 
of continuing on to the camera take- 
up spool, it falls conveniently into a 
cloth-lined basket beside the table. 



The camera motor runs at constant 
speed and exposure is governed by in- 
creasing or decreasing light intensity 
by means of the rheostat mounted on 
baseboard near the camera. 

When using the double 8mm. camera 
as a printer, it may be found difficult if 
not impossible to thread single 8 pro- 
cessed film together with the double 8 
raw film. Some cameras will accommo- 
date this procedure, but a trial should 
first be made before a duplicate print is 
actually tried. Single 8 cameras will 
work satisfactorily, as will practically 
all 1 6mm. cameras, providing, of course, 
that the camera sprockets will accom- 
modate the increased thickness caused 
by the second film running through the 
camera. 

Any 8mm. or 16mm. projector can 
also be used as a step printer in a sim- 
ilar manner. Fig. 3 shows how to con- 
struct the printing light housing and 
attach it to the projector lens for dup- 
ing purposes. By employing this meth- 
od, the regular projector lamp is not 
used. The two films are threaded into 
the projector together with emulsions in 
contact. Although not illustrated, the 
raw stock spools are on separate spin- 
dles, the same as in the two methods 
previously described. 

After the printing operation is com- 
pleted, the negative film, i. e., the ex- 




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Charles Bass 
PRESIDENT 
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CINE KODAK SPECIALS 
PROJECTORS - ETC. 

Write Dept. HM 




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MASTER TITLEER for Easy Titles 

THE MASTER TITLEER makes titling easy, eco- 
nomical, and a pleasure. Makes all types of titles: 
typewritten, hand lettered, script, block letter, mon- 
tage titles, "effect" titles, trick titles, superimposed, 
rear projection, etc. All may be done in black and 
white or Kodachrome — artistically done with a per- 
sonal touch, and with professional quality. Titleers 
are available for all popular makes and models, of 
8mm. and 16mm cameras. Specify camera when 
ordering. 

TITLETTERS, the perfect miniature block letter for 
black and white or Kodachrome titles. Letters are 
5/16" high, clear cut, and have special adhesive on 
back which permits sticking to any substance — glass, 
celluloid, paper, etc. — without soiling. Will last in- 
definitely. Use with MASTER TITLEER to make 
title? "on the spot" and save film and work, making 
use of natural backgrounds. Set consists of 120 char- 
acters, plus assorted colored backgrounds and pic- 
tures, bottle of adhesive, tweezers, etc. Available in 
red or white. Specify color. 

ATTXILIARY LENSES, for titling, special close-up 
shots of flowers, insects, for table-top work, por- 
trait close-ups, etc. Available in focal lengths of 
6, 8, 12, 16, 18, 20, 24, 26, 32, 40 inches. Use with 
any 8 or 16mm. movie camera, or with still camera. 

PRICES, direct prepaid 

MASTER TITLEER, including Excise Tax $11.08 

TITLETTER SETS 4.95 

AUXILIARY LENSES, including Excise Tax. .69 
SET OF ANY SIX LENSES, inc. Excise Tax.. 3.41 

HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS 

3227'/ 2 So. Figueroa Street Los Angeles, Calif. 



Kodachrome 

MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 
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Distinctive TITLES 
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For the Amateur and Professional 

16MM. — 8 MM. 
Black and White - - Kodachrome 
Write for our new illustrated catalog 
STAHL EDITING & TITLING SERVICE 
33 West 42nd Street New York. N. Y. 



PACE 156 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



HOW TO MAKE 
HOME MOVIE 

GADGETS 




HOME MOVIES MAGAZINE SERIES 



Do you get a lot of pleas- 
ure from building your own 
home movie gadgets? Then 
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HOME MOVIE 

GADGETS 

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$4 00 PER COPY 
postpaid 

Nearly 100 pages profuse- 
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No theories — every gad- 
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HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 



posed raw stock, may be developed to 
a negative, where black and white film 
is used, or it may be reversed. Develop- 
ing the film to a negative and making 
.">. positive print from it will n^t best re- 
sults. Since reversal duplicates tend to 
increase contrast, the negative-positive 
process is preferred because it permits 
controlling contrast in developing and 
printing. Moreover, little or no surface 
halation occurs in this process. 

Where 8mm. film is being duped, it 
is almost mandatory to follow the neg- 
ative-positive method for the reason 
that a reversal dupe print would neces- 
sitate projecting the film upside down 
o r reversed from left to right. A posi- 
tive 8mm. print made from a negative 
would project in the same order as the 
original. 

The negative-positive method pre- 
sents some disadvantages, nonetheless. If 
there's the least amount of dust or dirt 
on the negative, it seems to be magni- 
fied tremendously in the projected posi- 
tive. Great care must be exercised, there- 
fore, to insure a spotless negative dur- 
ing the entire developing and printing 
procedure. 

The printer, too, must be in the best 
working order to insure that both films 
are in full contact with each other as 
they pass the printing light. If the gate 
is loose or the films are otherwise per- 
mitted to buckle or pass the film gate 
loosely, fuzzy or out-of-focus prints are 
liable to result. 



Grain is another factor to be consid- 
ered. Where reversal film presents a 
minimum of grain, the negative picks 
up grain and this, coupled with the 
grain inherent in the positive, re- 
suits in greatly increased grain in 
lhe final print. A fourth and no 
Uss important factor is film cost which 
is doubled in the negative-positive meth- 
od as against the reversal method where 
the one film becomes successively the 
negative then the positive print. 

As to the tvpe of film best adapted 
for duping purposes, I have found or- 
dinary positive stock very satisfactory 
lor the negative, the positive and for 
reversal. Kodachrome can also be dupli- 
cated, although in the hands of the 
average amateur it presents additional 
problems. For one thing, the ordinary 
light bulb, described in the printers 
here, cannot be used in duping Koda- 
chrome since the light emited from it 
i> too yellow in color. A pure white light 
must be used in the printer and such 
a lamp small enough for this use is fre- 
quently difficult to find. 

With both sides thus presented, it is 
probably best to leave the final decision 
to the individual. No doubt this discus- 
sion is not sufficient for a final conclu- 
sion and a trial of each duplicating 
method may be necessary in order for 
the movie amateur to determine which 
produces the particular results he de- 
sires. 



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c 




e 












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BUN-OLCX 

No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 3 Gold SeaL. 



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HOLLYWOOD 

8. S. Pan 

Pan 

Seml-Ortho 



I 40 
1100 



UNI VEX 

Standard 

Ultra pan 

Ultrapan Super-Speed 

GAMMACHBOiDE 

Regular 

Phii 



18 I _ I 8 

20 | _ | 12 
26 I 24 | SO 
- I 29 I — 

I I 

26 | 25 | SO | 40 

21 | 2* | If I 12 
18 I 12 I S| S 

I I 



Superpanex No. 100.. 
Superpanez No. 24_ 
Colorton* 



I I 

17 I 14 I 
20 I 18 | 
23 I 21 I 

I 

18 I 10 I 
20 I IT I 12 
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23 ■ 21 I 24 
18 I 10 I 8 



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s | 
I 



**Ratlngi for lait four Dupont ftlmi are for ttralght derelopment. Ratingi !cr rererial depend upon proeeafag 

formula! and technique employed. 
•With fllur. 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PACE 157 



information please 



Processing Quirk (Arnold Donovan, 
Cleveland, Ohio.) 

Q. I'm a novice at home processing, 
have processed but two batches of film 
— one positive and the other panchro- 
matic. Can you tell me what causes 
film, when placed in the second devel- 
oper, to turn a purplish red in color and 
then to black? The color change starts 
at edges of film and works slowly to- 
ward center, but soon turns entirely 
black. 

A. The changing of colors is a nat- 
ural reaction of film placed in the sec- 
ond developer. The silver in the emul- 
sion is white or somewhat ivory in color 
and this turns black as it is transformed 
to its metallic state by chemical pro- 
cess. As this change is taking place, 
each grain of silver undergoes the color 
change. The faster the emulsion, the 
slower the film develops and the slower 
the change in the color. This metamor- 
phosis is natural and in no way detracts 
from successful result of processing. 

Outdated Kodachrome (Kenneth L 
Miner, Trenton, N. J.) 

Q. / have two rolls of Kodachrome 
film I'm saving 'til summer to use on 
a vacation trip. However, according to 
notation on carton, this film will be 
outdated on May ist. If I use it two 
months later, will the film have deteri- 
orated sufficiently to cause poor photo- 
graphic results? 

A: No. In dating film, all manufac- 
turers allow a certain margin for safe- 
ty. In most cases, film exposed two or 
three months after expiration date pro- 
duces successful pictures. However, it 
is usually possible to get good pictures 
with film considerably outdated if ex- 
posure is increased slightly. One filmer 
we know shot Kodachrome that was 
outdated by ten months. He allowed l /z 
stop extra exposure and got good pic- 
tures. 

Filter Factors (Pvt. Richard J. Cou- 
sins, Phoenix, Ariz.) 

Q. With Kodachrome harder to get 
Ym now back to my old "love" — Xan- 
chromatic film. Scenery here begs for 
use of filters. I need dope on converting 
filter factors to correct exposure. Can 
you help me? 

A. We published complete filter fac- 
tor charts on page 324 of the August 
1942 issue. However, here is a simple 
method you may employ with any filter 
to immediately find correct exposure 
setting: 

Assuming you have a photo-electric 



• Readers: This department is for your 
benefit. Send in your problems and our 
technical board of professional cameramen 
will answer your question in these col- 
umns. If an answer by mail is desired, 
enclose addressed stamped envelope. 



exposure meter proceed as follows: In- 
stead of taking a meter reading then 
calculating allowance in exposure for 
filter use each time, reduce the Weston 
rating of the film you are using accord- 
ing to factor of filter used. 

In other words, if filter factor is 2 
and Weston rating of your film is 24, 
divide the rating by the factor (2) 
which will give you 12 — the film speed 
to use in calculating your exposure. 

Overdeveloping (M. H. Buckley, 
Seattle, Washington.) 

Q. What results in home processing 
procedure if a normally exposed film is 
given too much time in the first de- 
veloper? 

A. Overdevelopment would result. 
This would convert more of the silver 
in the emulsion to metallic silver than 
necessary, leaving less silver to be acted 
upon in the second developer. A lighter 
image would result producing "washed 
out" image on the screen. The tendency 
would be to reduce detail by making the 
highlights brighter and the shadows al- 
most opaque. 

Projection Lamps (Meredith Hayes, 
Springfield, 111.) 

Q. I understand that the govern- 
ment has "frozen" all photoflood lamps. 
Does this order affect projection lamps, 
too? 

A. No, projection lamps are still 
available without any restrictions so far. 
If your dealer cannot supply you, write 
direct to General Electric or Westing- 
house Electric Companies. 

Backing Remover (Walter Hiatt, 
Pueblo, Colo.) 

Q. What is the easiest method for re- 
moving the anti-halation backing from 
Eastman films? 

A. In home processing Eastman film, 
the anti-halation coating can be re- 
moved by bathing the film in a solution 
consisting of 1 quart of water to which 
2 drams of ammonia has been added. 
Where permanganate bleach is used in 
processing formula, this will remove it 
also. 





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write for complete list to 

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254 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



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Despite Rumors Plenty of Film Available 



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MOVIES.'j 



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50 ft. Special. $1.00 

I (Reg. $2.00). 100 ft. 16mm.. 
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I cut and lists. 10c. 



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V.MJL J PRICES! 

Kodak, Argus. Keystone. Bell & Howell, etc. Carry- 
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and still. Thousands on hand. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
BUY DIRECT AND SAVE 

fn writing give make and model of case desired. 
EMPIRE MOTION PICTURE SCREEN CO. 
2287 East 15th St.. Brooklyn. N. Y. C. 
Cameras and Projectors Wanted — Highest Prices Paid 



I6MM. KODACHROME MOVIES 

"MOOSE" : 125' $18.75. "ROBIN'S NEST" : 34' $5. 
"GOLDEN-MANTLED GROUND SQUIRREL" : 50 
ft. $7.50. "SOARING SEAGULLS": 30' $4.50. "THE 
END", titles: 3 for $1. With fade-out. 50c each. 
Other subjects: Yosemite; The Blooming Desert: San 
Francisco. The Canadian Rockies. Wilclf lowers: at 
rate of 18c per foot — any length. 35mm. (2x2) 
SLIDES. 50c each: write for information. 

GUY D. HASELTON 
7936 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



PACE 158 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



FOR ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS! 

* Harrison CINE KIT 




4 FILTERS and DUAL-SNAP SHADE TO MEET 
ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS — both Kodachrome 
and Black and While. 

The new Harrison CINEKIT cumulus a special Aero 
l.nck King, a Dual-Snap Aluminum Sunshade, and the 
following de luxe Duraline Kilters: YL-6. GY-4, 
RD-4. and GR-4. Case Is of durahle 5-nz. ICIkhlde. 
fall lined. $6.95 and up. 



(if desired. Kndjrhrnme users 
may substitute a C-4 and 
MAZE filter fur any two of 

i he above. 



Write «nr Fr.e 
Illustrated Folder 
Today 



HARRISON & HARRISON 

OPTICAL ENGINEERS 
8351 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, Calif. 



CUT HOME MOVIE COSTS 

with BLACK and WHITE fine 
grain Semi-Orthochromatic Re- 
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lowest cost. 

16mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

100-ft noil, only $2.50 

Rating Scheiner 18 



ICmm. Projection Reel — 200 ft. reel — 35c each. 
Minimum order 6 reels 

Write fur prices for developing and processing for 
8mm. and 16mm. films bought elsewhere. 

Visual Instruction Supply Corp. 

1757 Broadway Dept. 12 Brooklyn, N. Y. 




HOME MOVIES 

Title Centering Guides 

Available for every popular make and 
model 8mm. and l&mm. cine camera are 
these simple centering guides that assure 
quick, accurate centering of camera with 
title board — regardless of size of title cards 
used. 

Centering guides, printed on durable 
paper stock, available for the following 
cameras: 

8MM. REVERE (ALL MODELS) 

8MM. MAGAZINE CINE KODAK 

8MM. SINGLE LENS FILMO 

8MM. CINE KODAK 20 

8MM. CINE KODAK 25 

8MM. CINE KODAK 60 

8MM. KEYSTONE 
I6MM. CINE KODAK "K" 
FILMOS— ALL "7055 MODELS 
I6MM. FILMO "121" 
I6MM. FILMO "141" 
I6MM. CINE KODAK E 
I4MM. VICTOR 

I6MM. KEYSTONE A3, A7 AND Bl 

BE SURE TO SPECIFY MAKE AND 
MODEL OF CAMERA WHEN 
ORDERING! 

10c 

EACH 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Boulevard 
HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 



Notice to Movie Fans 

If you take movies (8mm or 16mm) you simply cannot 
afford to be without a Free copy of the latest Photo Bar- 
gain Book now being distributed throughout the U. S. 
Lists all the best moving picture equipment from all 
the leading manufacturers, describes them. The prices 
save you money In many cases. You'll find the latest 
In lenses, screens, meters, projectors, cameras, film, 
tltlers, editing outfits, tripods, books on editing, 
titling, etc. This Bargain Book Is invaluable to you as 
an equipment REFERENCE book. Don't wait a day 
longer to send for your Free copy. Write us now. 

CENTRAL CAMERA COMPANY 
230 S. Wabash Dept. E-9 



Chicago, Illinois 



War 4 lamp movie *kou . • • 



• Continued from I'age 141 

dollar figure previously mentioned. 

We think this outstanding patriotic 
accomplishment by the Brooklyn Reel 
Fellows rates a special "E" award. We 
especially commend Larry Milella, presi- 
dent, for his over all management of the 
show. The Brooklyn Cine Club, who so 
graciously lent the amateur films 
screened on the program, also deserve 
?. measure of credit. 

The success of this "War Stamp Mov- 
ie Show" is certain to furnish incentive 
for many other amateur movie groups 
with a sincere desire to keep their hobby 
alive and at the same time direct their 
hobby toward aiding the war effort. 
That amateur movies are desirable en- 
tertainment capable of attracting cash 
customers is conclusively proved by 
this and other amateur motion picture 
exhibitions held recently throughout the 
country. The public in general is now 
quite home movie minded. They're in- 
terested in seeing good home movies 
made by serious amateur producers and 
will pay for the privilege. Add to this 
the fact you can augment such a pro- 
gram with timely subjects, comedies 
and cartoons such as the Castle Films 
subjects screened by the Brooklyn Reel 
Fellows, and it becomes at once appar- 
ent that public showing of 16mm. mov- 
ies with a patriotic purpose will click 
in any community. 

Imagine the aid accruing to our na- 
tional war effort if every amateur movie 
group would immediately organize and 
conduct a "War Stamp Movie Show." 
Even if they did not succeed in raising 
nearly nine thousand dollars, as did the 
Brooklyn Reel Fellows, the sale of war 
stamps and bonds would still be tre- 
mendous. 

Now that the Brooklyn Reel Fellows 
have shown the way, other Reel Fellow 
chapters and amateur cine groups can 
perform a similar service for their coun- 
try and for their hobby by promptly 
organizing and conducting "War Stamp 
Movie Shows." Some highly outstanding 
motion pictures have been produced by 
movie amateurs recently which ought 
to receive greater public exhibition. 
Here, then, is opportunity to display 
the fruits of artistic ability that exists 
in the ranks of the amateur movie hob- 
byist. Producers of these amateur films 
will gladly loan them for screening and 
Home Movies will assist any responsible 
amateur group interested in contacting 
makers of such films. 

War stamp movie show programs 
need not be confined strictly to amateur 
film productions. As in the case of the 



Brooklyn Reel Fellows, profesionally 
produced films may very well make up 
part if not all of the program. Today, 
it is possible to rent or purchase out- 
right from a wide list of distributors, 
excellent 16mm. silent or sound prints 
of professional films in a wide range of 
subjects. Castle Films probably offers 
one of the best selections for war stamp 
movie show purposes in view of the 
timeliness of their subjects and the 
compact footage which allows for a 
greater variety of subjects on the pro- 
gram. Such films as Castles' "Surrender 
At Stalingrad," "Yanks In Action," 
"Battle for Tunisia," and "U. S. Car- 
rier Fights Back," are made to order 
for war stamp movie shows. For, after 
viewing these pictures, every spectator 
cannot be but glad of the opportunity 
to buy war stamps and bonds to aid our 
nation's fighting men. 

cAnimating, 

T)itle* . . . 

• Continued from Page 139 

one half. In this case, 8 changes are 
made for each second of screening time, 
and two frames are exposed between 
changes instead of one. 

When movable letters are used, a 
horizontal title board is preferred, with 
the camera suspended vertically above 
it, shooting down. In this manner the 
letters and objects can be moved about 
with comparative ease. When lettering 
is to be painted, each new letter can be 
painted on title between exposures. 

A novel method of animating print- 
ed titles is accomplished by some film- 
ers as follows: Two impressions of the 
title are printed. One is set up in the us- 
ual manner, and then covered with a 
plain piece of paper. The other is cut 
up word by word or in any other man- 
ner desired. The camera is started and 
after a few frames have been exposed 
on the plain sheet of paper, the first 
word which has been cut out starts to 
tumble in from the lower corner, pho- 
tographed a frame or two at a time. 
When it reaches the approximate loca- 
tion of its counterpart, it is removed 
from the title area and the counterpart 
uncovered. The second word moves in 
in similar fashion, and upon reaching 
its location it, too, is discarded as its 
counterpart is uncovered. This contin- 
ues until all words have tumbled in and 
their counterparts have been uncovered, 
thus revealing a nice, printed title, well 
centered and with lines straight, etc, 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



PAGE 159 



Also, a title can be made to disappear 
by the same procedure. 

A discussion of title animation 
should include a word about writing the 
title in sand and having a big wave 
sweep over it and wash it away. On the 
screen, the wave washes over bare sand, 
then disappears, leaving the title in its 
wake. This trick title effect is accom- 
plished by filming with camera upside 
down and turning the film end for end 
before splicing. Try it next time you 
are at the lake or seashore. 



It might be well to add that most 
of the procedures mentioned will be 
greatly improved if the lettering is 
done in white ink upon a black back- 
ground, and the entire title then re- 
exposed upon a scenic or textured back- 
ground, preferably a static one, since 
there will be enough motion in the ani- 
mated title. A pictorial or figured back- 
ground will tend to "cover up" any un- 
evenness of motion, shadow lines, and 
ragged edges in the title that might 
otherwise show up on the screen. 



.Making family, movie* 



• • • 



• Continued from Page 14) 

to the many books, magazines, and 
dime-store booklets on the subject. 

For example, assume that we have 
movies of several relatives born under 
the sign of Libra. Preceding this group 
of shots, a title is inserted reading as 
follows: "For those born between Sep- 
tember 23 rd and October 22nd, their 
sun Libra tends to increase the social 
side of their nature, imbuing them with 
great love for the beautiful, a cheerful 
disposition, and independence." Most of 
those pictured in the shots that follow 
will resemble the astrological descrip- 
tions, but there will be exceptions and 
these, of course, will provide the hu- 
mor. Our audience needn't know any 
of the people in our movies. His interest 
will be purely in the contrasts between 
those pictured and the horoscopic sub- 
titles — much the same as if the movie 
was purposely staged. 

Sometimes a humorous short can be 
made from a collection of family shots 
with a little editing and adidtion of gag 
titles. Ideas for these titles may be 
found in cartoon illustrations which ap- 
pear in daily papers and in the pages of 
Colliers and other popular periodicals. 
One of the best descriptive gags I found 
for such a movie in a recent issue of 
Ladies' Home Journal. It follows: 

Her: George has a remarkable ap- 
petite!" 

'Nother Cat: Yes, his meals never 
bother him — except when he has 
to pay the check!" 
Now, my friend Peter Prentice is a 
plump soul. He appears as if he always 
ate plenty, and frequently. My movie 



FILMING THE BABY? 

Then you'll want the new booklet, 
"50 Continuity Ideas for Filming 
Children," now available at 25 cents 
a copy. Chuck full of new story ma- 
terial, running gags and ideas for 
short scenes, together with title 
drawings for use in typewriter titlers. 
Order today from Ver Halen Publi- 
cations, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



shot of him only shows him walking 
down the street but I value it for per- 
sonal reasons. He isn't known to my 
friends, so to screen this shot would 
mean nothing to them. But in order to 
keep this shot among my active, screen- 
able reels, I made up a title of the above 
gag and cut it in before the shot of 
Peter. 

"The Family Album Speaks" makes 
a good title for such a series of family 
and relative shots, and it suggests con- 
tinuity. Film the family album in close- 
up, showing it being opened and move 
in closer with camera to reveal a title 
on the first page that indicates it 
wishes, in the scenes to follow, to air 
opinions of the people it pictures. 

Another idea is to have one person, 
filmed in characteristic manner, intro- 
ducing some person out of scene. The 
introduction dialogue is by title and 
the person or persons introduced appear 
in the scenes immediately following. 
Thereafter, introductions are by means 
of spoken titles, it being assumed that 
the person shown originally offering the 
introduction continues to speak. This 
innovation, of course, offers wide lati- 
tude for use of the humorous titles made 
up from gags such as the one I used for 
shot of my friend, Peter Prentice. 

No matter how your family snap- 
shots are re-edited and arranged for 
general audience showing, the titles will 
carry the interest and lend continuity. 
You'll find that re-writing a simple, 
two-line joke into a suitable title is real- 
ly easy, once you get started. 

Of course, we may run into difficul- 
ties later when Aunt Zenobia pays a 
visit and insists upon seeing the movies 
we made of her — and finds, somewhat 
to her annoyance, that we have intro- 
duced her with a gag that implies she 
is a gossip or attributes to her some 
other dubious characteristic. It may 
tr.ke a little effort to convince her the 
humor effect was worth attaining and 
that after all, it was all in good, clean 
fun. 



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PHOTOSPOT 




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• 10' approved asbestos cord and switch 

• Burns 300, 500, 750 w. & Kodachrome lamp 

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• Valuable, expensive accessories include 
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BACK ISSUES 

The HOME MOVIES issues you missed con- 
tain much valuable movie making information 
you need. We can still supply a limited num- 
ber of back issues at original single copy price 
—25 cents. ORDER TODAY. 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 SUNSET BLVD. HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



PAGE 160 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 



8mm. -THE WORLD IN COLOR- 16mm. 

"WAIKIKI HULA GIRLS" Kodachrome projection 
scene $1.00. Kodachrome Slides and Movies for 
Grown ups; and Children. Most any subject. Color. 
Black and White. Silent or Sound. Latest Castle. 
Official. Hollywood film releases. Color Sample, com- 
plete lists 10c in coin. Stamp brings all catalogues. 

"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS" featuring stunning 
beauties. Majorettes in action and Bathing Clueens. 
SPECIAL Vol. 4. 50' 8mm. regularly $2.00 for $1.25; 
100' 16mm. regularly $4.00 for $2.50. Supply limited. 
Sample, complete lists. 10c in coin. Stamp brings all 
catalogues. No post cards, please. 

"PARTY PHONOGRAPH RECORDS"— New snap- 
py adult entertainment. Stamp brings catalogues. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
BAIA precision All-Metal 8mm. Film Slitter. $3.00 

BOLEX CIXELAC. film preservative, bottle 1.00 

BOLEX LENS CLEANER, bottle 35 

WELD-ALL FILM CEMENT, safety or nitrate .30 
FOTOFADE DYE for making Chemical Fades 1.25 

FOTOFADE WIPE-OFF TAPE, per roll 60 

CINETINTS. Set 6 Colors with Instructions ... 3.25 

DtiPOXT VISCOSE SPONGES, each 35 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
PERFORATING 16mm. films for double 8 

Cameras. 100 ft $2.00 

HOME MOVIES. Back Numbers. 1937-1938 15 

1940-1941-1942-1943 30 

1937— May. June. Aug.. Sept.. Dec. 1938— April. 
June. July. Aug.. Sept.. Oct. 1940 — March. April, 
May. June. July. Aug.. Oct.. Nov. 1941 — April. Nov.. 
Dec. 1942 — Feb.. April. May. June, July. Sept.. Oct. 
1943— Jan.. Feb.. March. April. 

CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS— Each 

Double 8. 50c Univex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS Double 8mm. and Single 8 size ... 10c 
MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FILM 
Laboratory Packed. Photoflood Light. Speed 6. 
Dbl. 8—33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; Sgl. 8—33 ft. 45c; 
100 ft. $1.00; 16mm. 100 ft. $1.25; 8mm. Clear. 
Salmon Pink. Lavender. 16mm. Clear. Red, Special 
Blue. These tints available while limited supply 
lasts. For duration, all will be clear base. 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orders 
Cash. Check or M. O. for quick service. 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 



t^jjt TO £V£PY 



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full with choicest bargains you 
ever saw. Daylight Leading Movie 
film as low as $1 per roll, pro- 
cessing included. Also bulk film, 
and dozens of bargains in acces- 
sories, screens, reels, titlers, etc. 
Contains BIG NEW LIST 166 film subjects, glam- 
our films, cartoons, westerns, historical, adven- 
ture and sports films for 8mm. and 16mm. Write 
today. Your name on postcard brings this handy 
book by return mail FREE! 

ESSCO FILM PRODUCTS 
3827 Archer Ave. Dept. H-5 Chicago 




Reversible Film, 100 Ft $2.00 

8mm. Double, 25 Ft $1.00 

PRICES INCLUDE PROCESSING 
Silly Symphonies, Charlie Chaplin and other 
features at l^c per foot for complete subject. 
Write today for our catalogue of finished subjects. 

EXHIBITOR'S FILM EXCHANGE 

810 Ninth Ave. Film Center Bldg.. N. Y. C. 



16mm SOUND on Film 

Recording Studio and Editing Facilities 
BERNDT-MAURER RECORDER 

GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 



995-A Merchandise Mart 



CHICAGO 



PB MOVIE FILTER KIT FOR COLORFILM 

for REVERE CAMERAS 

Including I Screw. in-Sunshade, I Haze Filter, 
I Type A Filter, I pouch 7C 
complete «f»t./ V 

Fr-m All Leading Camera Dealers or 

PONDER & BEST 

1 0 1 5 SO. GRAND AVE.. LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



graduate to a See ma nn 

3-star SPLICER ! 




ir Exclusive "Union 
pint" for greater 
Accuracy 1 
'jfr D r y emulsion 
•crape? — ideal tor 
Kodachrome! 

Anchored cement - cannot upset I 

n 




J4ow to make 
enlargement* . . . 

• Continued from Page 145 

ot balsa wood of the correct thickness 
and cemented it to cigar box. 

With my enlarging apparatus thus 
completed, next step was to make the 
enlargement. To do this, I removed lens 
board from my Graflex and inserted my 
ground glass in the film holder. Then, 
moving the Graflex toward the lens on 
cigar box until entire area was filled 
with image projected from the 16mm. 
test film, I locked my Graflex in place 
and prepared to make my first en- 
largement. While it becomes necessary 
to focus the cine lens carefully to in- 
sure sharpest possible enlargement, I al- 
so found that best results were obtained 
when lens was opened to widest apera- 
ture, i. e., f 1.9. 

The negative obtained from this set- 
up is a monochromatic translation from 
color to black and white. Therefore, it 
becomes necessary to use the slowest of 
Panchromatic film which is "color con- 
scious" as well as fine-grained. It must 
be slow speed to give time to work and 
a minimum chance of fogging from 
stray light, and fine grain to minimize, 
as much as possible, the ever-present 
granular appearance of negatives en- 
larged beyond their optical limits. 

The illustrated enlargements were 
first projected on 4"xj" Panatomic X. 
These were exposed for one second at 
f 1.9 and developed in Agfa 17 for 
i 1 minutes. Thus, they were over-ex- 
posed and given a minimum of devel- 
opment. By so doing, values were com- 
pacted and harsh contrast avoided. In 
making my enlarged prints, I used the 
two-developer technique which enabled 
me to control further graduation of 
values and contrast. Number 3 Brovira 
paper was used for the prints — a very 
contrasty paper with lots of sparkle. I 
found using the diffusion enlarger elim- 
inated much of the arti facts and les- 
sened necessity for retouching necessary 
afterwards; that it tended to disperse 
grain and softened and lent more gradu- 
ation of tone. 

One precaution that must be taken 
in making enlargements by this method 
is to paint all surfaces, facing the unex- 
posed film, flat black and to cover the 
area between camera and cine lens with 
a black cloth such as a regulation fo- 
cusing cloth, in order to shut out all 
stray light and prevent fogging film. I 
found it practical to use the focal plane 
shutter on my Graflex in making the 
exposures, otherwise it became necessary 
to time the exposures by count and to 
make the exposures by switching the 
light on and off. 



Of course, not every movie amateur 
wanting to make frame enlargements 
will have a Graflex at his disposal for 
a setup of this kind. However, other 
means may be used just as successfully 
for either 8mm. or 1 6mm films. The es- 
sential elements for making movie 
frame enlargements are: (1) suitable 
light source; (2) film gate and lens; 
and (3) cut film holder. Mounting all 
three on a baseboard, similar to the ar- 
rangement described here, will enable 
anyone to make good enlargements af- 
ter a little practice. 

Essentially, the principle consists sim- 
ply of projecting image of the 8mm. or 
1 6mm. frame upon a piece of panchro- 
matic cut film; developing the cut film; 
and making a paper print. 

Guard against fogging the cut film. 
This means housing the light, painting 
all surfaces black and working in the 
dark after focusing image on film hold- 
er panel and until exposed film is placed 
in a light-tight box to await developing. 

cAmateur film 

review* . . . 

• Continued from Page 1)6 

ence in trying to kill the rat, she takes 
the pistol from him to have a try at it 
and nonchalantly kills the rat with a 
single shot. There's not much plot to 
this, but it is an illustration how — if 
you want to make movies of the family 
in natural action instead of stiff, posed 
shots — you can, by using just a little 
imagination, turn out a very interesting 
reel of pictures. 

Produced by A. O. Furnans of De- 
troit, Mich., the picture runs 50 feet 
in 8mm. black and white film. It has 
been awarded a 2 -star merit leader. 

dreader 

Speak* . . . 

• Continued from Page 1)2 

its kind in the United States. We, of 
our staff, are mill workers and we are 
doing this service free for our boys and 
girls. The letters we receive are from 
our boys all over the world. — William 
F. Bartlett, Secy., 1569 Club, Benuood, 
W. Va. 

Windbacks 

Gentlemen: Have any of your readers 
designed and installed a backwind in the 
model K-8 Keystone camera? Will ap- 
preciate hearing from them with plans 
and suggestions. — Larry Otis, 628 Fire- 
stone Blvd., Noruudk, Calif. 

(Reader's commun cations with sug- 
gestions are invited. — Ed.) 



HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 

TITLES 

By EDMUND TURNER 




PAGE 161 

T 

JL HESE title cards, which are a regular feature of Home Movies each 
month, are designed especially for use with typewriter titles or any 
home-made titler that will photograph at a distance of 8 inches. 
Save all of them for future use. Cut them out and oaste on 
file cards, using rubber cement. 




MW 1 




PAGE 162 HOME MOVIES FOR MAY 

CLASSIFIED • ADVERTISING 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: More than ever — Cine Headquarters. 
You can depend on Bass. 

USED 8MM. CAMERAS 

Keystone 8, F:3.5 lens and case. $27.50. 
Cine Kodak 8 Model 20, F:3.5 lens and case, $30.00. 
Revere 88 with F:3.5 lens and case, $39.50. 
Bell & Howell Companion Double 8, F:3.5 lens and 
case, $44.50. 

USED I6MM. CAMERAS 

Simplex Pockette. magazine load. Kodak F :3 .5 lens, 
$27.50. 

Keystone Model A-3, F:3.5 lens, $31.50. 
Cine Kodak Model E, F:3.5 lens, $37.50. 
Keystone Model A-7, I" F:2.7 fixed focus lens. 
$39.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70A, Cooke F:3.5 lens and 
case, $47.50. 

Bell & Howell 121, I" F:2.7 fixed focus Cooke, case, 
$57.50. 

Cine Kodak Model B. interchangeable lenses, with 

F:l.9 lens, $59.50. 
Bell & Howell Model 75, F:2.7 Cooke fixed, and 

case, $60.00. 

Cine Kodak Model E, F:l.9 Kodak Anastigmat, 
$64.50. 

Victor 3 Turret, F:3.5 lens focusing mount, $67.50. 

S'mplex Pockette, with Kodak Anastigmat F:l.9, 
case, $69.50. 

Cine Kodak Model K. F:l.9 lens. $72.50. 

Cine Kodak Model B, 100 ft.. I" F:l.9 lens in fo- 
cusing mount, interchangeable 3%" Wollensak 
F:3.3, with case, $98.50. 

Victor Model 3 Turret, 15mm. Wollensak fixed focus 
F:2.7, I" Wollensak F:2.7. 2" Wollensak F:3.5 
and case. $125.00. 

Victor Model 5, critical focuser, with I" Cooke 
F:3.5 fixed focus, I" Wollensak F:l.5 focusing 
mount. 3" Berthiot Tele F:3.5, case, $157.50. 

Zeiss Movikon, Sonnar 1.4. coupled range finder, 
with rear diaphragm ring and case, $392.50. 

LENSES 

Hard-to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focal lengths up 
to 6" including Cooke, Hugo Meyer, Dallmeyer 
and complete stock of new Wollensak lenses from 
wide angle to 6". Write for quotations. 

DESIRABLE ACCESSORIES 

Bell & Howell Character Title Writer, latest model, 
with case, $25.00; old model, $15.00. 

Universal Titlers, made of aluminum, complete with 
magnifying letters, models for all standard cam- 
eras, each $6.95. 

Cinematographer's Handbook and Reference Guide 
!n stock $3.50. 

American Photographic Exposure Computor, $1.00. 

The Camera Photo Pocket Guide, $1.00. 

We buy 'em. sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 
stocks of new Cine Equipment all makes. Send 
for Bass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment 
up to date. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY. Dept. HC, 179, W. 
Madison St.. Chicago, Illinois. 



• I6MM. SILENT PROJECTOR— 750 watt Standard 
Projector with following features: 2" color-corrected 
lens, motor rewind, runs backward or forward, 
rheostat speed control, pilot light, removable film 
gate and easy-tilt control. Price $65.00. BOX 444, 
Home Movies Magazine, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood. Calif. 



• I6MM. SOUND-on-film recorders complete, 
Berndt Maurer variable area list $1650.00. Canady 
Variable Density list $1400.00. Will sell recorders 
only if wanted. Make offer. No fair offer refused. 
Guaranteed perfect condition. FILM ASSOCIATES, 
429 Ridgewood. Dayton, Ohio. 



HELP WANTED 



DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER 
wanted with practical experience in 8 and 16mm. 
cameras and projectors. "Permanent employment 
with large Chicago manufacturer now engaged in 
100% war work, with assured post war production. 
Excellent opportunity and substantial salary for 
right man. In first letter give age, experience, edu- 
cation, present employment and other qualifications. 
AM correspondence held in strictest confidence. Our 
organization knows of this ad. Box 334, Home 
Movies, 6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



• Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 

Turn it into cash with a Home Movies 
classified ad! 

RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing date, 
10th of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



WANTED 



• WANTED to buv used 16mm. sound projector, 
less amplifier and speaker. GRIFFIN FILM CO., 
Box 21, Ithaca, N. Y. 



FILM RELEASES 



• WORLD'S greatest 16mm. sound-on-film shorts 
with all the leading name bands and stars, includ- 
ing Gene Krupa, Tony Pastor, Will Bradley, Tommy 
Reynolds, Ray Kinney, Cab Calloway, Johnny Mess- 
ner. Charlie Spivak, Alvino Rey, Mitchel Ayres. 
Willie Howard, Lanny Ross, Gus Van, Barry Wood, 
King's Men, Borrah Minnevich, Hoosier Hot Shots. 
$7.50 per reel. State your choice, MULTIPRISES, 
Box 1125. Waterbury, Conn. 



• I6MM. SOUND Film Bargains! Large library of 
features and shorts being liquidated. All films new 
or like new. Send stamp for list. Act fast! They 
won't stay long. TED KRUGER, 4928 Ella St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 



BINDERS 

tor 



HOME MOVIES 



with 



YOUR NAME ENGRAVED 



$ 1.50 



Each binder holds 12 copies. Easy to 
insert or remove each magazine. In- 
valuable for those who save each 
copy for reference. 



We pay postage 



HOME MOVIES 



6060 Sunset Blvd. 



HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 



FILM RELEASES 



• EXCHANGE your 16mm. full subjects used or 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm. -16mm. subjects, 
cartoons, comedies. ABBE, 1265 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



• MONEYMAKER! "The Worlds Greatest Paision 
Play." 16mm. and 35mm. Specify sound or silent. 
Rent or purchase. Superior than Oberammergau- 
play. HEMENWAY FILM CO., 33-A Melrose St.. 

Boston, Mass. 



• 8-I6MM. SILENT and sound films. Cameras and 
projectors. Bought, sold, traded. Free Lists BOBS 
154 East 47th St., N. Y. C. 



• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged, bought 
sold, rented. Bargains always. New Free lists. 
FRANK LANE, 5 Little Bldg., Boston, Mass. 



• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New-used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins. REIDEL FILMS, 
Dept. HM-543, 3207 Josl/n Rd.. Cleveland. Ohio. 



• COMPLETE 16mm. sound subjects, perfect. $5.75. 
Odd sound reels, $2.00. All sizes film bought, sold, 
exchanged. Catalogues, sample film, 10c. INTER- 
NATIONAL. 2120 Straus. Brooklyn. N. Y. 



• 100' 16mm. used sound films, $1.00 postpaid. 
BLACKHAWK FILMS, Dept. HM5, Davenport. Iowa. 



• I BUY. sell, exchange S.O.F.. 8 and 16mm. 
films. Bargain list Free. HARVEY R. IRIS. Box 
539. Brockton, Mass. 



• GLAMOUR Newsreel No. 4, Majorettes, beauty 

queens 50 ft. 8mm., regularly $2.00, only $1.00 

(100 ft. 16mm., $2.50). Lists, samples, 10 cents. 
JENKINS 392, Elmira, N. Y. 



KODACHROME FILM RELEASES 



• KODACHROME Travel Films— latest releases 
now available for distribution in 8 and 16mm. Dime 
will bring color sample and listings. KENWOOD 
FILMS, 818 E. 47th St., Chicago. III. 



FILMS FOR EXCHANGE 



• BUY More Bonds and yet enjoy Better Films 
by adopting our inexpensive exchange plan: Silent 
pictures, $1.00 reel; sound $2.00. Also sell. Free 
catalogue. Selected sound program, reasonable 
rentals. Send for Victory B Bulletin. BETTER FILMS, 
742 New Lots Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



PROCESSING SERVICE 



• MOTION picture processing. 100' 16mm.. 75c: 

50 16mm.. 50c; 25' 8/8mm., 35c; 25' 8mm., 25c; 

RITTER FILM SERVICE. 629 Lyman Ave., Oak 
Park, III. 



TITLING 



• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit— Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16", 18". 20". 24". 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal fc 
general close-up photography. Complete kit $3.00. 
Separate lenses. 60c each. Also available in 6", 8", 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra-closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO.. 3221 So. 
Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



• TITLE your own films. This complete, illustrated 
book tells how. Shows how to build your own titler; 
how to develop positive titles; how to make trick 
titles, etc. Title lettering and composition explained. 
Replete with charts and tables on diopters, field 
areas, etc. Send $1.00 today for HOW TO TITLE 
HOME MOVIES, written by George Cushman. VER 
HALEN PUBLICATIONS. 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood. Calif. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



• STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! 'Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have a model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
prin'ed in authentic legal manner, 50 for 25c (coin) 
postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATI IONS 6060 Sunset 
Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



(Build a library, 0/ 

ANIMATED 
CARTOONS 

With film supplies diminishing, now is opportune time to 
build a library of films that will insure continued pleasure 
from your projector. Animated cartoons provide fun for all 
members of the family — especially these new animated car- 
toon releases only recently shown in the nation's theatres. 

Bosko 

CARTOONS IN SOUND 

15 Releases in 16mm. Sound 

Running Time Approximately 10 Minutes 
Available in Black and White or Color!! 




BLACK AND WHITE 


$17.50 


KODACHROME 


67.50 



Tale of Vienna Woods 2129-C 

Bosko's Parlor Pranks 2130-C 

Hey Hey Fever 21 31 -C 

The Lost Chick 2132-C 

Good Little Monkeys 2133-C 

Poor Little Me 2134-C 

The Old Plantation 2135-C 



The Old House 2137-C 

To Spring 2138-C 

Circus Daze 21 39-C 

Bosko and the Pirates 2140-C 

Bosko's Easter Eggs 2141-C 

Bosko in Bagdad 2142-C 

Bosko Cr the Cannibals 2143-C 



R 7, NO , s Bad Wolf 
Bosko's Bear 



1801-A 

'802-A 

e^os wks Escape::; — 

sot 0 -: ^ cW " 

Bosko': 



<o. 
Dream.. 

< a «''c Carpet 807 -A 




Oswald Rabbit . . . 

Walter Lantz's lovable cartoon character, Oswald Rabbit, is at his best 



in this 8m 


m. and 16mn 


i. series of 






in young 




24 Releases 


in 8mm. s 


50-Foot 


— 16mm. 


$1.50 


25-Foot 


— 8mm. 


.75 



100-Foot — 16mm $3.00 

50-Foot — 8mm 1.50 



REMEMBER the Oswald Rabbit car- 
toons shown in theatres? They're now 
available in condensed versions for 
8mm. and 16mm. home projectors. 
Ask your dealer for a demonstration 



screening 



Elmer Catches Cold 26-Z 

The Speed Cop 29-Z 

Oswald the Boxer 32-Z 

No Dogs Allowed 34-Z 

The Big Fight 35-Z 

Oswald's Pup 36-Z 

The Roller Skater 37-Z 

Oswald the Champion 38-Z 

Oswald's Decoy 41 -Z 

The Quints' Birthday 45-Z 

Oswald's Mystic Dream 47-Z 

Oswald the Hill-Billy 49-Z 



The Duck's Birthday 6-A 

Doctor Oswald 9. A 

Sniffs and Sniffles 1 0-A 

The Fairyland Express 1 1 -A 

Adventures in Dreamland 12-A 

C-Man Oswald 13-A 

Bo Peep's Sheep 1 4- A 

Oswald the Hunter 17-A 

The Radi© Bug 18-A 

Oswald the Bug Charmer 19-A 

The Magic Wand 21 -A 

Remote Control 23 -A 



WRITE 
FOR 



HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES 




"Within the hour'l. through JEbxiyk and Wirephoto 
you SEE the news happen 



It's a "hot news' 1 photograph. 

It is wrapped around a cylinder, locked 
in a machine about the size of your cabinet 
radio. The flick of a switch, and the cylin- 
der begins to turn. 

The same switch starts similar cylinders, 
each with a wrapping of photographic film, 
in scores of other cities, where newspapers 
use the Wirephoto service. 

Have you seen the cylinder record re- 
volving under the needle in a modern dic- 
tating machine? That illustrates how the 
cylinder in the Wirephoto sending machine 
spins under its recording "needle*\ . . 

But the needle is a noiseless ray of light. 

It lights a tiny path around the spinning 
cylinder. Over and over. 200 turns to an 
inch. And the reflection of this light from 
the picture is actuating a photoelectric cell 
which converts the reflected rays into elec- 
tric impulses. 

In each receiving machine, these electrical 



impulses control a neon light. Through a 
powerful lens, this light is focused to a pin- 
point path around the film. As the film is 
exposed to the light, it becomes a prac- 
tically perfect negative of the positive pic- 
ture in the sending machine. 

"EXTRA! EXTRA!" If the event is big 
enough, and censorship permits, "within the 
hour" you see in your home-town paper the 
pictures which a news photographer snapped 
hundreds or thousands of miles awav. 

Associated Press Wirephoto, widi Kodak's 
help, within a few short years has brought 
the electrical transmission of photographs 
from comparative crudity to its present 
near-perfection. 

KODAK S PART WAS . . . 
to produce a photographic film uith qualities 
unlike any other, uhich uould "process" in 
a fraction oj the usual time . . . and a lens of 



sufficient pou er to focus the faint gradations 
of "cold" neon light on a pinpoint of spin- 
ning film, u ith complete fidelity. 

The job has been done so well drat you can see 
litde difference in quality between a picture snap- 
ped in North Africa — and transmitted by wireless 
and wire — and a picture made in your citv. and 
delivered to your newspaper on the original film. 

Portable sending machines — die size of a suit- 
case — have recendy been perfected. Thev can send 
out a photograph or map over any telephone or 
radio transmitter. 

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TOWARD FIGHTING 
THE WAR? News pictures for us at home, of 
course, with all the importance to public morale 
of getting the news while it"s "new". . . 

Plus the vital neu ~ lime" farter in strategt — the 
abilitj of these in cur Command, uith today s battle 
scenes and maps before their eyes, to direct ncu- the 
next movements of troops and ships and planes. 

The details are confidential, but you can be 
sure that our Army and Navy are using this 
"weapon against time" to the limit . . . Eastman 
Kodak Company. Rochester. K V. 



Serving human progress through Photography 



YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, $2.50 




JUNE • 1943 



LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY AMATEUR MOVIE MAGAZINE! 





H 



OW the boys in the service do appreciate those 
movies from home! 



There is no finer service that an amateur 
movie maker can render than taking movies to 
send to men and women in our armed forces. To 
those who are away from home in training camps, 
motion pictures are like the Magic Carpet of Sind- 
bad's famous legend. They erase distances and 
bring from hundreds of miles away the loved 
ones he longs to see. There on the screen, through 
the modern medium of home movies, the service 
man can watch his family and friends walking, 
playing, working in the garden and actually doing 
the things about which they have written him. 

Because 8 mm. projectors are available in practi- 
cally every camp and U. S. O. center, these thrill- 
ing life-like home movies can be enjoyed again and 
again. Wherever the service man or woman may 
be transferred, the compact reels of 8 mm. film 
can be carried easily and take up little space among 
personal belongings. 

If you own a movie camera and take movies for 
friends', relatives' or neighbors' sons or daughters 
who are in the service, you may be sure that you 
are really helping the war effort — that you are 
using precious film for a worthy cause. 8 mm. 
home movies cost little (only about ioc per scene), 
but they bring happiness that can't be measured 
in monetary value. Revere Camera Company, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



SHARE Your Pleasure In Your Movie 
Equipment! 

Because most manufacturers of movie cameras and projectors, 
like Revere, are engaged ioo'i in war work, the supply of 
equipment just won't go around to every- 
one who wants it. It is especially necessary, 
therefore, that everyone who owns a camera 
or projector share his pleasure in it with 
others. Your Revere 8 mm. Camera and 
Projector are sturdily built to stand the extra 
service of wartime sharing. Use your Revere 
Projector as often as you like to show movies 
for service men and women, movies for 
Civilian Defense and Red Cross activities. 






kmc 




BUY 

WAR BONDS 

*"ery Pay D ay ! 



DVISORY EDITORS 



. A. K. BAUMCARDNER 

Peoria Cinema Club 

— ER BEZEK 

Chicago Cinema Club 

AMES BIALSON 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Louis 

! MOSS BROWN 

Dallas Cinema Club 

*LTER BRACKEN 

The Me Movie Club, Philadelphia, Pa. 

EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographers 

SSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema Club 

RIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Club 

- THl/R E. CIBBS 

Portland Cine Club 

r|y a. hook 

Seattle 8mm. Club 

(- 1 FRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Club 

| .;. NESTELL 

Cinemen Club 

h RCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

C.BERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 

THEO. ROTH 

Sherman Clay Movie Club 

0. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm. Movie Club 

l.'AUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

RiD E. SNYDER 

Dei Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 

K F. SISSEL 

Austin Movie Club 

CRTIS 0. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 



E>red as Second-Class Matter, May 6, If38, at 
tt Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

S scription rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
c ies 25c. Advertising rates on application. 



. home 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Copyrighted 1943 and published monthly by Ver Halen Publications, 

publishers of Home Movies, National Photographic Dealer, and 

Hollywood Motion Picture Review. No part of contents may be 

reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR JUNE, 1943 

INFORMATION PLEASE I 68 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS By J. H. Schoett I7O 

let's film our victory garden — By Peter S. Bezek 173 

YOUR PROJECTOR HOW TO LENGTHEN ITS LIFELINE 

— By Wm. J. Gatti 174 

PROCESSING BUGABOOS AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 

— By George W. Cushman 176 
blue-printing your photoplay — By Gale Neblett 177 

CAMERA ANGLES FILMLESS PRACTICE PROJECT FOR JUNE I78 

are your titles properly placed? — By George W. Cushman ... 179 

LENGTHEN LIFE OF YOUR PHOTOFLOODS By H. A. Hemel l8o 

GADGFTEER'S APPARATUS SIMPLIFIES ANIMATION 

— By Arthur M. Sharp 181 

EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP I 8 2 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW 1 84 

title troubles — By George W. Cushman 188 

THE READER SPEAKS I 92 

home movie titles — By Edmund Turner _ 193 

PHOTO CREDITS: Pg. 173, Harold M. Lambert; 176, Wm. Bornmann; 
177, Montreal Am. Movie Club; 178. (top) E. J. Eisenmeier, (center) 
Harry Meyers, (bottom) E. J. Eisenmeier; 17?, Hollywood Film Enter- 
prises; 180, H. A. Hensel; 181, Arthur M. Sharp. 



JUNE 



CHAS. ). Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. J. Ver HALEN, JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 
6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone GRanite 5149 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
Everett Gellert, 62 West 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 




NUMBER 6 
VOLUME X 



REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. CAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORCE W. CUSHMAN 
J. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 



HOLLYWOOD'S 



M A C A Z I N E 



FOR 



THE 



MOVIE 



AMATEUR 



PACE 168 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



MAKE A 



rr 



DURATION" FILM RECORD 

OF THE FAMILY 



9 



First Aid ! 




Craig Senior Splicer 

... is used for oil 8mm. 
ond 16mm. sound or si- 
lent film — four simple 
operations without wet- 
ting film — gives you 
permanent splices — 
guaranteed to stick — 
has cutter and a dry 
scraper, priced $10.95 
complete. 



Croig Junior Splicer 

...is easy to use — it's 
adoptable for either 
8mm. or 16mm. film. 
Complete with bottle of 
Croig Safety Film Ce- 
ment and water con- 
tainer. Mounted on 
hardwood base — light, 
compact and efficient. 
Lists $3.95. 

Edit your "Duration" 
film record with Craig 
Home Movie Equipment 
— see your photo deoler 
NOW! 



CRAIG MOVIE SUPPLY CO. 

Lov^ngeles San Francisco Seattle 




Greetings all you 
camera hounds, 
if you are going "out of 

bounds" friend Bass will buy your stuff today, 
so send it down without delay, for used equip- 
ment Bass still hollers . . . and pays for it with 
good hard dollars. 



PRESIDENT 
• Headquarters for new and used 
FILMO. BOLEX. REVERE. CINE KO- 
DAK AND CINE KODAK SPECIALS 
AND PRO|ECTORS 



Write Dec 



information please 





Frame Enlargement's ^Robt. F. Mil- 
ler, Lorain, Ohio.) 

O: A friend uho has a plyoto graphic 
enlarger and dark room has agreed to 
make up some frame enlargements from 
my movie film. He would like to know 
if you have any ad i ice to offer as to 
correct exposure to allow in making 
these enlargements. He plans to use 
TripleS pan pint with a G-E Tungsten 
speed of 200. 

A: So many factors must be consid- 
ered when making up enlargements in 
the manner described that it is almost 
impossible to give dependable exposure 
drta. Te recommend that your friend 
employ the old reliable test-strip meth- 
od to determine correct exposure — same 
as he would do in determining exposure 
for a paper enlargement. He can lay a 
piece of cardboard over the cut film, 
exposing only a narrow strip, say 1 2 " in 
width, then move cardboard to expose 
an additional strip until several expo- 
sures have been made on the one panel 
of cut film. Developing the film will en- 
able him to determine the correct ex- 
posure by close inspection of the vari- 
ous strips. 

Lap Dissolves (Jos. H. Gawler, Wash- 
ington, D. C.) 

Q: From time to time, I lyaic noticed 
mention made in Home Movies that 
lup-dissolves can be made successfully 
with the Eastman model 90 Magazine 
Cine Kodak. I presume tins is accom- 
plis/yed by fading-out, turning maga- 
zine 01 er, capping the lens, running off 
the amount of film used in tlye fade-out 
(tlye u inding-back process), tlyen re- 
placing magazine in original position 
and fading-in on the next scene. Hou ■ 
ei er. when I mentioned this procedure 
to my local camera dealer, lye warned 
me ttyat such practice would result in 
scratching my film. 

A: We have seen hundreds of lap-dis- 
solves made in this way and know of 
no instance where the process caused 
scratching of film. 

Ground Glass R. O. Lund, Bremer- 
ton, Wash'n.) 

O: J lyave constructed a tfyrough-the- 
lens tiewing deiice for my Smm. Maga- 
zine camera, but am hai ing trouble lo- 
cating a suitable glass material to pro- 
tide the lieu ing image. I have tried va- 
rious grades of flashed opal glass but 
except for extremely bright scenes 
viewed ufyen my lens is opened to f/2.7 
or f 1.9, there is not sufficient light 
reaching the glass to enable distinguisb- 



• Readers: This department is for your 
benefit. Send in your problems and our 
technical board of professional cameramen 
uill ansuer your question in these col- 
umns. If an ansuer by mail is desired, 
enclose addressed stamped en\ elope. 



ing image. .You 1 am using a piece of 
ground glass such as used in a ^"xy" 
1 iew camera, but this is so grainy it is 
almost impossible to tell wlycn lens is in 
s/yarp focus. Can you recommend a 
more suitable material for tlye ground 
glass? 

A: Your best bet is to obtain a piece 
of matt-finish celluloid. This is thinner 
than glass and the rough side is of much 
finer grain than the finest-grained 
or sand-blasted glass. Write to Cellu- 
loid Corp'n. of America for this. (See 
your telephone directory for nearest 
branch office address.) 

Where ground glass only is available, 
try oiling the ground surface with a 
few drops of mineral oil, rubbing it in 
evenly over surface. This will improve 
transmission of light through glass, 
sharpen up the image. 

Split-Stage Shot i Bon J. Perlman, 

New York, N. Y.) 

O: / would like to know whether or 
not a mask or split screen is necessary 
in order to film a double exposure of one 
person. I tried to get tlye desired effect 
uitlyout using tlye mask, but in tlye final 
result, the film has a hazy, was/yed-out 
appearance on tlye screen. 

A: assume the effect you desire 
is dual or split-stage shot in which the 
same person appears as "twins" on the 
screen. This effect does require use of 
a split mask unless the shot is made 
against a black velvet drop. See page 
148 of the May issue for a suggestion 
you may use for this purpose. It in- 
volves use of typewriter titler and plac- 
ing of simple paper masks in the title 
card holder. 

Dupe Prints v Henry C. Woltman. 
Vest Brighton, N. Y.j 

O: In making a duplicate copy of a 
reiersal print on ret ersal film, u bat 
causes the finish ed dupe print to be 
slightly out of focus? 

A: When making duplicate prints it 
is necessary to thread films into printing 
machine with emulsions in contact — 
i.e., with emulsion of raw stock facing 
emulsion of negative or existing reversal 
• Continued on Page 1 9 1 



HOME MOVIES FOR |UNE 



PACE 169 




NOW OW CHSriE FiUHi 




Here's a thrilling record of Doolittle's historic flight! 
See the amazing details of the start of the Tokyo raid! 
See the guns of the storm-tossed "Shangri-La" blast a Jap 
patrol boat from the raging sea! Then — the astounding 
take-off of the giant bombers. 

Cheer with the Hornet's crew as the big planes clear 
the deck and head for Tokyo! See the dramatic end of 
this history-making flight in China as Madame Chiang 
Kai-shek decorates General Doolittle and his heroic 
men! Own this sensational movie! Show it now! 




Fly with MacArthur's fighting Yanks! Join the Amer- 
ican bombing crew! See the sinister Jap armada! Then, 
like an avenging thunderbolt hurl your plane into ac- 
tion! Press the bomb button. See an enemy ship go up in 
flames! Shoot down a Zero! 

See ship after ship in the Nip flotilla bombed to de- 
struction! See battered and burning hulks litter the sea! 
Land-based planes versus seapower, with airpower scor- 
ing an amazing victory! Here is the record of the destruc- 
tion of 22 Jap ships, 102 Jap aircraft, 15,000 Japs! It's an 
American epic! Own it now! 




Each a complete and separate movie of a major battle action 

/ 



Castle Films' War 
0 Films Folder, describ- 
ing movies of every important battle action 
of World War II. Let it help you start your 
film library of World War II. Check below to 
receive it. 



DON'T WAIT! SEE YOUR PHOTO DEALER — 
OR SEND HIM THIS HANDY ORDER FORM TODAY I 

All Castle 16mm. films are Vap-O-Rated. All Castle 8mm. films are also treated. 




' — - ORDER FORM 




Please send Castle Films in the size and length indicated. 



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Sound 
$ 17 50 


Yanks Bomb 
Tokyo 












Bismarck 
Sea Victory 













Send Castle Films' FREE War Films Catalog □ 



PAGE 170 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 




CRAFTSMEN 



The production line of "GOERZ 
AMERICAN" is formed by skilled 
men, who through painstaking work 
create high-grade photo-lenses and opti- 
cal units for military instruments used by 
our armed forces. 

on Land — 

on the Sea — 

in the Air — 

These precise optical units are of the 
greatest importance to our armed 
forces, for without accurate military 
instruments for sighting, fire control and 
photographic aerial reconnaissance their 
fighting machinery would be of little 
value to them. 

aptical science together with our 
craftsmen, doing their duty on the 
job in the production line, will hasten 
victory. 

aur production is keyed to fill the re- 
quirements of our Government. With- 
in limitations we may still be able to 
supply "GOERZ AMERICAN" lenses of 
certain types and sizes for civilian use. 
We suggest yeur inquiries. 

Address 

Dept. HM-6 



C. P. GOERZ AMERICAN OPTICAL CO. 

Office and Factory 
317 East 34th Street New York 16, N. Y. 

PRECISION OPTICS 

\ U+ioe fS99 

★★★*★★★★★*★★★★★★★★★* 



REVIEWS. .. 



of cAmateur film £ 



B y 



S C H O E N 



"FlGHTING the War At Denny's 
House" is an excellently photographed 
picture depicting the average family's 
trials and tribulations during war time. 
The children want to go for a ride in 
the family car but Dad finds its out of 
gas. Dad mixes himself a cooling drink, 
but can't have enough sugar to make 
it sweet. 

Two faults predominate in the pic- 
ture, however. One is that the filmer 
often held his camera on some of the 
action too long and 
most of these scenes 
were not trimmed at 
time of editing. The 
other was lack, of 
sufficient rehearsal 
of the cast to insure 
more natural per- 
formance before the 
camera. The chil- 
dren, especially, are 
obviously being di- 
rected from the 
camera. 

Regarding the first 
fault, the camera 
should never be held 
on the action longer 
than necessary to re- 
cord the part most 
important to the 
story. Allow just enough footage to get 
the idea across, then cut directly to the 
next scene. 

Use of more re-action shots of the 
children would accelerate continuity. 

The picture runs 400 feet in 16mm. 
black and white and was produced by 
Edward C. Denny. It received a 3 -Star 
merit leader. 

The Campbells Are Coming" is 
premised on a good story idea that in- 
volves a father, mother and their 
twelve-year-old son. It is one of those 
Sundays when Dad wants to take it 
easy, loaf and read the Sunday paper, 
etc. Son isn't in the mood to do much 
either. The phone rings, and mother 
announces neighbors are calling — evi- 
dently some unliked by Dad and son — 
for they indicate lack of enthusiasm. 
However, mother orders them to wash 
and dress while she tidys up the room. 
The day wears on and Dad and Son 



it EVERY filmer of amateur movies, 
whether a subscriber or not, is invited 
to submit his films to the editors for 
review and helpful criticism. This free 
service applies to any type of picture 
whether it be your first movie or a 
pretentious photoplay effort. Aim of 
this service is to help you make better 
pictures. 

Reviewed films will be rated I, 2 
and 3 stars. Those rating 2 or 3 stars 
will receive Free an animated leader 
indicative of its merit, lest film re- 
viewed each month will receive a spe- 
cial certificate award as the Movie 
of the Month. 

All films are returned promptly by 
insured express together with merit 
leaders and special analysis report. 



sit dejectedly reading while awaiting 
the expected visitors. Dad, meantime, 
gets a bright idea, letters a sign and 
treks it on the front door. Resuming 
his place in the parlor, he continues 
reading. Mother, meanwhile grows 
alarmed by neglect of visitors to show 
up. Comes evening, and she goes outside 
to see if her guests are coming up the 
walk. It is then she discovers the rea- 
son. Dad hung a "Smallpox" sign on the 
fiont door. When she confronts him 
with his trick, she 
smiles as if to indi- 
cate she didn't espe- 
cially care whether 
the visitors showed 
or not, kisses Dad af- 
fectionately. 

In this picture 
where the lapse of 
time of a whole day 
was to be conveyed, 
it should have been 
shown in interval se- 
quences or some 
time-lapse device 
should have been 
employed to make 
the progression of 
time more clear. The 
simple use of a close- 
up of a clock would 
have suited the purpose, regardless how 
often it had to be repeated. 

In the picture, the story has pro- 
gressed considerably before it is evi- 
dent that many hours have passed. In 
other words, the camera plays almost 
continuously on the trio seated in the 
living room instead of cutting back 
and forth to some device as suggested 
above. 

Photography of the interiors is very 
well done. Titling is a masterful job, 
especially execution of the dissolves, 
wipes, etc. The picture runs 100 feet in 
8 mm. black and white and was pro- 
duced by Louis C. Muller. It has been 
awarded a 2 -Star merit leader. 

''Boyhood Days" is a 3 Star 16mm. 
Kodachrome movie produced by W. H. 
Nordin, a one-time Movie of the Month 
winner. Two boys take a trip out into 
the country with their dog. Bringing 
along their fishing poles and lunch in a 
• Continued on Page 192 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PACE 171 



Big News For Movie Amateurs! 



Two Booklets full 
of lew Filming Ideas! 



If your problem is lack of filming ideas these two 
booklets will supply what you need! They're packed 
with practical home movie plots that are easy to shoot 
and certain to make your movies more entertaining. 





Anyone can make movies of kiddies, but how many start 
filming with any idea of interesting continuity? Here's a new 
book filled with filming ideas for children's movies, pub- 
lished at the request of thousands of HOME MOVIES' readers 
who recognize a need for such helpful service. Don't shoot 
another foot of film until you've read this book — -gotten an 
idea that'll make your children's movies the talk of the 
town! Its complete, too, with several art main titles. 
Only 25c, postpaid. 



If you're plotting a movie of your 
vacation, or want to heighten in- 
terest in last year's vacation film 
with a good running gag, this 
booklet offers 50 fresh profession- 
ally conceived filming ideas that 
any amateur can use. Replete with 
interesting and humorous contin- 
uity plots, ideas for running gags, 
plus several timely art Vacation 
titles, its a lot of value for only 25c. 



Order NOW! 

...use this coupon 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Calif. 
Gentlemen: 

Enclosed please find cents for which please send 

postpaid copies of "50 Ideas for Vacation Films" 

and copies of "50 Ideas for Filming Children." 



Name . 



Address 

City 



State 



3-43 



PACE 172 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 




.turn their binoculars this way ! 



IN the meager security of a rubber raft, 
survivors from a lost plane count 
ahead: How many more days will their 
food and water last? They count back: 
How many days have they drifted — 
auay from their chances for rescue? 
Count their chances to live: 

Then — so far off. it can barely be identi- 
fied as one of our own — a single plane. 

Saved? Not yet! 

Only with binoculars could the men in 
the plane possibly see them. 

Those on the raft, fliers themselves, 
know that. Know that they have not 
yet been seen, or the plane would be 
heading towards them now. Fear that 



those up there who are using binoculars 
are too intent on sighting their objec- 
tive to spot that tiny raft. 

If so, their frantic waving is as futile as 
their shouts, and only prayers can help: 
"Please, Lord! Turn their binoculars 
ihis way!" 

Every minute of every hour of every 
day and night, our men are using binoc- 
ulars to save lives, uncover ambushes, 
expose snipers, warn of submarines, 
sight enemy aircraft. 

Wherever your boy is, binoculars are 
keeping watch — helping him and his 
comrades to destroy our enemies, and 
hasten Victory. 



THESE FIGHT TOO! Universal is one of the 
few manufacturers making binoculars 
for the U. S. Army, Navy and Marines, 
and for the Unit- 
ed Nations. 
It has pio- 
neered in- 




genious new 

methods of 

production 

and assembly of lenses, prisms and 

precision optical instruments — many 

of them significant contributions to 

America's future leadership in this 

highly specialized field. 

KBMEMBER YOUR PLEDGE 
TO BUY WAR BONDS, AND LIVE UP TO IT! 




\/n i verbal Camera [n red ration 



There's only one flag 
tce're prouder of! 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



HOLLYWOOD 



Makers of Precision Photographic and Optical Instruments 



Peacetime Manufacturers of Cinemaster, Mercury, Corsair Cameras 



HOME MOVIES 

Published in Hollywood 
JUNE 1943 



P, 



ERHAPS you have already 
started your Victory garden — probably 
hive enjoyed some of the vegetables 
trom it already. But have you started 
your Victory Garden movie? It's not 
too late to begin filming your garden or 
that of your neighbor for it offers a sub- 
ject for year 'round filming and a wide 
variation of approach. 

Most of us will choose to film the 
subject in other than a strictly serious 
vein which means we'll follow the pro- 
gress of our garden from a humorous 
angle. Many of us planted Victory gar- 
dens last year so we have a year's ex- 
perience to draw upon for our plot. 
What was there about the work in the 
garden last year that made it so much 
fun? What were the incidents involv- 
ing our friends that we talked about 
long after our garden ceased to exist? 
Let's reminisce a bit. 

First there were those neighbors who 
paused to belittle our venture, offer ad- 
vice, or perhaps take a turn at the shov- 
el or hoe. Invariably there was the wise- 
acre who "knows soil" and predicted 
our garden plot doomed to failure — 
adding that he'd never be caught plant- 
ing a garden there. All of these inci- 
dents can be re-enacted again this year, 
purposely staged to give our garden 
film a humorous twist. 

Suppose we select our cast and start 
shooting our Victory garden picture 
this week end. There's the hapless hus- 
band who'll spade the garden reluctant- 
ly, prodded by a scheming wife whose 
sole aim in planting a garden is the 
opportunity it affords to display before 
her neighbors, chic gardening togs pur- 
chased especiallyfor the occasion. Or we 
can show the husband, a little too am- 
bitious, perhaps, marking off a large plot 
of ground to spade, then gradually 
shortening his lines as he finds spading 
tough going, until at last its down to a 
little two by four plot. 

Let's show the wife decked out in 
gardening togs, too pretty for soiling, 
going about the business of planting 
seeds, hoeing, watering, etc., in a coy, if 
rot too dainty manner. Let's "hoke it 




• Victory qa r ens are as rich in filming opportunities as they are in 
vitamins, so it you're wondering how to keep your movie camera 
busy this summer, consider the summer-long activities your garden 
affords. 



J^et% film our 

VICTORY G1RDM! 



B y 



PETER 



up," as they say in Hollywood, ,ind 
make it as humorous as possible. 

Of course we'll want to ring in the 
neighbors on the fun, sc we show the 
wiseacre sounding off about the poor 
soil, etc. Insert a title in which he seri- 
ously says: "I ain't gonna waste no time 
on a Vict'ry garden!" then cut direct- 
ly to a shot showing this same fellow 
being handed a spade by his wife and 
ordered to start digging. 

Another variation of this type of 
character is the neighbor who knows all 
about gardening and tells us we're 
Planting too early, that our rows are too 
far apart, that we're putting in seeds 
too deep, weeding wrong, thinning 
plants too much or not enough and so 
on. We listen first to one then the other 
until we don't know whether we're 
coming or going! 

We'll picture those other neighbors, 
too, kindly friends who stop by to lend 



S . B E Z E K 

a hand or enthuse over the progress 
of our planting. Here we must avoid 
posing and prevent our friends from 
appearing self conscious before the cam- 
era. So we give them something partic- 
ular to do and gently remind them not 
to look at the camera. What more nat- 
ural way can we picture the prized re- 
sults of our garden — those luscious red 
radishes, long carrots, plump turnips — 
than to have a neighbor or member of 
the family actually pick them and hold 
them up to see. (Followed by suitable 
closeups, of course!) And later, at "har- 
vest time," people again add interest in 
little acts of neighborliness when we 
bring over a head of lettuce or perhaps 
a dozen ears of freshly picked corn for 
their table. 

And now for some gags that will add 
humor to our film. Many of these can 
be filmed later in the season. The back- 
• Continued on P«%? i X9 



173 



PAGE 174 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



\m PROJECTOR 

J4ow to lengthen it% lifeline . . . . 



Manufacturing has stopped 
and replacement parts 
are scarce! So take care 
the one you have... 

C A T T I 



of 

B y 



WILLIAM | . 

Illustrations by the Author 




• Too much oil is as harmful as too little. Apply oil sparingly to projector 
as directed by the manufacturer — but oil it regularly! (Below) Projectors 
don't smoke but the lamps do and when inside of projector bulb becomes 
too black, light volume reaching screen is reduced considerably. Replace 
blackened bulbs and increase screen brilliance. 




lOW that production of projectors for civilian 
use has ceased for the duration, your projector becomes 
more valuable than ever as a piece of equipment that can- 
not be immediately replaced nor replacement parts read- 
ily had for it. It is timely, therefore, that every projector 
owner go over his machine carefully now in a minute 
checkup with the object of prolonging its usefulness. 

Most projectors, silent as well as sound, are seeing in- 
creased use. Screening of home movies is more frequent in 
homes, now that gas rationing curtails other activities, 
and an increasing number of movie amateurs are regular- 
ly showing civilian defense and O.W.I, films in public 
screenings. Unless these projectors are oiled and inspected 
.it regular intervals, some of them are apt to fail and then 
it may be the storeroom for them for the duration. 

Its easy to procrastinate on this inspection and oiling 
business, so let's make it a point to get out our projector 
tonight and check it over. Let us divide the check-up ac- 
cording to the six most important points as follows: 

OIL: Oil can either be an aid or a hindrance to smooth 
operation of any projector. Some believe the more oil they 
put on a projector's bearings the longer the machine will 
last. This is far fram the truth. Play safe and apply only 
the amount specified and at the frequency specified by the 
manufacturer. Too much lubrication will invariably cause 
oil to be transferred to the film as it passes through pro- 
jector; cause dust to collect on oily areas to clog gears or 
scratch the film. 

If inspection reveals dirt and dust have already collect- 
ed, this should first be removed with a solvent such as 
carbon-tetrachloride applied with a discarded toothbrush. 
After this cleaning, oil may be applied according to man- 
ufacturer's recommendation. 

Projectors equipped with lubrication tubes that carry 
oil to remote parts of the mechanism, as with Eastman 
projectors, should be carefully checked to make sure these 
tubes are not clogged. A pipestem cleaner is a good imple- 
ment for this job. If a gummy residue has accumulated 
in the tubes, it may be dissolved with carbon-tetrachlo- 
ride solvent. 

It is unnecessary and inadvisable to remove any gears or 
other moving parts in order to lubricate the machine. 
Most projector mechanisms are "timed" at the factory 
and to attempt to remove any part may result in having 
to return it to the factory for adjustment. 

ILLUMINATION: First step is to check the projec- 
tion lamp. If it's badly blackened it's not rendering effi- 
cient service and should be replaced. Otherwise check fila- 
ment position to make sure lamp is seated for maximum 
light efficiency. Many projectors provide adjustment of 
the lamp base so lamp may be moved to bring filament in 
line with exact center of condenser lens. This adjustment 
is made with the room darkened and the projector fo- 
cused upon the screen. Where lamp is out of focus, a 
dark image similar to pattern of the filament will ap- 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PAGE 175 



pear on the screen. Moving the lamp forward or back- 
ward or to either side will bring it into proper focus and 
it should then be locked securely in this position. 

BELTS: If take-up and rewind belts are covered with 
oil or dirt, remove them and clean with solvent applied 
with toothbrush. After considerable use, spring belts 
may stretch and render inefficient service. This may be 
remedied by shortening the belt, removing a small sec- 
tion, then splicing it together again. There's a right and 
a wrong way to do this, of course. Using a pair of wire- 
cutting pliers, shear the belt at desired point, then bend 
the last loop on the trimmed end so it may be opened and 
hooked into loop at opposite end. Don't stretch an old 
spring belt unnecessarily or you'll have to trim it again, 
reducing its resiliency and its efficiency. 

OPTICAL SYSTEM: Optical system of your projector 
consists of the projection lens and a condenser lens. The 
latter is so concealed in some projectors that many owners 
do not know it exists. Projectors, like the Filmos, provide 
a removable slide for the condenser lens making it easy 
to remove and clean it at frequent intervals. Usually this 
lens accumulates a hazy film on both surfaces and this 
tends to reduce volume of light reaching the screen. Re- 
move this lens, where possible, soak it in warm water to 
which soap has been added and dissolve the coating on 
both surfaces. Dry thoroughly, polish and replace in pro- 
jector. Where condenser is fixed permanently in projector, 
it may be cleaned by rubbing with a soft cloth moistened 
in warm, soapy water. 

The projection lens may also accumulate a film of dirt 
on the surface of both elements. However, extreme care 
should be used in cleaning projection lens in order to 
avoid scratching lens' surface. Where possible, use lens 
tissue or Kleenex unless an extremely soft cloth, free 
from lint is available. 

It often happens that a film of dirt will accumulate on 
the inside surface of both lens elements, especially in the 
cheaper lenses where elements are retained by spring clips 
instead of threaded retaining rings. Unless the interior lens 
surfaces are badly coated, it is advisable not to dismantle 
the lens to clean them. Often the elements are set at a 
precise point or in a certain position for maximum effi- 
ciency. Failing to put the lens together properly after 
cleaning might render lens useless. 

OPERATION: After cleaning and oiling projector 
and polishing lens, next step is to check its operation. This 
is best done with machine set up ready for projection on 
the screen. The most important check, perhaps, is that 
of operating speed. It is surprising how many silent pro- 
jectors are regularly operated at speeds from 12 to 24 
frames per second. If yours is a silent projector it should 
operate normally at 16 f.p.s. for best picture results. A 
way to insure this is to make a test to determine at what 
point on rheostat projector runs at exactly 16. f.p.s. and 
to place a mark on the rheostat at that point as a guide for 
future operation of projector. 

A simple method for checking speed is to take a strip 
of film and punch a hole every eightieth frame, until four 
or five holes have been punched. This is based on fact 
8mm. and 16mm. film travels at rate of i6f.p.s. Eighty 
frames equals five seconds at this speed. Splice the piece 
of film together to form a loop, thread it in machine and 
project it on screen. Using an electric clock or watch 
with a second hand as a time piece, count the seconds 
between flashes of dots on the screen and regulate speed 
through rheostat until the dots appear at intervals of ex- 
actly five seconds. 

Flicker is the result of projector running too slow and 
while flicker is not always noticeable during projection 

• Continue J on Page 186 




• Stretched belts reduce efficiency of projector as do those coated with 
oil or grease. Clean them, then shorten if necessary, using pliers to cut and 
form a durable connecting loop. 




• Blowing dust off projector lens is a lazy m^n's way of doing it. Use a soft 
cloth and warm water to remove the hazy film that regularly accumulates on 
both lens elements. (Below) Of course your projector needs cleaning regu- 
larly, but not with soap and water. Use gasoline or carbon-tetrachloride and 
a soft brush to remove grease, dirt and oil residue. 




HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



• AM faults usually encountered by 
the beginning home processor are 
easily overcome, once understood, 
and creditable processing eventually 
results. 




ProceZHng, bugaboo^ 
and how to avoid them 

By CEORCE W. CUSHMAN 



w 

..IJI.OVIE amateurs who have at- 
tempted home reversal of movie film 
know that although the process in itself 
is relatively simple, initial results are 
not always what they should be. With 
a little practice, however, and a careful 
check of all factors involved, better 
and cleaner work is ultimately turned 
out and eventually a creditable film 
soon becomes the result of an evening's 
pleasure in the darkroom. 

It shouldn't be construed that the 
first attempt at home processing nets 
unsatisfactory results — that the pro- 
cessed film will be yellowish, flat in 
tone, or full of streaks, although these 
frequently mark the amateur's initial 
efforts. 

The shortcomings of home processed 
film are easily recognized when the 
film is projected on the screen, but the 
cause and how it may be avoided may 
not always be understood nor readily 
determined from text books. 

Some of the most common home pro- 
cessing troubles can be explained by 
this writer who believes he has encoun- 
tered most of them. Let's begin with 
those disappointing streaks. Streaking is 
invariably the result of a number of 
factors, the most important of which 
is the processor's habit of stopping .o- 



tation of the film drum during develop- 
ment of the film. Once the drum (or 
reel, whichever is used) is placed in the 
first solution, it should be completely 
and continuously agitated until the 
final rinse is finished. Stopping the film 
only for a moment's inspection at some 
stage of the process allows the develop- 
ing solutions to act longer on some 
parts of the film than others; allows 
"running" of the solutions on portions 
of the film not submerged; and permits 
uneven exposure of the room light. The 
answer to this problem is to keep the 
film moving throughout the entire re- 
versal process. 

Another cause for streaks is solutions 
which have not been thoroughly mixed. 
Stir all solutions thoroughly, very 
thoroughly, before pouring them into 
the developing trays, otherwise solution 
strength may vary in different parts of 
the tray, ■. roducing uneven densities 
and streaks. The light-flashing method 
has frequently been blamed as a cause 
of streaks, but this has yet to be defi- 
nitely established. However, without 
doubt better results will be obtained by 
turning the room light on as soon as 
the film has cleared in the bleach and 
leaving it on for the remainder of the 
process. 



Old solutions can also cause streaks. 
Cld solutions will sometimes have just 
enough "punch" left to work on the 
emulsion for a short time and then give 
out completely. If in this short period 
the action of the developer has not been 
even, streaks will result, and prolonged 
development will not correct the situa- 
tion since the old developer is too ex- 
hausted to smooth out these streaks. Use 
only fresh solutions and fresh chemicals. 
By all means use a fresh bleach solution 
each time. Another cause of streaks can 
be eliminated ■. / pre-soaking the film 
in plain water. Plunging the film direct- 
ly into the developer will cause it to 
work unevenly. 

Closely associated with streaks are 
stains and yellow smudges. Practically 
all yellow stains are caused by some ob- 
ject touching the wet emulsion before 
or during the bleaching process. 
Smudges usually turn out to be finger 
prints, nearly always caused by the over- 
anxious worker picking up the film to 
see if the image has yet appeared. Let 
that enthusiasm wait until the film is 
projected! It is a temptation, but it's 
tetter than a film full of yellow 
smudges. Once the film is wet, don't 
touch it, or allow anything to contact 
emulsion until near the end of the 
final rinse. That these stains are caused 
in this manner can be easily proved by 
merely touching end of the film firmly 
with the finger once just before the film 
goes into the bleach. When dry, a yel- 
low, unremovable stain will be found 
at this spot. When touched after the 
film has been cleared, uneven develop- 
ment will be found at this spot. If the 
film must be touched during develop- 
ment, handle it by the edges only. 

A most confusing result is obtaining 
a film that is too light or too dark. 
The beginner doesn't know whether to 
blame this developing procedure, or in- 
correct exposure. One way to get 
straight on this is to expose, prior to 
processing, a few frames of the film di- 
rectly to the sky with the camera lens 
removed or opened to its widest stop. 
This exposure will make it possible to 
judge quality^ of the reversal job. The 
frames thus exposed should be absolute- 
ly clear with no veiling or coloration of 
any kind when processing is completed. 
The edges of the film should be opaque 
— almost jet black. If this extreme con- 
• Continued on Page tj<^ 



176 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PACE 177 



S, 



'OONER or later, every one who 
owns a movie camera wants to make a 
really ambitious picture with a story 
plot, a cast of characters, etc. — a photo- 
play patterned after the Hollywood 
product. Many excellent amateur pho- 
toplays have been produced that have 
wen favorable comment on their artis- 
tic and cinematic values. Such pictures 
were successful not because the ama- 
teur producer was exceptionally gifted 
or because he had the most lavish and 
expensive cine equipment, but because 
they were based upon a sound story plot 
with plenty of action and human 
interest. 

If we are to produce a successful pho- 
toplay, one that will win wide audience 
acclaim and, perhaps, one of the sev- 
eral annual national awards, the first 
step is to find a good story. The next 
step is to transform that story into con- 
tinuity form — the scenario or shooting 
script which is the movie producer's 
blueprint. Knowing the elements of a 
good motion picture continuity and 
how to bring them out in photograph- 
ing the photoplay is one of the first es- 
sentials of successful story-film produc- 
tion. While the silent amateur photo- 
play must compete with the sound pic- 
tures we're all accustomed to today, 
the absence of sound is by no means a 
detriment. The silent picture, if it pos- 
sesses good story qualities enhanced by 
ample pantomimic values, is still excel- 
lent entertainment for any audience. 

When we undertake to build a house, 
there must be a carefully prepared set of 
plans if the structure is to be successful. 
If appearance of the completed house is 
to be attractive, those plans must fol- 
low certain accepted fundamentals in 
modern construction and design. 

Similarly, when we undertake pro- 
duction of an amateur photoplay, we 
first must have a carefully developed 
continuity containing all the best dra- 
matic elements of our story — drama, 
suspense and human interest. Indeed, a 
well developed continuity is the most 
important factor in creating a good 
picture. It is almost impossible to shoot 
a picture indiscriminately "off the cuff" 
and have all the scenes necessary at edit- 
ing time to make a smooth and interest- 
ing picture. The picture must first be 
visualized and worked out on paper. 

Without sound as an added means of 



• A carerully prepared continuity 
enables the director to stage each 
scene with assurance that none of the 
details important to plot develop- 
ment are overlooked at time of 
shooting. 



BLUE-PRINTING 
YOUR PHOTOPLAY 



telling the story, the amateur photoplay 
must be told in terms of the camera, 
that is, the thoughts that cannot be 
photographed or expressed in spoken 
dialogue must be indicated in action. 
Pantomimic values, therefore is the 
first requisite of the amateur photoplay. 

Next in importance is development 
of characterizations. Probably no other 
phaze of the amateur screenplay is so 
little understood as characterization. 
Too often a person is cast in a part for 
which he is unsuited by appearance and 
action or he is given none of the busi- 
ness to do that develops the character 
of the role he represents. Selection of 
actors, of course, is an individual prob- 
lem of the producer, but writing-in 
characterizing bits of business in the 
screen play is an important detail in de- 
veloping the continuity. 

If our character is to be portrayed 
a> cruel, we must give him something 
cruel to do rather than merely state his 



quality in a sub-title. Rather than in- 
sert a title: "Mary's husband was a 
grouch — " we show him in the various 
scenes acting like a grouch and we have 
him maintain this demeanor through- 
out the picture unless, of course, the 
plot calls for the husband to change. 
Each character in the picture should in- 
dicate his characterization by appropri- 
ate action and bits of business peculiar 
to the role rather than have it indicated 
in subtitles. 

With the importance of characteriza- 
tion established, let us proceed to the 
process of unfolding our story in con- 
tinuity form. The four progressive 
stages of a screen play are ( i ) the ex- 
position; (2) development; (3) de- 
nouement; and (4) the climax. If, 
when preparing our screenplay, we will 
keep these steps in mind, our play will 
arrive more readily and logically to a 
successful conclusion. 

• Continued on Page 187 




PAGE 178 



HOME MOVIES FOR jUNE 



CAMERA ANGLES -///w^ 

practice project for $une 




er's feet on the ground. The makers of 
such films have yet to learn the added 
nterest created by filming a scene 
from a new and unusual viewpoint. 
A study of new camera viewpoints, 
then, becomes a fitting subject for 
our Filmless Practice Project for 
June. Skeptics as well as the more 
studious devotee may take their 
empty cameras afield for a day and 
prove to themselves, simply by 
observing scenes through the cam- 
era viewfinder, what a lot of new 
interest can be created in a 
hI scene merely by shooting it 
from a second-story window, a 



0, 



'NE of the things that makes 
theatrical movies everlastingly fasci- 
nating for all of us today is the con- 
stant development of new techniques in 
cinematography. Today we have fades, 
dissolves, zoom shots, etc., that lend a 
powerful driving force in delineating a 
story or message on the screen. 

In the beginning, most motion pic- 
tures were filmed from virtually the 
same camera position, that is, the cam- 
era was invariably set upon a tripod 
fixed at one height, and all scenes were 
shot with the camera mounted approxi- 
mately 65 inches above the floor or 
ground — at about eye level of the cam- 
eraman. One of the earliest cinematic 
innovations occurred when an inventive 
cinematographer set up his camera be- 
lcw the customary tripod height to 
film an action shot from a low angle. 
Closeups, fades, dissolves, zooms, etc., 
stemmed from this initial digression 
from early-day cinematographic prac- 
tice. 

Angle shots continue to be an inter- 
est-stimulating artifice of cinematog- 
raphy — a cinematic device not alto- 
gether understood by some amateur 
movie makers. One need only to recall 
the many home movie films in which 
every scene was shot with the camera 
hand-held at eye level and with the film- 




beauty by filming it from a high eleva- 
tion that enabled the camera to catch 
the interesting pattern of tree shadows 
and the curve of the path and the 
stream. It is easy to visualize how all 
of this would be lost in a scene shot from 
a hand held or tripod-mounted camera 
at ground level. 

Most amateurs are aware of the im- 
petus closeups add to any motion pic- 
ture. But there are closeups and close- 
ups — some ordinary, some downright 
compelling in artistry. The second pic- 
ture — the low angle closeup of the man 
with binoculars — is a fine piece of com- 
position. Next time you are about to 
shoot a closeup of a person, try lower- 
ing the camera and shooting from the 
side, about three quarter profile position. 

Another good low angle composition 
i« that of the boys flying a kite. Inter- 
est is centered on the lads and extends 
to the object of their play — the kite. 
Imagine how much of this interest- 
compelling value would have been 
lost if picture had been shot with the 
camera at eye level. Or test a simi- 
lar composition yourself with your 
camera vhwfinder. 

Many readers have written the 
editors expressing delight for the 
inspiration these filmless practice 
projects have given them and for 
the improvement such practice 
has brought about in their per- 
sonal movie making. Some ad- 
mitted it sounded silly at first 
that anyone could take an 
• Continued on Page 192 



high branch of a tree, or by shooting 1 
from a low angle while lying flat on " 
one's stomach. 

Now, of course, it is possible to go 
overboard on odd angle shots, but an- 
gle shots, like any other cinematic de- 
vice, must be used with discretion like 
spice or salt or pepper. Let's look at 
the three pictures on this page — angle 
shots all of them. In the first picture a 
mther commonplace scene is given new 



• Pictured are three compelling angle shots — scenes 
tilmed at interesting camera viewpoints. Note detail of 
tree shadows and curve of stream and path in top photo. 
These would be missing in shot made from normal ground 
position. In center is a fine, low-angle closeup, and at 
right, another low angle shot that captures the spirit of 
kite flying time. 




HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



I 



LN recent issues, the writer has 
covered the mechanics of home movies 
titling — composition, lettering, back- 
grounds, photography, and development 
of the title film. Each of these are im- 
portant to successful title making. Yet 
the skill and care that is put into each 
step of the mechanical phase of title 
making goes for naught if the titles are 
spliced into the film in a careless, hap- 
hazard manner. 

The effectiveness of a title job well 
done lies not altogether in colorful back- 
grounds, ornamentation and trick ef- 
fects, but also in proper placement of 
the title in the film. We still see a great 
many amateur films in which descrip- 
tive titles are cut in too early or too 
late, or spoken titles inserted after a 
person is seen speaking the words. It is 
a wise and skillful movie maker who 
knows at exactly what frame to cut in 
a title — yet this skill is by no means 
reserved for a few. Any amateur can do 
it after a little careful study and ex- 
perimentation with his films. 

It is unfortunate that more movie 
amateurs do not have opportunity to 
see some of the old silent motion pic- 
tures as a means of studying good titl- 
ing technique. This technique, as ap- 
plied to amateur movies, is no different 
than it was in the old silent days for 
theatrical motion pictures. Timing a 
title properly would step up interest, ac- 
cent a dramatic effect, or motivate the 
plot just as it will for the amateur's 
movie of today. 

It frequently happens that even after 
a most thorough analysis of a film, a 
set of titles are made that, after being 
spliced into the picture, create a change 
ir. the film that wasn't counted on. 
Sometimes this is due to the tendency of 
titles to slow down the action caused 
by the title cutting into the action and 
momentarily withholding it from the 
audience. 



• Before cutting and splicing in a 
title, care should be exercised to de- 
termine the exact frame where title 
should begin for best possible effect. 




IRE YOUR TITLES 
PROPERLY PLACED? 



By GEORGE W 

For example, an untitled roll of film 
on the subject of deep sea fishing may 
appear a superb job of filming as it un- 
folds on the screen — action swift, tense, 
exciting. To the lay fisherman, the ac- 
tion as pictured needs no explanation. 
The filmer, however, decides to add ti- 
tles for the edification of his family and 
friends. And then what happens? 

What was originally a highly inter- 
esting picturization of deep sea fishing 
has become a slower, less interesting se- 
ries of fishing scenes. The titles, though 
necessary, have changed tempo of the 
film — have stolen the tense, exciting at- 
mosphere the film contained before it 
was edited. Close analysis shows that 



C U S H M A N 



the trouble lies in unwise placement of 
titles. Titles should not have been cut 
in in the midst of action. And this 
brings us to three important rules of 
title insertion. 

Don't use a title where it will in- 
terrupt interesting action. 

Don't allow a title to interfere with 
the suspense the action is creating. 

Don't permit attention of audience 
to lag by too many titles, or titles that 
are too long. Fast action requires the 
tersest of titles. 

Often a title which looked good on 
paper will have to be re-written and re- 
filmed. The message it is to convey must 

• Continued on Page 1 90 



• Most amateurs err in splic- 
ing in spoken titles. A spoken 
title should begin four frames 
after the person begins to 
speak and should end about 
four frames after person is 
shown finishing speech. In the 
instance pictured here, a di- 
rect cut was made from the 
title to the person spoken to, 
reducing footage and advanc- 
ing the action. 



179 



1 



* I have brought two-bits 
worth of candy ? 





• Two views of author's voltage control box for photof loods. Note simplicity of wiring, a task readily 
performed by any amateur handy with tools. 



LENGTHEN LIFE OF 
YOUR PHOTOFLOODS 



T, 



HE government's freezing of 
photoflood lamps makes it imperative 
that we treat those we already have 
with kid gloves — that we nurse them 
along to gain the maximum in min- 
utes of life from them. In order to do 
this, we can no longer burn photofloods 
carelessly at full brightness while fo- 
cusing, rearranging a scene or moving 
the camera to a new position. We've 
got to "save 'em" exclusively for shoot- 
ing pictures. 

One method for prolonging life of 
photofloods is to use a voltage control 
box that permits burning the lights at 
reduced voltage between takes, thus 




prolonging their life. As you know, the 
life of photofloods is quite short — 2 
hours for the number 1 and 4 hours for 
the number 2. But by stretching these 
hours out over a period of time in short 
intervals of burning, the lamps will last 
a surprisingly long time. Cutting the 
voltage or dousing lights entirely be- 
tween takes will make them to last even 
longer. 

A photoflood-saving switch box such 
pictured above is a simple apparatus 
that any amateur can build. It will ac- 
commodate a maximum of four No. 1 
photofloods. By throwing the main 
switch A (see diagram) to "Dim" the 



5 E.CTIOM 




wiring Diagram 



lamps will burn in series at reduced 
voltage. Throwing the switch to 
"Bright," the full current voltage is 
received by the photofloods wired in 
parallel. The supplemental switch C is 
used when only two photofloods are to 
be burned. This requires plugging the 
lamps into receptacles 2 and 4 and cut- 
ting off 1 and 3. 

Materials required for this control 
box are, as yet, still available in most 
localities from electrical supply houses 
and hardware stores. Required are: one 
110-V double-pole, double-throw tog- 
gle-type flush mounting switch (A) ; 
two 110-V duplex flush-type recep- 
tacles (B) ; and 110-V 10 Amp. panel- 
type toggle switch (C) such as used on 
many radios. The box, 8" by 6" by 
2 V%" 1 was made of plywood and the 
panel is a piece of bakelite salvaged from 
an old radio. Prestwood would also serve 
for this purpose. The panel, as may be 
observed from the photographs, is re- 
cessed into the box and this feature was 
accomplished by placing blocks 
shorter than depth of box inside at each 
corner and at the sides. Panel is secured 
to these blocks with short wood screws, 
making it flush with edges of box. 

As templates for marking panel for 
the holes to be cut for switches, re- 
ceptacles, and screws, I used regular 
switch and receptacle wall plates. 
Outline of the screw holes and openings 
were scribed upon the panel with a sharp 
instrument. Afterward, screw holes 
were drilled, and the receptacle and 
switch openings cut with a small scroll 
saw and finished with a file. 

Receptacles A and B were mounted 
• Continued on Page 191 



• Construction and wiring diagrams of au- 
thor's voltage control for photofloods. Unit is 
easily constructed from materials and parts 
still available. Its use is imperative to pro- 
longed life of photofloods now frozen for the 
duration. 



180 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



Qadg,eteerd apparatus 

Umpire* ANIMATION 



By ARTHUR 



M 



SHARP 



0, 



'NE of the most amusing movie 
making incidents was related to me re- 
cently by an amateur describing his first 
efforts at shooting animated movies by 
single frame exposures. It seems he was 
obsessed with the ambition to film an 
animated title in which a small doll 
would walk into the title area drawing 
a toy wagon filled with lettered blocks 
that, when assembled magically, would 
spell his daughter's name. 

He generously alloted himself one 
evening for the project — a few hours 
after the dinner table was cleared in 
which to set up his camera, arrange 
lights, background and assorted props 
and shoot the picture. By eight o'clock 
he was ready to shoot the first frame. 
The first exposure completed, he turned 
off his photofloods to save light, moved 
the doll a fraction of an inch for the 
next exposure, turned on the photo- 
floods, made another single exposure and 
so on, ad infinitum. By nine o'clock 
he was getting in the groove; by ten his 
enthusiasm was at fever pitch and, final- 
ly, by two o'clock next morning the 
task was completed. 

When the film came back from the 
processors, he anxiously projected it, 
only to find it flashed on the screen 
and off again almost before he could 
read it — the film he had spent eight 
hours in filming! He lamented that if 
only it was just twice as long it would 
compensate for his tired feet and aching 
back suffered in that eight hour ordeal. 

And all this reminded me that several 
years ago I had had a similar experi- 

Electxlc Clock 



ence. At that time, Home Movies had 
published a series of drawings which 
amateur movie makers could film in 
stop motion to produce an animated ti- 
tle. After spending one whole evening 
on the project, I gave up in disgust. 
Next morning, however, I was determ- 
ined to try again — this time with a suit- 
able animating bench that would make 
my work easier. The three photos on 
this page show the apparatus I built 
for filming the titles in stop motion and 
which is applicable to filming animation 
of any kind where subject must be 
mounted and filmed on a parallel stage 
or title board. 

The important objectives I sought in 
making this apparatus was a positive 
single frame exposure control, a depend- 
able frame counting device, and means 
for using light source only during ex- 
posure. Readers will recognize the elec- 
trical timing device which I have also 
used in time-lapse photography and 
which was described at length on page 
388 in the October 1942 issue of Home 
Movies. This same device was put to 
work in operating my camera for sin- 
gle frame animation after an electrical 
counting device was added as shown in 
the accompanying diagram. 

Movie amateurs who have attempted 
single frame photography with dubious 
results will appreciate the apparatus de- 
scribed here. A single electrical contact 
turns on the photofloods momentarily, 
opens and closes the shutter, moves the 
frame counter forward one point, and 



Telegraph 



Rubber' To Camera 

Bend Starting Button 



110-T. Tftr 110-v. 



I Trans 
I formerl 




Solenoid 



Solenoid Operating 
Single Frame Release 




• Photos show three important details of 
author's animating bench: I — telegraph key 
(in foreground) for closing circuit that oper- 
ates lights, frame counter and camera shut- 
ter release simultaneously; 2 — electrically op- 
erated frame counter; 3 — stage for holding 
title drawings in place. 



extinguishes the photofloods after ex- 
posure is completed. 

The electrical contact is an ordinary 
telegraph key, shown in Fig. i and 
again in the diagram, Fig. 4. It may be 
placed upon the floor and foot operated, 
leaving hands free to move the title let- 
ters or subject of animation. When 
pressed for contact, the key closes an 
electrical circuit that sets the solenoids 
(see Fig. 4) in motion. These light the 
photofloods, operate the frame counter, 
and the large solenoid is set in motion, 
producing a single exposure. 

• Continued on Page 1S6 



• Fig. A — Wiring diagram of automatic con- 
trols that turn on photofloods, and operate 
frame counter and single frame exposure 
release. Apparatus is essentially the same as 
described for time-lapse photography in 
October, 1942 Home, Movies except that 
frame counter and telegraph key switch have 
been added. 



Photofloods 
Connected Here 



181 



PACE 182 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 




THE EXPERIMENTAL 



Editing Aid 

To speed up the winding of short 
strips of film, a flange-spindle is a de- 
cided advantage over a reel or winding 
by hand. Individual scene strips can be 
quickly coiled and placed on pegs or in 
compartment ready for editing and 
splicing. 

Such a flange-spindle can be made 
by cutting one flange away from a cam- 
era spool. This may be done with a file, 
cutting as close to the spool hub as pos- 
sible, then smoothing down the rough 
edges so coiled film may slide easily 
from the core. Finishing with emery pa- 
per will insure no rough edges remain 
to scratch film. 

To use, place flange-spindle on re- 
wind. Do not insert end of film in slot 
of core but hold it on core and wind 
film one or two turns until the film 
binds itself. Then wind full length of 
the film, secure it with scotch tape. To 
remove roll of film from core, hold film 
with one hand and slowly turn rewind 
backward, at same time, sliding film 
forward off core. — Roger M. Jo/mston, 
Glendale, Calif. 

Finding Start Mark 

In winding back film in camera for 
dissolves and other trick effects, it is 
important that some dependable means 
be employed for marking and subse- 



WANTED! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they dupicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 
use. 



quently locating the exact "starting 
point" in the film. 

A dependable method to follow is to 
remove the camera lens, after film has 
been threaded in camera, and allow film 
to run at slow speed until the serial 
perforations appear. As all film pre- 
ceding these perforations is removed at 
time of processing, no regular footage 
is lost in this operation. 

As soon as perforations appear, stop 
camera and release one frame at a time 
until the first frame following end of 
perforations appears. Make a pencil 
mark on the film, then set frame and 
footage counters on camera to "Zero." 
Should it be necessary to remove film 
from camera at any time before it is 
fully exposed, note footage and frame 
number before removing. It may then 
be re-inserted in camera at a future 
date and the film run to the exact start- 
ing point by following the routine 
above described. — Jas. N. Whitaker, 
West EnglewooJ, N. J. 



Film Scraper 



Like many other cine-bugs I have a 
pet film scraper. Alongside of my Spli- 
cer I fixed a narrow square strip of 
wood, the width of the film and about 
two or three inches long. Combined 
with an ordinary ten cent three-cor- 
nered file, this completes my scraper. 
I merely lay the film on the block and 
with one or two well placed strokes, 
off comes the emulsion. 

With a little practice the correct 
amount can be removed each time. 
With this method there is no messy 
business of wetting the film and scrap- 
ing it off, also no chance of tearing the 
film perforations. — Jas. Rich, Chicago. 



Color Titling 



I have had considerable difficulty in 
determining just what is the best title 
to use with Kodachrome. Having found 
what I consider the ideal title, I will 
pass it along to others. 

The title has a light tan background 
with dark brown letters. To obtain this 
I merely photographed an ordinary 
printed title (white background and 
black letters) on positive film. 

I developed this in D-72 and then 
proceed to reverse the film in the con- 
ventional manner. Instead of using a 
second developer, I wash the film in a 
5 ' 1 solution of sodium sulphide. This 
turns the remaining emulsion into a 
sepia tone. Follow this with a short wash 
and a fixing bath. — /. D. Barton, 
Denver. 



Title Letters 

I made my own block title letters 
cut of balsa wood. Using a sharp razor 
blade, I cut a number of strips of 
balsa in thickness. From this ma- 
terial I cut the necessary pieces to form 
block letters of the alphabet, in 
height, using glue to cement the pieces 
together. 

Sanding down surface of each letter 
after the glue had dried, the letters were 
then ready for use. I found that using 
them unpainted provided a unique ef- 
fect in that the natural grain of the 
wood was more attractive than color. 
They can readily be painted however 
with either oil or water colors. — Roland 
Clark, Baker, Oregon. 

Makes Enlargements 

Sketches show a gadget that will en- 
able movie amateurs to enlarge single 
frames of cine film to any desired size. 
Its greatest advantage is that it em- 
ploys, for enlarging purposes, the high- 
ly corrected and large aperture enlarger 
lens. Necessary, of course, is a regular 
photo enlarger. 

Gadget consists of a square piece of 
ply- wood A cut to fit lensboard holder 
of the enlarger. A hole is cut in center 
slightly larger than area of single frame 
of film. Fitted over hole is film track 
and gate D. I used the film gate from 
an old toy projector. However, a suit- 
able gate may be fashioned from a 
piece of light metal. Two narrow pieces 
of wood B were glued at either side of 
plywood square, as shown, and another 
plywood piece C was cemented then 
screwed to form a two-ply lens board. A 



A - etao p,£cr to 

tIMS 80A*a H 

on ENipaeta 

S-BLOCtfS TO HOtb IfV/ 

ppopfp D'irpMcr 

FPONt FILM Q 
C-LFNS POLOIK 

D-gatf FOR Film 
£ • FMLPPOtA LFHt 




hole was drilled in board C and the en- 
larger lens E screwed into it, thus com- 
pleting the unit. 

In use, it is placed in the lens board 
holder of the enlarger, in the place of 
the ordinary lens board. The desired 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 

cue wo 



frame is centered in the gate, and the 
light in the enlarger turned on. The en- 
largement may then be focussed by 
means of the focusing ring on the cam- 
era lens. When the proper focus is ob- 
tained with the lens wide open, it is 
stopped down to about f/5.6. 

In enlarging from reversal, the en- 
largement must be made, not on en- 
larging paper, but on film. The most 
suitable film for this purpose is a cut 
film, of about lantern slide speed 
(Weston, 2 to 4). The enlargement re- 
sults in a negative, from which any 
desired number of prints may be made. 
— Vincent P. Biunno, Newark, N. J. 




Aids Editing 

Here is a simple method, within easy 
reach of every amateur, by which film 
strips may be arranged in orderly man- 
ner and made ready for splicing. 
Stretching a wire on two supports over 
my editing board, the film strips are 
hung on improvised hooks bearing num- 
bered tabs indicating their relation to 
the script or continuity. 

These hooks were made from ordi- 
nary wire paper clips as shown in Fig. 

1. The clips were bent as shown in Fig. 

2. Small square tabs were cut from 
cardboard as shown in Fig. 3 and a 
small hole punched in each to facilitate 
hanging them on the paper clips. The 
tabs were numbered to correspond to 
scene or cut numbers. Fig. 4 shows the 
clip in use. The number five film strip 
is hooked on the No. 5 clip and placed 
cn the wire to await splicing. — Lewis 
1. Rossi ter, Phoenixville, Penna. 

Film Scraper 

Unusually efficient and durable dry 
scrapers for splicing can be made from 
discarded pieces of hacksaw blades. 
Scraping edges can be ground on both 
ends of a 3 or 4 inch piece. The saw 
teeth may be ground off and the scraper 
polished with emory cloth to produce a 
neat tool for removing film emulsion. 
— /. G. Hottinger. 



II K S II II P 



Screen Substitute 

When you're stuck for a larger 
screen, mount a bed sheet on a curtain 
stretcher and set up the stretcher with 
the frame facing projector. Sheet can 
be drawn taut and made wrinkle-proof 
by fastening it to the numerous metal 
pin points on the stretcher frame. — 
Wm. J. Gatti, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Zoom Focus Control 

In order to make successful dolly 
shots with my 16mm. Bell & Howell, I 
found it necessary to adjust focus of 
lens as camera approached or retreated 
from object being photographed so that 
subject would remain in sharp focus 
throughout the full forward or reced- 
ing movement of the camera. To ac- 
complish this, I worked out a variable 
focus control as shown in accompany- 
ing sketch. It consists of a semi-circu- 
lar scale plate which fits over the Filmo 
focusing tube and an indicator or point- 
er which is attached to the focusing 
ring of the lens. 

This pointer is affixed to the lens 
ring so that it points to the correspond- 
ing footage figure on the scale plate 



FITS OVEf? FOCUSING TUBE 
OF &&H CAMERA 




as seen from back of the camera. The 
scale plate is marked in feet according 
to markings on lens. Thus to keep cam- 
era in focus in a zooming dolly move- 
ment of camera, cameraman or assist- 
ant moves the pointer in keeping with 
distance of camera to object. Gadget 
is readily removable when its use is not 
required. It may be constructed to fit 
other types of cine cameras by re-de- 
signing scale plate so it will fit the par- 
ticular camera case or convenient part. 
— Demetris Emanuel, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Poorly Exposed Films 

Improperly exposed films may be cor- 
rected to an extent by the chemical 
processes of "reduction" or "intensifica- 
tion," as the case may be. Not all ama- 



PAGE 183 



gadgets, trick* & 
shortcut* contri- 
buted by, Cinebug,* 



teurs are, however, interested in or 
equipped to carry out the darkroom side 
of photography. All amateurs falling in 
this category may greatly enhance the 
presentability of their poorly exposed 
films by simply tinting them with Fd- 
wal Phototints. 

The results are most favorable when 
the darker tints, such as blue and deep 
red, are used on over-exposed film. Un- 
der-exposed shots may, however, be liv- 
ened up considerably when tinted a yel- 
low or light orange. — Karl Prick. 

Fader for Titler 

I make fades in my titles by simply 
dimming the illumination. The dim- 
ming or fading device is built into my 
titler as shown in accompanying dia- 
gram. It consists of a small plywood 
box in which is mounted a 1 50 ohm va- 
riable resistance or rheostat. A toggle 
switch controls power line input. The 
single photoflood in a reflector (not 
shown) is mounted directly on the ply- 
wood box so that it clears the camera 
and centers illumination on title card. 
Mounting consists of piece of round 
metal rod bent L-shape. One end is 
mounted on box and the lamp socket is 
soldered at opposite end as shown. 

Wiring hookup is simple. One side of 
line goes directly to lamp socket; the 




other is connected in series with toggle 
switch and rheostat. 

To make a fadeout, title is filmed for 
desired footage, then rheostat is turned 
down gradually to dim the photoflood 
and extinguish it entirely. A fade-in 
is made in the opposite manner. — Wm. 
Cosulas, Los Angeles, Calif. 



PACE 184 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 




WHERE TO RENT OR 


BUY 


8MM. and 16MM. FILMS 


To augment your home 


movie 


shows, make use of the fine libraries 


of rental films, both sound and 


silent, 


maintained by your photo dealer for 


owners of 8mm. and 16mm. projectors. 


Rental rates are surprisingly low and 


new films are added at regular intervals. 


Dealers listed below will gladly assist 


with suggestions for one reel to 


full evening programs: 


CALIFORNIA 




NEW YORK 


HOLLYWOOD 




N t N MVJK t 


Bailey Film Service 




Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 


1651 Cosmo Street 








281 1 Delaware Ave. 


RaII fL M^,u/. II Pilmntmir^ 1 ihrHru 
dci I 01 nowcii rniiiuiuunu liui ai f 






716 N. La Brea Ave. 




rJtW TUKU 


Castle's Inc. 




Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 


1529 Vine Street 




30 Rockefeller Plaza 


LOS ANGELES 




Films Incorporated 


Films Incorporated 




330 W. 42nd St. 


1709 W. 8th Street 






Robert Crawford Pictures 




Walter O. Gutlohn. Inc. 




25 West 45th St. 


1702 So. Kingsley Dr. 










Ha ber & Fin k Inc. 


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 




12-14 Warren St. 


WASHINGTON 




Medo Photo Supply 






15 West 47th St. 


Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 






n c v n w 




National Cinema Service 






69 Dey Street 


ILLINOIS 




Nu-Art Films Inc. 






145 West 45th Street 


BERWYN 






Colonial Camera Shop 






6906 Windsor Ave. 




OHIO 




CHICAGO 






B • ..11 f" 1 .n . ■ J 1 ?t-_ — — . 

Bell & n owe II rilmosound Library 




r~ 1 KJ C 1 KJ W A T 1 


1825 Larchmont Ave. 




Haile & Assoc. (B & H Branch) 






Films Incorporated 




215 Walnut St. (Within 100 Miles) 


64 E. Lake Street 










DAYTON 


General Camera Company 






2308 West Devon Avenue 




Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 






2227 Hepburn Ave. 


KANSAS 






WICHITA 




OREGON 


Jeff's Camera Shop 






139 N. Broadway 




PORTLAND 


Lewis Film Exchange 




Films Incorporated 


216 East 1st St. 




314 S. W. 9th Avenue 


MASSACHUSETTS 










TEXAS 


BOSTON 






Don Elder's Film Library 




DALLAS 


739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 




National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 


Frank Lane and Company 




2024 Main St. 


5 Little Building 






MICHIGAN 




WEST VIRGINIA 




DETROIT 




CHARLESTON 


Detroit Camera Shop 




Elmer B. Simpson 


325 State Street 




816 W. Virginia St. 



JJ/ y,ou want a 
FILM to *kow 

. . . NEWS OF TIMELY SUBJECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Yanks Bomb Tckyo — The people of 
America waited a year to learn that 
General Doolittle's "Shangri la" base 
for the raid on Japan was actually the 
aircraft carrier Hornet, releasing its 
great Army bombers 6oo miles from 
Tokyo. Now, thrilling movies can be 
seen on the home screen of the daring 
takeoff from the narrow deck of the 
plunging, storm-tossed carrier. The ac- 
tion in "Yanks Bomb Tokyo" starts 
with the blasting of an unlucky Jap 
patrol boat from the raging sea. This 
chance encounter causes the flight 
schedule to be moved up, so that Doo- 
little and hii men attack Japan by day- 
light instead of night as planned. 

Captured Japanese film shows the 
kind of air-raid precautions that failed 
when the Yanks swooped over Tokyo 
at house-top level. The dramatic end 
of the history-making achievement is 
seen in China as Madame Chiang Kai- 
Chek decorates General Doolittle and 
other survivors of the daring raid. 

Released by Castle Films, "Yanks 
Bomb Tokyo" is available in both 8mm. 
and 1 6mm. in an assortment of lengths 
— one in sound. Where film is not avail- 
able through dealer, interested pro- 
jector owners are invited to write Castle 
Films, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y. City. 

Adventures at the Baskervilles" is ti- 
tle of 8 reel 16mm. sound film produc- 
tion currently released by Common- 
wealth Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh 
Ave., New York City. 

Featuring Arthur Wontner, Ian 
Fleming and L'yn Harding, picture is 
based on Conan Doyle's novel "Silver 
Blaze." In it Sherlock Holmes and Dr. 
W atson again come into conflict with 
their old enemy Professor Moriarty. 
This time a great race horse disappears 
and three murders occur before the de- 
| tective solves the case. 



HOME MOVIES FOR )UNE 



PACE 18$ 



Bismarck Sea Victory is the second 
Castle Films release for June. It shows 
the utter destruction of a Jap fleet of 
22 ships by land-based American and 
Australian bombers. The entire Jap con- 
voy is seen steaming along in orderly 
array before it scatters in an attempt to 
avoid MacArthur's wave-skimming at- 
tackers, employing the devastating new 
'skip-bombing" technique. 

Ship after ship in the Jap flotilla is 
bombed to destruction. The film shows 
enemy ships going up in flames. Bat- 
tered, burning hulks litter the sea. 
There is an .'.mazing sequence of aerial 
photography as vwo defending Zeros, 
caught in a hail of bullets, explode and 
disintegrate in mid-air! 

"Bismarck Sea Victory" is the living 
film record of the total destruction of 
22 Jap ships, including 10 warships, 
102 Jap aircraft, and 15,000 Japs. It is 
a clear-cut victory of airpower over 
Jap sea power. 

Castle Films' "Bismarck Sea Vic- 
tory" is available at photo stores in five 
8mm. and 16mm. sizes and lengths for 
less than the cost ov unexposed movie 
film. 




Caucasian Barrier is a new single-reel 
1 6mm. sound film photographed and 
narrated by Carveth Wells, and edited 
by Wm. F. Kruse for Bell & Howell 
Filmsound Library. Beginning from So- 
viet Armenia, south of the great Cauca- 
sian barrier that separates the continents 
of Europe and Asia, the cameraman 
journeytd northward along the Geor- 
gian military highway into the most 
inaccessible land of the Khevsurs, rem- 
nant of isolated Crusader bands. It is 
considered an impressive educational 






' The EDWAL LABORATORIES, INC. 

' Dept. 6HM, 732 Federal St., Chicago, III. 

J In Canada: W. E. Booth Co., Toronto 








0 Here is my quarter for a trial bottle of Foto Tints. 
$ hundreds of feet of film. Please send color checked. 


enough 


to color g 


' □ Fire Red □ Sapphire Blue 


□ 


Amber 


Brown 0 


g Q Royal Purple □ Emerald Green 


□ 


Sunlit 


Yellow J 


' NAME 








' (Please Print) t 
* ADDRESS * 


* CITY STATE t 





en EDWAL 

(MANSFIELD) 

FotoTintS 

The New Easy Way To Tint- Black- 
and-White Movies and Make Color 
Titles For Your Color Film. 

No dark room! No bleaches! 
Simply immerse film in Foto 
Tint solution. Trial bottle 
colors hundreds of feet of 
film. Six permanent colors. 
Offer 
Expires 
July 1, 7943 



MAIL COUPON NOW 




Put Color in Your Black and 
White Movies with ----- 



Cine-Tint ors 



Set of 4 Monochrome 
Projection Filters 

Black - and - White Cine-films will 
screen in greater glory, if tinted by 
the simple expedient of slipping one 
of the coloring filters over the front 
of the projection lens. 
For instance, blue for snow-scenes and 
sea, red glow for sunsets, green for 
masses of forest and lawns, mellow yel- 
low for late afternoon and even to "warm up" Kodachromes. 
The four tints of the set will lend n;w enchantment to old reels which can 
be brought to the screen again "looking different." 

The six adjustable prongs of the mount will make a perfect fit, secure and 
yet easily detached. 

FOUR POPULAR SIZES (Order by Size) 
22MM. 32MM. 

: Keyston2 8mm. *E. K. Mod. 80 Keystone A-75 16mm. 

*E. K. 16-10 *B. & H. 8mm. 




27MM. 

E. K. Mod. 70 

''Adjust prongs 

Established 1898 



* Revere 

$2.95 




38MM. 

B. & H. 16mm. 
Keystone A- 82 *Ampro 



Mail Orders Filled 



110 West 32nd Street, N. Y. 

World's Largest Camera Store Built on Square Dealing 



PAGE 186 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



This May Be Your 
LAST OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE 
THIS HARD-TO-GET EQUIPMENT 

8MM CAMERAS (New) 

Kodak Model 20, F3.5 $30.50 

Kodak Model 25, F2.5 43.75 

Kodak Model 60, FI.9 with case 82.65 



Keystone K8, 
Keystone K8, 
Keystone K8, 
Revere F3.5 



F3.5 
F2.5 
FI.9. 



28.58 
37.35 
58.46 
34.95 



Revere F2.5 49.95 



Revere Turret F2.5 
Bell & Howell Companion F3.5 



73.50 
52.80 

Bell & Howell Sportster F2.5 74.15 

16MM. CAMERAS (New) 

Cine Kodak, Model E, F3.5 $ 42.00 

Cine Kodak, Model K, FI.9, case 95.00 
Cine Kodak, Magazine FI.9, case 135.00 

Keystone Bl 31.45 

Keystone A3, F3.5 38*25 

Keystone A7, F2.7 47.25 
Keystone A7, FI.5 70.45 
Victor 3, F2.9 Dallmeyer A7 50 

Bolex with I" FI.5 WolUn^ 253 00 
Bell & Howell Autoload, F2-7 131 20 



A 



WE. 
BUY) 



TOP CASH PRICE PAID 
for desirable 
CAMERAS, MOVIE 
EQUIPMENT, Be. 



Abe Cohens Exchange, 



THl HOUSl Of mOTOQKAWIC VAIUIS 



142 FULTON STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 



a barrel of laughs! 
"Cartoons — comedies 

Complete Edition 

8 MM $ 5.50 

16 MM 8.75 

16 MM. SOUND 17.50 

Dealer Discounts Available 
CERTIFIED FILM DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 

25 West 45th Street New York 



8 ENLARGED f\ REDUCED ^\ 

TO lb TO O 

BLACK AND WHITE AND KODACH ROME 

CEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A MERCHANDISE MART 
CHICAGO 



STOP "APOLOGIZING" 
for your movie titles 

• To prove how easy it is to make beautiful pro- 
fessional-looking titles. . . A-to-Z offers you a 
• SAMPLE TITLE KIT— FREE • 
Send for your kit today — it's free 

A-ro-Z MOVIE ACCESSORIES 



175 Fifth Ave. 



Dept. H5I 



New York. N. Y. 



Wl 



BUY 



l%m. amateur K-darhrome nr BW footage suitable for 
use in making home movie subjects. Write, describing 
fully. 

>lso interested in purchasing rights to lfimm. film sub- 
jects from concerns who have Bitch material but are not 
now actively listing them. 

• Box 619 HOME MOVIE MAGAZINE _ 
6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, California 



picture of an area now prominently 
in the news headlines. Subject is avail- 
able for outright sale at $36.00 or may 
be rented at $1.50 per day. Write Bell 
& Howell Co., 1801 Larchmont Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

There Goes My Heart, a popular 
Hal Roach production starring Fred- 



ric March and Virginia Bruce is now 
available in 16mm. sound from Post 
Pictures Corp., 723 Seventh Ave., New 
York City, N. Y. This multi-reel fea- 
ture is especially appropriate for any 
non-theatrical showing or to augment 
programs of Civilian Defense, or War 
Bond sales rallies. Prices and other data 
may be had by writing the distributor. 



J^enythen projector' A life . 



• Continued from Page 175 

of pictures, it is definitely harmful to 
eyes of audience. It may easily be de- 
tected by running projector without 
film and watching the screen. 

If pictures are not steady, appear to 
jump on the screen, it may be due to im- 
properly adjusted pressure plates in the 
film gate or to worn teeth in the inter- 
mittent movement. In either case, your 
dealer or factory representative should 
be consulted. 

The film gate is by no means the last 
important part of the projector and it 
should receive cleaning each time pro- 
jector is used. A good camel hair brush 
should always be available for cleaning 
particles of lint and dust away from 
the film aperture. At intervals, the film 
gate should be removed, where possible, 
and cleaned of any accumulation of 
emulsion particles that may deposit 
there. For this task use nothing but a 
soft wood stick or a cloth saturated in 
carbon-tethrachloride or nail polish re- 
mover. Polish the gate with a soft cloth 
after cleaning. 

EXTERIOR: Not the least import- 
ant is keeping exterior of projector 



cleaned and polished at all times. If 
exterior is free of dust, there is little 
likelihood that dust will accumulate in 
the moving parts, film gate, or belts 
to impair its efficiency. 

Gasoline or carbon-tetrachloride ap- 
plied with a small brush will remove 
dust and grease and renew the finish of 
most projectors. The bright metal trim 
may also be cleaned and polished with 
these same solvents, then rubbed to a 
bright luster with a clean, dry cloth. 

If worn or broken parts are discov- 
ered or there are necessary adjustments 
beyond your ability to make, most cam- 
era stores and photographic dealers are 
in a position to render repair service or 
to send your machine to the factory for 
overhauling. Manufacturers such as Bell 
& Howell, Eastman Kodak Company 
and others have lately enlarged their 
camera and projector repair divisions 
especially for servicing their custo- 
mer's equipment to insure its contiuued 
operation for the duration. If your's is 
in need of repair, it is advisable to con- 
sult the manufacturer now while re- 
placement parts are still available. 



Qadgeteer'* animation 



• Continued from Page lii 

All the operator has to do is sit at 
his worktable and operate the key with 
his foot and move the figures or letters 
to be animated. There's none of the 
getting up and down, running around 
the table, etc., to turn lights off and 
on, or to re-set the camera for the sub- 
sequent exposure. No aching back and 
feet the next morning. 

Readers interested in making a simi- 
lar apparatus will do well to review 
the earlier article already referred to 
which appears in the October issue. 
Construction and wiring of the timing 
device is fully described therein. How- 
ever, some alterations have since been 
made, as already stated, and these will 
now be described. 

The wiring diagram (Fig. 4) shows 



the complete electrical hookup neces- 
sary to make all the automatic controls 
work perfectly. Notice that a shunt is 
put across the clock's low voltage wir- 
ing. This eliminates the clock wiring 
which is used only during time-lapse 
work. Also the electric counter and 
telegraph key are connected in the cir- 
cuit as shown in the diagram. I have en- 
circled with dotted lines the changes 
which were made in the circuit to con- 
vert from time-lapse to animation pho- 
tography. 

If desired, the counter may be left 
on all the time, also the telegraph key 
could be adjusted to make a continu- 
ous circuit when doing time-lapse work. 
However the electric clock shunt must 
be removed or disconnected each time. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PACE 187 



A toy train transformer is used to fur- 
nish low voltage to operate the sol- 
enoids. 

Those who already have inst ailed a 
frame counter on their cameras, as de- 
scribed in the April issue, will find the 
electric counter unnecessary. The coun- 
ter pictured here is operated by one of 
the solenoids and is made by Production 
Instrument Co., Chicago, 111. 

The light brackets are made from the 
"gooseneck" of a desk lamp. The cam- 
era stand is made from plywood with 
a suitable slot underneath to line up the 
drawings and allow them to slide easily 
from side to side. The only thing not 
pictured is the auxiliary lens. This is 
held in place over the regular lens by 
a filter holder. 

As may be seen in the photos, the 
series of title drawings were animated 
by mounting them on strips of card- 
board and photographing them, one at 



a time. The opening in the title card 
holder is so marked that each drawing 
can be lined up or centered accurately 
thus assuring smooth animation free 
from "jumps" that often character- 
izes amateur animation of this kind. 

Of course, this outfit can be utilized 
for other types of animation and for 
straight titling. But it was the Home 
Movies series of drawings for animated 
titles that furnished incentive for 
building the apparatus. And because of 
it, I have discovered the pleasures of a 
hitherto untried field of movie making, 
a field that enables me to continue ac- 
tive with my hobby in spite of the war- 
time restrictions that now hinder out- 
door movie making. Animated movies 
dc not require the amount of film, nor 
the use of gasoline and tires that my 
outdoor movie making did and, frankly, 
I'm beginning to like my indoor filming 
projects better. 



Slue- printing, photoplay, . . . 

• Continued from Page 177 



The exposition includes introduction 
of characters and establishing premise 
of our story. Here the audience is given 
the means of recognizing the main char- 
acters in the play. Certain clues are 
laid before them and certain facts with- 
held to gi^'e the audience a command of 
the situation in the opening sequences. 
The time and place of the action is also 
established either in the story telling or 
by means of titles. 

In the development stage, the story 
progresses with the building of sus- 
pense. The reasons for the conflict that 
is taking place in the story is revealed 
as the plot progresses. Each incident, 
large or small, must contribute to the 
story as a whole, otherwise it should be 
excluded. 

The denouement is that part of the 
story which rises to the peak of suspense 
just preceding the climax and without 
revealing, entirely, outcome of the 
story. Thus, in "Mister X," a recent 
Movie of the Month, the man being fol- 
lowed is successfully masquerading in 
woman's clothes — the development. Sud- 
denly, his identity is revealed and the 
detective confronts him — but it is not 
yet revealed why the detective wants 
him. "Is he wanted for murder, draft 
evasion, or what?" the audience asks at 
peak of the denouement. Then a climac- 
tic twist reveals the detective to be only 
a process server — serves Mr. X with a 
summons in a divorce action. 

The climax clears up the suspense 
that has been created by all the action 
that has gone before. It is the result of 
the struggle between the hero or heroine 
and the villain or against conflicting 
elements of the story. It is the point at 



which we reveal the main character 
overcoming all obstacles, leaving the 
audience satisfied that everything 
turned out for the best. 

In preparing an amateur screenplay, 
analyze the high dramatic points in the 
story, list them on a sheet of paper. 
The various stages of the story can be 
developed easily, more logical from this 
list. With the story analyzed and the 
plot outline roughly sketched on pa- 
per, the next step is to write it in con- 
tinuity form in which each scene and 
title is described as completely as is 
necessary for the cast or director to 
follow. Most amateurs, of course, are 
familiar with the accepted continuity 
or scenario form in which each scene is 
described as to location, camera posi- 
tion, and the action that is to take 
place. All scenes should be numbered 
consecutively, beginning with 1 and all 
titles should be indicated in their prop- 
er position with relation to the scene 
they describe or quote. 

Given an intelligent story thus pre- 
pared in continuity form, the amateur 
film producer is more capable of turn- 
ing out a successful photoplay. He does 
not have to carry the story in his mind. 
Every little action and mannerism, 
every attention-getting bit of business 
that was thought out during the patient 
writing of the continuity is described 
briefly but fully. He need but follow 
the description to insure the maximum 
in suspense and action. Without the 
continuity, much of the important 
business that evolved from careful 
planning of the play, might become 
lost in the hustle and bustle of produc- 
tion. 



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HOME MOVIC.3 FOR JUNE 



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TITLE TROUBLES 



By CEORGE W. CUSHMAN 



I, 



[F you have any questions per- 
taining to titles or title-making, Mr. 
Cushman will be glad to answer them. 
Address him in care of Home Movies or 
his residence, 1333 Locust St., Long 
Beach, Calif. In explaining your title 
troubles, include information such as 
type of equipment used, film, light 
source, and when problem occurs in 
finished title film, send along a sample 
of the film. Enclose a self-addressed 
stamped envelope if you wish a direct 
reply. 

Q: / find it almost impossible to buy 
positive film for making titles. What 
other emulsions are suited to title mak- 
ing by the direct-positive method? — H. 
S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A: Any black and white negative, 
positive or reversal film can be used for 
making titles by the direct-positive 
method. The faster pan films will not 
produce the brilliance nor contrast af- 
forded by positive film in title making 
but they will make satisfactory titles. 
If you use pan film, under-expose a lit- 
tle and develop fully in contrast devel- 
oper. Some negative pan films have a 
grey base which makes it impossible to 
get clear white letters, but they are 
nevertheless satisfactory as a substitute 
for positive. 

When home-developing reversal films 
to a positive only, the anti- or non-hala- 
tion backing to be found on all of them 
must be removed before finally drying 
the film. The removing agent differs ac- 
cording to brand of film and includes 
plain water, alcohol, and carbon-tet- 
rachloride. 

Q:Have been using positive film for 
my titles and lately notice a fine white 
line extending up from bottom of 
frams. This does not occur in my regu- 
lar picture filming made on reversal 
film. A sample of each is enclosed. 
Please tell me cause of trouble and if 
it can be eliminated. — R. M. A., Ash- 
land, Kas. 

A: The mysterious line mentioned 
shows in both films. Reason you failed 
to notice it in your picture shots is that 
it is black because film was reversed. 
If you will examine both films closely 
you will notice line is not in same posi- 
tion on both films which suggests that 
it is a small hair lodged in aperture of 
film gate of your camera. Cleaning film 
aperture thoroughly will probably end 
your trouble. 



Q: For a Bibie picture I am filming, 
I plan to print titles in Old English 
type. I hate made titles with these let- 
ters in past but found they are not very 
legible, y<;t I feel Old English is most 
appropriate for my subject. Have you 
any suggestions? — Mrs. C. S., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

A: Accoraing to title sample accom- 
panying your letter, you are "cram- 
ming" too many words into the title 
area which further reduces the readibil- 
ity of the type used. Use no more than 
four or five words to the line when 
words are composed in old English and, 
of course, reduce number of words nec- 
essary for each title. 

Clarity of the highly decorative Old 
English lettering can be improved some- 
what by reducing exposure about one 
full stop. This will reduce contrast a 
trifle, but the fine lines will show up 
more clearly on the screen, make words 
easier to read. 

Q: In filming page of a book as an in- 
sert for my movie, a pronounced reflec- 
tion of light occurred along the bend 
of the page. The book is printed on 
Glossy paper. How can 1 re- film this 
page and avoid the reflection? — H. J., 
Pueblo, Colo. 

A: The reflection is probably due to 
fact lights were placed at either side of 
the book. Next time re-arrange lights, 
watching the troublesome curved edge 
until no reflection appears to the eye. 
It will be necessary to make observation 
with eye close as possible to lens po- 
sition. Placing lights at top and bottom 
instead of at either side of page will 
undoubtedly eliminate trouble. 

Q: What is the difference between a 



FULL INSTRUCTIONS 

in titling technique for home movies 
is given by George W. Cushman in 
his book, "How to Title Home Mov- 
ies," available to readers of HOME 
MOVIES at $1 a copy. If you regu- 
larly have followed Mr. Cushman's 
advice, you will want his exposition 
of basic titling technique, complete 
with illustrations on all phases of the 
subject. Send a dollar bill today for 
HOME MOVIES' complete textbook 
on this all important phase of movie 
making. It includes complete plans 
for building your own titler, too! 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PACE 189 



sub-title, descriptive title, and a spoken 
title?— W. A. M., Duluth, Minn. 

A: Any title occuring in the film af- 
ter the main and credit titles is termed 
a sub-title. A descriptive title is one in 
which facts are stated about the scene 
or subject filmed, for example: "The 
Gunnison attracts trout fishermen from 
all over America." A spoken title con- 
tains the quoted speech of one of the 
persons appearing within the scene, as: 
"Where were you on the night of June 
ioth?" Properly written, spoken titles 
begin and end with quotation marks. 

jQetb film 

our garden . . . 

• Continued from Page lj) 

aches that result from unaccustomed 
spading can be emphasized by having 
our gardener begin spading vigorously, 
then gradually slowing in tempo, final- 
ly stopping altogether from sheer ex- 
haustion. Or picture him a habitual time- 
killer who stops frequently to gaze at 
sky, inspect a clod of soil, throw rocks. 

Another gag idea is to bring a neigh- 
bor into the picture. Show the gardener 
spading and discovering angle worms in 
the freshly turned soil. This gives him 
a bright idea which he expresses by call- 
ing to his neighbor, showing him the 
worms, then whispering something 
about going fishing. A can of worms is 
dug, then both steal cautiously out of 
the yard. The gardener's absence is dis- 
covered later by his wife when she ap- 
pears on the scene ready to plant seeds. 

If our gardener is a golf bug, here's 
an idea appropriate for him: Each Sun- 
day finds our gardener at work, sweat- 
ing over spade or hoe, as his golfing pals 
pass his house on way to the links. They 
wisecrack as they pass, while our gar- 
dener pretends not to notice them. This 
goes on for several Sundays. Finally our 
gardener wins top prize in local Victory 
garden competition — a handsome cup 
that tops in size and splendor the tiny 
trophy awarded one of his pals in the 
Sunday golfing tournament. The com- 
parison inadvertently takes place as the 
golfers happen along just as the garden- 
ing awards are given out. 

Other gags can be fabricated from 
such ideas as having the gardener exam- 
ine the soil daily for first signs of 
sprouting seeds only to find the sprouts 
are weeds, or of his wife naively pulling 
up radishes and onions thinking them 
weeds. 

Of course we could follow a strictly 
serious vein and produce our gardening 
picture more from an instructional an- 
gle on good gardening practice. But for 
a family movie, the more humor it con- 
tains, the longer it will continue to en- 
tertain. And think of the greater fun 
to be had in filming it. 



Proce^Mng, 
bugaboo* 

• Continued from Page 176 



trast is present, the reversal process fol- 
lowed is o.k. 

If the sky-exposed frames are grey, it 
is possible the developer was old or did 
not have enough "kick" to it; or it 
could have been too cold. Many ama- 
teurs begin by using D-72 for home re- 
versal. D-72 is a wonderful, all around 
developer for general use in most any 
darkroom, but it is not satisfactory for 
home reversal. A more contrasty, faster 
working formula is required. Many 
good formulas have appeared in past is- 
sues of Home Movies and the whole 
process is outlined in the book "How to 
Reverse Movie Film" available from the 
publishers of Home Movies. 

A hazy appearance of the sky-exposed 
frames may be caused by insufficient 
developing in the first developer. To 
avoid this, continue for the full time 
and at the prescribed temperature 
which is practically always 60 0 Fah. 

A reversal job well done will leave 
edges, or any unexposed portion of the 
film, a deep black. If they are only a 
dark grey, either the first or second de- 
velopers may be at fault or the second 
development may not have been car- 
ried out long enough. Unless film appears 
rather muddy, it is better to use no hy- 
po bath at all. In case of doubt, wash 
and dry the film, then project it. If the 
hypo then appears necessary, the film 
can be washed in clear water and then 
given the bath. 

A yellowish cast or color is frequent- 
ly caused by the bleach not having been 
completely cleared away. The clearing 
bath should do this, although lately the 
trend has been to do away with the 
clearing bath. When fresh bleaching so- 
lutions are used, the yellow bleach col- 
or can be completely removed by a ten- 
minute vigorous washing in clear, cold 
running water. Stale or used solutions 
usually leave a yellowish cast on the 
film which cannot be removed. Some 
metals will combine with the bleach- 
ing solution and cause a chemical ac- 
tion which makes the stain harder to 
remove. If metal drums or trays (ex- 
cept stainless steel) are used, all metal 
parts should be covered either with acid 
resisting paint or pariffin. 

These constitute the main bugaboos 
encountered in home reversal. The 
worker sometimes runs into other ob- 
stacles of various kinds, but most of 
them are more or less uncommon and 
result from specific conditions in his 
own particular type of equipment or 
procedure. 



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"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS" featuring stunning 
beauties. Majorettes in action and Bathing Queens. 
SPECIAL Vol. 4, 50' 8mm. regularly $2.00 for $1.25; 
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Sample, complete lists. 10c in coin. Stamp brings all 
catalogues. No post cards, please. 

"PARTY PHONOGRAPH RECORDS" — New snap- 
py adult entertainment. Stamp brings catalogues, 

MISCELLANEOUS 
B AIA precision Atl-Metal 8mm. Film Slitter... $3.00 

BOLEX CINELAC. film preservative, bottle 1.00 

BOLEX LENS CLEANER, bottle 35 

WELD-ALL FILM CEMENT, safety or nitrate .30 
FOTOFADE DYE for making Chemical Fades.... 1.25 

FOTOFADE WIl'E-OFF TAPE, per roll 60 

CINETINTS. Set fi Colors with Instructions ... 3.25 

DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each 35 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
PERFORATING 16mm. films for double 8 

Cameras, 100 ft $2.00 

HOME MOVIES. Back Numbers. 1937-1938 15 

1940-1941-1942-1943 30 

1937 — May, June, Aug., Sept., Dec. 1938 — April, 
Tune, July, Aug., Sept., Oct. 1940 — March, April, 
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Dec. 1942— Feb.. April, May, June, July. Sept., Oct. 
1943— Jan., Feb., March, April. 

CAMERA SPOOLS WITH CANS— Each 

Double 8 50c Univex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS Double 8mm. and Single 8 slze....l0c 
MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
CINE-KODAK POSITIVE TITLE FILM 
Laboratory Packed. Photoflood Light. Speed 6. 
Dbl. 8—33 ft. 65c; 100 ft. $1.50; Sgl. 8 — 33 ft. 45c; 
100 ft. $1.00; 16mm. 100 ft. $1.25; 8mm. Clear, 
Salmon Pink, Lavender. 16mm. Clear, Red, Special 
Blue. These tints available while limited supply 
lasts. For duration, all will be clear base. 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orders 
Cash, Check or M. O. for quick service. 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST. JOSEPH ST. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




Hollywood Azure . . 

ESO-D 

Our new popular MONOCOLOR 8mm. 
emulsion for all double 8mm. and 
Tnivex 8mm. cameras. Prices quoted below include spool- 
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and slit ready for projection under license with the East- 
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ESO-D — An attractive azure ortlio film for home movies, 
projecting as an attractive sky-blue. Excellent supple- 
ment for Kodachrome movies. $1.30 psr spool. $3.65 per 
three spools. 

ESO-A ortho at $1.20; ESO-B super-ortho at $1.25; 
ESO-C Sepia at $1.30; ESO-G scarlet at $1.25 and two 
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SEPTEMBER 1st, 1943 

.... Marks the close of all ESO-S laboratory services 
for the duration! This means that: 



All ESO-S films sold WITH PROCESSING (or 
without processing) must be postmarked not later 
than September 1st if we are to finish them for ycu. 
Those received after that date must necessarily be 
returned for processing elsewhere. 
All free film bonuses must be redeemed before 
Sept. 1st. In most instances these are not payable 
in cash, but in trade, only, 
ire giving three months' notice so that you will have 
time to expose your ESO-S films and get them to us in 
time. This date. September 1st. is final. Please get those 
films to us as soon as possible to avoid disappointment! 

ESO-S PICTURES 

3945 CENTRAL KANSAS CITY. MO. 



I. 



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PAGE 190 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 




cAre title* properly, placed- 

• Continued from Page 779 



IT'S FASCINATING . . . 

Thousands of movie amateurs are 
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finding it as much fun as shooting. 
It makes for economy, too. Find out 
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Tells you how to process 8mm. and 
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Well worth the price of joc. 




LABEL IT! 

What's a movie without a name — a 
TITLE? How will your audience 
understand your picture without 
explanatory titles? Learn how easy 
it is to make your own. This easy- 
to-understand book tells everything 
you want to know about this fasci- 
nating branch of the home movie 
hobby. Gives tables for exposures, 
lens diopters, field areas, etc. Mailed 
prepaid for only $1.00. 

On Sale At Dealers Or Order Direct From 

HOME MOVIES 

6040 SUNSET BOULEVARD 
HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 



bf so written it can be placed before or 
after peak of an action sequence and 
lose none of its effect. In spite of the 
emphasis placed on brief, terse, titles, it 
often becomes expedient to use one 
lengthy title in place of several short 
ones in order to avoid cutting frequent- 
ly into important action. But even in 
such instances, brevity should be the 
watchword in composition. 

Again taking our deep sea fishing 
film for example, let us assume we have 
a sequence picturing bringing a mar- 
tin swordfish to gaff, consisting of the 
following scenes: medium shot of fish- 
erman in deck chair fighting the hooked 
fish; long shot of fish cavorting in wa- 
ter at end of line; telephoto shot of 
fish fighting line; repeat shot of fisher- 
man reeling in line; medium shot of fish 
now nearer boat. Another fisherman in 
foreground with gaff hook, ready to as- 
sist with landing of fish. Struggling fish 
is gaffed and hauled aboard. 

Some filmers might insert brief titles 
between every one of these scenes such 
as: "Joe hooks a marlin!" "The marlin 
fights back. . . ." "Looks like she's 
safe!" "Landed at last!" — four annoy- 
ing interruptions in a highly interesting 
sequence. How much better to precede 
the sequence thus: "Third time out Joe 
hooks and safely lands a fighting mar- 
lin!" and then conclude with: "One 
hundred twenty-five pounds of fighting 
fish for which Joe gave up five!" 

The nature of a film sequence and 
subject of film itself will dictate where 
titles should be placed. In most in- 
stances, titles will precede scenes or ac- 
tion they describe. Yet there are in- 
stances where a descriptive title is bet- 
ter placed after the scene it refers to. 
This, of course, must be determined be- 
fore title is written. 

In photoplays that build to a heavy 
action climax, it is best to taper off on 
titles as much as possible in the closing 
sequences so that the climax will not be 
retarded. Then there are pictures in 
which this rule should be reversed — 
the climax or high point of interest may 
be accented by means of titles. An ex- 
ample of this would be in a documen- 
tary picture in which some process or 
operation is being demonstrated. Take 
for example an Indian forming pottery 
on a primitive potter's wheel. A sequence 
of this action would be greatly strength- 
ened by the addition of two or three 
short titles giving pertinent facts re- 
garding the Indian's pottery making op- 
erations, his reputation as a potter, and 
perhaps the price he may ask for the fin- 



ished article. The sequence might be 
considered complete without such titles, 
but few will deny that titles would add 
much in interest to the picture as a 
whole without proving too diverting. 

Also, such titles tend to consume 
time where a long operation must be 
filmed in almost continuous action. Un- 
like with the deep sea fishing film where 
the camera might run continuously on 
the interest-absorbing action of the fish- 
landing incident, continuous camera 
action on the Indian pottery maker 
would play far too long on the screen 
unless otherwise broken up by titles. 
The skilled filmer, of course, would fur- 
ther diversify this sequence by intercut- 
ting closeups and angle shots of the 
action. 

Where action in the film is slow, ti- 
tles should balance the action and re- 
main on the screen longer by virtue of 
gi eater wording. In action sequences, 
the audience, as a rule, becomes alert 
and capable of reading brief titles quick- 
ly. A good rule to follow in filming ti- 
tles is to allow more footage than the 
established reading time and then cut 
them into the picture their full length.. 
In this way, it will be much easier to 
determine how long a title should run 
on the screen by projecting the picture 
several times. Where titles are too long 
in footage, they can be shortened. But 
those filmed too short, must be remade. 
In the long run, all titles are better if 
they are too long than too short in 
screening time. In every large audience, 
there is at least one or two spectators 
whose ability to read is hampered by 
poor vision, or perhaps because of the 
small lettering in the title. 

Spoken titles are controlled by none 
of the rules or regulations that apply 
to the descriptive title except, perhaps, 
that they should be as brief as possible. 
The point of insertion in the film for 
the spoken title is determined by the 
action; yet many amateur filmers con- 
tinue to cut in a spoken title before or 
after the scene showing the person 
speaking. 

For the most natural effect, let the 
scene run a few frames to show the 
person starting to speak, then cut in the 
title, and continue with four or five 
frames at end of scene showing person 
completing speech. Where the speech is 
U ng, it becomes necessary to delete 
some of the footage in middle of the 
pictured action, allowing the title to 
"do the talking" instead of the person 
in the picture. 

Another technique is to cut directly 
from the title, not back to the person 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PAGE 191 



talking, but to the person spoken to. In 
the example illustrated at beginning of 
this article, the suitor is shown holding 
a box of candy up for his girl (out of 
scene) to see, saying: "I have brought 
two bits worth of candy." The next 
scene following title showed the girl, 
exclaiming joy and rushing toward him 



to receive the candy. 

So give a thought, when cutting in 
your titles, to the right point at which 
to splice in each title. Unless you do, the 
film will be cut, the title will be spliced, 
and it will then be too late to move it 
fonvard or backward a few frames to 
gain the intended effect. 



J^engtlten life 0/ Pkotofloodi 



• Continued from Page 180 

on underside of panel, the screws being 
inserted at the top. Toggle switch C 
was then mounted and the three units 
wired as per diagram with No. 14 rub- 
ber insulated wire. It is important that 
no lighter gauge wire be used. The dou- 
ble-pole throw switch A was next 
mounted in place and wires connected 
to the six terminals. 

In this case, switch A is a no-V 
30-amp. type, bakelite encased and hav- 
ing six terminal connections — two at 
each end and one at center of each side. 
The switch lever has three positions: 
center or vertical is "Off," and when 
set at either end, voltage is switched 
to terminals at opposite end. 

When all units are properly wired, 
it may be observed that the main switch 
A controls two circuits — one at a time. 
One circuit position indicated by "Dim" 
conveys current to the two twin re- 
ceptacles in series, thus reducing fila- 
ment voltage of photofloods plugged 
into receptacles 1, 2, 3, and 4. Throw- 
ing the switch to "Bright" position on 
panel places all photofloods in parallel 
and they receive the full filament volt- 
age. Function of switch C has already 
been explained. 

Exterior of the voltage control box 



can be finished to suit individual taste. 
For practical purposes, I gave mine sev- 
eral coats of black shellac then rubbed 
it down to a satin finish with pumice. 
The figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 opposite the 
receptacles were stamped into the panel 
with numbering dies; the words 
"Bright," "Off" and "Dim" were en- 
graved upon the panel with a sharp 
pointed tool. These engravings were 
then filled with white caseine paint, 
the panel then rubbed free of paint and 
the paint filled engravings allowed to 
dry. Number 2 photofloods may also be 
controlled by this device but, in such 
instances, no more than three No. 2 
lamps should be used unless it has been 
established that the house wiring is ade- 
quate to handle the high resistance of 
three or more No. 2 photofloods through 
a single outlet. 

The voltage control box should never 
be plugged into a floor or table lamp, 
but directly into the baseboard or wall 
outlet. Floor and table lamps are wired 
too lightly to accommodate the resist- 
ance of a multiple of photofloods. 

Another use for the voltage control 
box is in title making where it may be 
put to good use in dimming the lights 
between title takes. 



information pleaie . 



• Continued from Page 16S 

print. Failing to do this will cause 
duped print to be out of focus. Another 
cause is lack of constant pressure 
against the films to insure positive con- 
tact. 

Animation (Dwight A. Boyce, Lud- 
low, Mass.) 

Q: I am planning to do animation 
work in Kodachrome, using a Revere 
camera with f . 5 lens and working 
with jointed, movable dolls (which I 
shall make myself) and miniature sets 
in color. Since my camera does not 
have a single frame release, I shall have 
to operate by the "trigger finger action" 
method — pressing the release button 
just enough to allow exposure of one 
frame at a time. 



What should I use for lights and how 
near the miniature set can I work? 
What diaphragm opening should I use? 
Would it be practical to film the minia- 
ture sets out of doors, using a white 
sheet to diffuse sunlight and sunlight 
reflectors at either side? 

A: If you wish to work indoors with 
type A Kodachrome, use regular Photo- 
floods — if you can get them. Otherwise 
you may be obliged to film the entire 
production in daylight, diffiusing the 
sunlight as you suggest. The diaphragm 
opening can best be determined by us- 
ing your exposure meter and a grey 
card — taking the reading from the grey 
card placed in front of object to be 
photographed and, of course, with the 
light as it will be used in photograph- 



CUT HOME MOVIE COSTS 




with BLACK and WHITE fine 

grain Semi-Orthochromatie Re- 
versible Film for finest result! — 
lowest cost. 

16mm. Reversible Outdoor Film 

100-rt Roll, only $2.50 

Rating Scheiner 18 



PROJECTION STEEL REELS 

400 ft. reel — 14mm 35c each 

200 ft. reel — 16mm. 25c each 

200 ft. reel — 8mm 35c each 

400 ft. reel — 8mm 50c each 

Minimum Order 3 Reels 

Write for prices [or developing and processing for 
8mm. and 16mm. films bought elsewhere. 

Visual Instruction Supply Corp. 

1757 Broadway Dept. 12 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

For Your Son or Daughter 



HOLLYWOOD STARS 

autographed photos 



5"x7" (suitable for framing) 

Clark Gable, Roy Rogers, Gary Cooper, Joan Fon- 
taine, Bing Crosby, Rita Hayworth, Charles Boyer, 
Humphrey Bogart, Joe E. Brown, John Boles, Jack 
Carson, Lana Turner, Linda Darnell, Bill Elliott, Errol 
Flynn, Cary Grant, William Holden, Louis Hayword, 
Bob Hope, Arthur Lake, Joan Leslie, Robert Mont- 
gomery, Edward O'Brien, Tyrone Power, Mickey 
Rooney, Tex Ritter, Rosalind Russell, Larry Simms, 
Randolph Scott. Charles Starrett, Sally Wadsworth, 
Loretta Young. 

25c apiece — 5 for $1.00 
HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 

6408 Selma Hollywood, Calif. 

*************************** 



EVERY 8MM. FAN WANTS 

CINE EXTENAR 

It's the new WIDE ANGLE 
lens that every cine fan 
needs to catch the whole 
picture. Simply screws 
ever regular (mm. I*ni, 
providing identical focus 
and definition plus a WIDE 
ANGLE. $27.50 
FOR FULL PARTICULARS. WRITK TODAY 

CAMERA SPECIALTY CO. 

48 West 29th Street New York City 




Kodachrome 



MAPS CHARTS FINE TITLES 

GIO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY 

Special Motion Picture Printing 
995-A Merchandise Mart, Chicago 



8mm. 16mm. 
Hollywood Ambertinr Film 

Excellent Outdoor Film Wide Latitude. 
25 Ft. Dbl. 8, $1.25 1 00 Ft. 1 6, $2.50 
including machine processing 

HOLLYWOOD LAND STUDIOS 

9320 CALIFORNIA AVE. SOUTH GATE, CALIF. 
Despite Rumors Plenty of Film Available 



PB MOVIE FILTER KIT FOR COLORFILM 

for REVERE CAMERAS 

Including I Screw-in-Sunshade, I Haze Filter, 
I Type A Filter, I pouch fc£ 7C 

complete «* 

From All Leading Camera Dealers or 

PONDER & BEST 

1015 SO. GRAND AVE.. LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 



PACE 192 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



FOR ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS! 

* Harrison CINE KIT 




4 FILTERS and DUAL-SNAP SHADE TO MEET 
ALL MOVIE FILTER NEEDS — both Kodachrome 
and Black and White. 

The new Harrison CINE KIT contains a special Aero 
Lock Ring, a Dual-Snap Aluminum Sunshade, and the 
following de luxe Duraline Filters YL-6. GY-4. 
RD-4. and GR-4. Case is of durable 5-oz. Elkhlde, 
felt lined. $6.95 and up. 



(If desired, Kodachrome users 
may substitute a C-4 and 
HAZE filter for any two of 
the above. ) 



Write for Free 
Illustrated Folder 
Today 



HARRISON & HARRISON 

OPTICAL ENGINEERS 
8351 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood. Calif. 



WORLD'S 
GREATEST SHOW 
RENTAL LIBRARY 

NOW! You can see all of latest WAR 
and CURRENT EVENTS released by 
CASTLE and other producers, with 
our new ECONOMICAL RENTAL 
PLAN. Write for details. 

KENWOOD FILMS 

818 E. 47th St. Chicago, III. 



Distinctive TITLES 
and expert EDITING 

For the Amateur and Professional 

16MM. — 8MM. 
Black and White - - Kodachrome 
Write for our new illustrated catalog 
STAHL EDITING & TITLING SERVICE 
33 West 42nd Street New York, N. Y. 

OUTSTANDING SAVINGS 

~ — ~~ "~ ~ ' " I6mm. ~~~ 
BULK MOVIE FILM 
Need film? We can supply it at substantial savings. 
Check these amazing prices: 

100', 16mm. Regular, Weston 8 $1.35 

100', 16mm. Colortone Weston 8 1.55 

100', 16mm. Plus, Weston 12 1.55 

100', 16mm. Pan No. 24. Weston 24 3.60 

100', 16mm. Pan No. 100. Weston 100 3.95 

(Includes Excise Tax) 
Make tremendous savings by buying your film in 
bulk and spooling it at home. 

Complete equipment including chemicals and devel- 
opings outfits for home processing. 
Also, film on camera spools, processing charges in- 
cluded. Write today for free. Amazing Price List on 
film, accessories and processing charges, also lists of 
selected 16mm. sound and silent home movie subjects. 
We reserve the right to limit quantities. When 
ordering by mail, please include postage charges. 

SUPERIOR BULK FILM COMPANY 
188 W. Randolph St. Dept. 6-HM Chicago. Illinois 



GLAMOUR^ 
GIRL 

MOVIES!;?"'^ r' LM N C0 Y - 

S Box 2IHM Ithaca, N. Y. 



NEW! Newsreel No. 4 fea- 
turing beautiful majorettes! 
50 ft. 8mm.. Special, $1.00 

I (Reg. $2.00). 100 ft. 16mm.. 

>$2.50 (Reg. $4.00) Sample 

I cut and lists, 10c. 



BACK ISSUES 

The HOME MOVIES issues you missed con- 
tain much valuable movie making information 
you need. We can still supply a limited num- 
ber of hack issues at original single copy price 
—25 c^nts. ORDER TODAY. 

HOME MOVIES 

6060 SUNSET BLVD. HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



ing the shot. Shooting out of doors, you 
will have to watch the direction of your 
light as the sun changes position. Ani- 
mation and single-frame photography is 
a tedious and lengthy process and you 
may find it experient to so mount your 
miniature stage that it may be revolved 
in order to keep it facing the sun 
throughout the day. 

Tinted Titles (N. Bostwick, Bayonne, 
N. J.) 

Q: I'm interested in the economical 
method of making titles for Koda- 
chrome films by shooting them on black 
and white positive film, then coloring 
the titles to harmonize with the color 
shots with which they are to be spliced. 
Please advise how I can color the titles 
myself. I've heard of some tints manu- 
factured by Edwal for this purpose. 

A: Edwal Fototints may be used to 
add color to black and white films and 
to tint black and white titles for Koda- 
chrome movies. The process is very in- 
expensive and you will find it much 
cheaper to make titles for your color 
films in this way than using the more 
expensive and increasingly hard-to-get 
color film. Most photo dealers carry Ed- 
wal Phototints in stock or you may 
write direct to Edwal Laboratories, Inc., 
732 Federal St., Chicago, 111. 

cAmateur 3dm 



• • • 



• Continued from Page 170 

paper sack, they laze about a pic- 
turesque brook, fishing, wading and 
playing. The dog is forever finding the 
boys' hidden lunch bag and stealing a 
sandwich. Boys find frogs, fry frog 
legs, bake potatoes in fire, then go for a 
swim, fish some more — all the nostalgic 
pastimes of youth. 

In reviewing this picture, we find a 
beautifully photographed film that 
lacks only the slow, lazy tempo so nec- 
essary to imply the nostalgic mood in- 
tended. Little intimate bits of action 
should have been caught by the camera 
in closeup to build greater interest. For 
instance, in the fishhook baiting scenes, 
it is not immediately apparent what 
the boys are about. Also, it would have 
been more effective to show closeups of 
the bag of lunch frequently to reveal 
exactly how much damage the dog was 
inflicting upon it each time he ferreted 
it out from a new hiding place. Per- 
haps a closeup of the dog actually eat- 
ing one of the sandwiches would have 
conveyed the idea more vividly. But 
then, perhaps, that is all the lunch the 
boys actually had with them the day 
the scenes were filmed. A little more 
cohesion in the story might make this 
a potential Movie of the Month. 



J\ead( 



er { 




Reloading Magazine 

Sirs: D. W. Lineberry, in "The Reader 
Speaks," March 1943 issue, tells how 
to reload 8mm. film magazines with 
title film. Would appreciate your advice 
as to whether or not 16mm. film maga- 
zines are similar in construction and if 
Lineberry's instructions also apply to 
reloading 1 6mm. magazines. — Maxwell 
Goodsitt, New York, N. Y. 

• Construction of 16mm. film maga- 
zines differs from the eights. Readers 
who have reloaded 16mm. magazines 
successfully are invited to offer sugges- 
tions through this column. — Ed. 

Sound For Eights 

Sirs: Why doesn't someone design an 
alteration kit to convert 8mm. projec- 
tors for sound so that we, too, may 
project sound movies along with our si- 
lent films? Enclosed is a sketch which 
suggests enlarging 8mm. film to 10mm. 
in width, allowing an extra 2mm. for 
sound track. 

On my Revere projector, one would 
need only to remove the flanges on one 
side of the upper and lower sprockets 
and alter film gate slightly to accommo- 
date the extra width of the sound film. 
Of course, a faster mechanism would be 
needed to provide the 24 f.p.s. speed. 
But this should be relatively simple. — 
Rollin D. Schreffler, Cleveland, Ohio. 

• You may be interested to know that 
one amateur we know has already pro- 
duced successful sound tracks on 8mm. 
film. The picture area is reduced, as 
with 1 6mm., and a variable area sound 
track runs between picture area and 
sprocket holes. Watch for complete 
story of this far-reaching amateur de- 
velopment in the July issue. — Ed. 



amera 



• Continued from Page lyS 

empty camera and learn how to improve 
their picture making; but scores have 
proven it can be done. This month's 
project on improving camera view- 
points should add further to their skill; 
and if your camera technique needs pol- 
ishing and you have not yet joined our 
army of filmless practice "Projecteers" 
we suggest you start this month and 
work back to previous practice projects 
outlined in earlier issues. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



PACE 193 



TITLES sJ 



By EDMUND TURNER 



WARTIME 
AMERICA 




his story to 
Start... and gfce 
other tforieS...startS 
atthele£iniiiri£! 



HESE title cards, which are a regular feature of Home Movies each 
month, are designed especially for use with typewriter titles or any 
home-made titler that will photograph at a distance of 8 inches. 
Save all of them for future use. Cut them out and paste on 
file cards, using rubber cement. 






^ FATHER'S 
DAW OFF 





PAGE 194 



HOME MOVIES FOR JUNE 



CLASSIFIED 



ADVERTISING 



EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 



• BASS SAYS: Don't let the war stop your cine 
making. Bass has the goods. 

USED 8MM. CAMERAS 
Keystone 8, F:3.5 lens and case. $27.50. 
Cine Kodak 8 Model 20, F:3.5 lens and case. $30.00. 
Cine Kodak Model 25. F:2.7 lens, $34.50. 
Revere Model 88, F:2.5 lens and case, $49.50. 

USED I6MM. CAMERAS 

Simplex Pockette. magazine load. Kodak F:3.5 lens, 
$27.50. 

Filmo 75. 100 ft. capacity, F:3.5 lens, $47.50. 

Bell & Howell Filmo 70A, Cooke F:3.5 lens and case, 
$47.50. 

Cine Kodak Model E. F:l.9 Kodak Anastigmat, 
$64.50. 

Victor 3 Turret, F:3.5 lens focusing mount, $67.50. 
Cine Kodak Model A, F:3.5 lens, $50.00. 

Cine Kodak Model B, 100 ft., I" F: 1 .9 lens in fo- 
cusing mount, interchangeable 3%" Wollensak 
F:3.3 with case, $98.50. 

Cine Kodak Magazine, F:l.9 lens, $110.00. 

Victor Model 3 Turret, 15mm. Wollensak fixed fo- 
cus F:2.7 I" Wollensak F:2.7, 2" Wollensak F:3.5 
and case, $125.00 

Victor Model 4 Turret, with I" Dallmeyer Triple 
Anastigmat F:2.9 fixed focus, I" Cooke F:l.8 
focusing, 3" Telecor Telate F:3.5, case, $167.50. 

Bell & Howell Automaster Turret, with I" Dall- 
meyer F: 1 .5, 2" Wollensak F:3.5, 4" Xenar F:3.8, 
objective finders, combination case, $382.50. 

LENSES 

Hard-to-get Cine Lenses in stock. Focal lengths up 
to 6" including Cooke, Hugo Meyer, Dallmeyer 
and complete stock of new Wollensak lenses 
from wide angle to 6". Write for quotations. 

DESIRABLE ACCESSORIES 

Universal Titlers, made of aluminum, complete with 
magnifying letters, models for all standard cam- 
eras .each, $6.95. 

Cinematographer's Handbook and Reference Guide 
in stock, $3.50. 

Arrerican Photographic Exposure Computor, $1.00. 

The Camera Photo Pocket Guide, $1.00. 

We buy 'em, sell 'em and trade 'em. Complete 
stocks of new Cine Equipment all makes. Send 
for Bass Supplementary List of Cine Equipment 
up to date. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY, Dept. HC, 179 W. 
Madison St., Chicago, Illinois. 

• CINE SPECIAL for sale only with Auricon re- 
corder, $975.00. Both like new. Fine lenses avail- 
able to buyer. Auricon alone, $525.00. Trade 16mm. 
lenses for Filmo sportster. BOX 66, HOME MOVIES, 
6C60 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 

• HOW I ADDED sound to my 8mm. projector. 
Information and sketches will be given for $1.00. 
D. SARCONE, 3239 Fenton Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

WANTED 

• WILL PAY $10.00 per 250 feet of MA inch East- 
man direct positive paper. State expiration. PEER- 
LESS VENDING MACHINE CO., Dept. HM, 220 
West 42nd St., N. Y. City. 

WILL PAY CASH for 16mm. Silent and Sound Pro- 
jectors. Give complete description including make, 
model, condition and price. ERKER BROS., 610 
Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 

• REVERE projector and case, model 80 or 85. 
State model and price, new or used. Will pay cash. 
K. S. OLSEN, 5817 Helen St., St. Louis, Mo. 

• BELL & HOWELL 70 DA or other 16mm. movie 
camera and projector wanted for cash. J. FRASER, 
748 Trinity Ave., N. Y. City. 

• WANTED — Cine Special camera or outfit in 
good condition, Cash. Write A. CONRICH, 645 
Westend Ave., N. Y. City. 

• WANTED— I lens f/1.6, 2" No. L2006 for model 
138 Bell & Howell Filmosound. ALLEN MOTOR 
CO., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

• WANTED— 8mm. movie camera and projector, 
cash. I. FELS. 245 W. i04th St., I6C, N. Y. City 



Have you Some- 
thing to sell? 



Turn it into cash with 
classified ad! 



a Home Movies 



RATES: Ten cents per word; minimum 
charge, $2 cash with order. Closing date, 
10th of preceding month. HOME MOVIES 
does not guarantee goods advertised. Send 
ad copy to 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, California. 



FILM RELEASES 



WANTED 



• WANTED: Used equipment. Bargain list on re- 
quest. PETERS, 41-B South 4th St., Allentown, Pa. 

FILM RELEASES 

• I6MM. SOUND Film BargainsT targe library of 
features and shorts being liquidated. All films new 
or like new. Send stamp for list. Act fast! They 
won't stay long. TED KRUGER, 4928 Ella St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. — • 



• "THE KODAK GIRL" starring Peggy Tippett; 
"Magazine Cover Girl" starring Francine Couni- 
han, Georgia Sothern; "Glamour Dance" starring 
Rosita Royce; "Rumba" starring Caroline Ayres — 
100 ft. 16mm. $5.15. 50 ft. 8mm. $4.15 shipped pre- 
paid. GRIFFITH FILM CO., Box 21, Ithaca. N. Y. 

~» WORLD'S most beautiful girls! New releases dV~ 
Bruno of Hollywood in 8 and 16mm. Also Amazing 
Bargains and Glamour Newsreel. Complete lists 
and Kodachrome sample travel film a dime. KEN- 
WOOD FILMS, 818 East 47th St., Chicago. III. 



BINDERS 



for 



HOME MOVIES 



with 



YOUR NAME ENGRAVED 



$ 1.50 



insert or remove each magazine. In- 
valuable for those who save each 
copy for reference. 



We pay postage 

HOME MOVIES 



6060 Sunset Blvd. 



• READY NOW! Victory Bulletin No. 3. Bigger and 
Better. Exchange, rent, sell 8mm.-l6mm. films. Its 
the Easy Way Film Library plan. Send 10c. NU-ART 
FILMS. I45 West 45th St., New York. 

• 8MM-I6MM sound and silent -films, projectors 
and cameras — bought, sold and exchanged. Trades 
or terms accepted. Free bargain bulletin. ZENITH 
308 West 44th, New York. 

• 8MM. "The Three Stooges," "Our Gang" com- 
edies, "Frank Buck" iungle adventures. Also cor- 
tcons, scenic and travel, westerns and sports 
STREM LAB. 5344 West Ohio, Chicago, III. 

• EXCHANGE your I6mm. full subjects used or 
new for brand new 8mm. subjects. No exchange 
fee. Also send for free lists of 8mm.-l6mm. subjects, 
cartoons, comedies. ABBE, I265 Broadway, N. Y. C. 

• COMPLETE I6mm. sound subiects, perfect, $5.75. 
Odd sound reels, $2.00. All sizes film bought, sold, 
exchanged. Catalogues, sample film. 10c. INTER- 
NATIONAL. 2I20 Straus, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

• JOIN Easy Way Film Library — exchange, rent 
8mm.-l6mm. films. Send 10c for Victory Bulletin. 
NU-ART FILMS, I45 West 45th St., New York. 



• SOUND and Silent Films exchanged, bought 
sold, rented. Bargains always. New Free lists. 
FRANK LANE, 5 Little Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

• 8MM. FILMS! All major producers. New-used 
prints. Sales, exchanges, trade-ins. REIDEL FILMS, 

Dept. HM-643. 3207 Joslyn Rd., Cleveland. Ohio. 



• BARGAIN! Glamour Newsreel No. 4. majorettes 
and beauty queens, 50 ft. 8mm. regularly $2.00, 
only $1.00 (16mm. 100 ft. $2.50). Complete lists, 
samples, 10c. JENKINS, 392 Elmira, N. Y. 



* 

■¥ 
* 



Each binder holds 12 copies. Easy to ^ 
* HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA * 



EXCHANGE 



• WILL EXCHANGE RCA Portable Battery Radio, 
luggage type finish, in good operating condition 
without batteries. Cost $35 new . . for good used 
f:3.5 Eastman or Revere 8mm. camera. F. GROSS, 
5373 San Vicente Blvd.. Los Angeles, Calif. 



FILMS FOR EXCHANCE 

• BUY More Bonds and yet enjoy Better Films 
by adopting our inexpensive exchange plan: Si'en* 
pictures, $1.00 reel; sound $2.00. Also sell. Free 
catalogue. Selected sound program, reasonable 
rentals. Send for Victory B Bulletin. BETTER FILMS, 
742 New Lots Ave., Brooklyn. N. Y. 



PROCESSING SERVICE 

• MOTION picture processing. 100' 16mm., 75c; 

50 16mm., 50c; 25' 8/8mm., 35c; 25' 8mm., 25c; 

RITTER FILM SERVICE, 629 Lyman Ave., Oak 
Park, III. 



TITLING 

• TITLING and Close-up Lens Kit — Six supple- 
mentary lenses of 16", 18", 20", 24", 32" and 
40" focal lengths. Can be used on all titlers which 
provide for interchange of lenses. Also ideal for 
general close-up photography. Complete kit $3.00. 
Separate ienses, 60c each. Also available in 6". 8", 
and 12" focal lengths for ultra-closeup work. 
HOLLYWOOD CINE PRODUCTS CO., 3221 So. 
Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



• TITLE your own films. This complete, illustrated 
book tells how. Shows how to build your own titler; 
how to develop positive titles; how to make trick 
titles, etc. Title lettering and composition explained. 
Replete with charts and tables on diopters, field 
areas, etc. Send $1.00 today for HOW TO TITLE 
HOME MOVIES written by George Cushman. VER 
HALEN PUBLICATIONS. 6060 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

• STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS! Before your photos 
of individuals can be sold with safety, you must 
have a model release giving legal right to sell 
the picture for publication or advertising purposes. 
Model release forms are now available, really 
prin'ed in authentic legal manner, 50 for 25c (coin) 
postpaid. VER HALEN PUBLICATIONS 6060 Sunset 
Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 




MEANY, Ml NY 

and M 0 E 

"The Three Monkeys" 



In 8mm and 16mm 
for 

HOME PROJECTORS! 



Take our word for it — Meany, Miny, Moe animated 
cartoons give zest to any home movie program. Begin 
now and build a library of these entertaining films — 
then when family movies are shown, spring a surprise 
with a screening of real, professionally-produced 
animated cartoons. 

Free Air 1201 -A 

Beauty Shop 1 202-A 

Christmas Cheer I 205 -A 

The Golf Robot 1 206- A 

Beauty and the Beast 1208 -A 

Ship Wrecked 1209-A 

High and Dixzy 1210-A 

Pickled Herring 121 1 -A 

Red Hot Tires 121 2- A 

The Auto Race 1213-A 

Midnight Spooks 1214-A 

House of Tricks 1215-A 

100-Foot— 16 mm. $3.00 

50-Foot — 8mm. 1.50 




^BOSKO" 

". To* »« aiUb , l C Here are 

"en js 

cartoon »« lmS ,, lke Start your 
1801-^ 

. circus f»« s - , 8 04-A 

B °* Bear Escape )80 5-A 

SpooWs 1807-A 

Bad Dream )g0 9-A 
Boskos Ba° Capers 

Bosko's Cann-bal ^ 

100 Ft. ^mm. , 50 

50 ^ 8mm ' TR ATE THESE flU* 
eB TO DEMONSTRATE 

ASK YOUR 




WRITE 
FOR 
CATALOG! 



f 



HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, inc. 



6060 SUNSET BOULEVARD 



HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



IMOSOUND V' ' othie ve- 
. FUmosoun-. giH lraa.«'«»n°» pert , 



Here's a MUST for your next OCD meeting 

TWO TERRIFIC BATTLE ACTIONS IN ONE FILM 

"BATTLE FOR TUNISIA" — Actual battle scenes filmed during the cam- 
paign in North Africa. The most amazing tank action ever filmed . . .with 
opposing forces in full camera range! 




"SURRENDER AT STALINGRAD"— Captured German film shows the 
blasting attack on the Russian stronghold . . . then, on Russian film, 
the thrilling end of this historic siege. 



How about helping train First Aiders for your 
local Red Cross Unit ... or showing the new releases, 
"Battle for Tunisia" and "Surrender at Stalingrad," at 
your next OCD meeting ... or helping a local war plant 
lick a personnel problem? 

Yes, you can do these and other vital jobs for your com- 
munity . . . by making your Filmo Projector available 
when and where it's needed . . . and by teaming up with 
the Filmosound Library. In this vast collection of films are 
the very ones your community may need to do a morale- 
building job ... to instruct war workers ... or to provide 
an hour or an evening of precious relaxation. 

Let the Filmosound Library team up with you and your 
Filmo Projector . . . give your town, your neighborhood, 
your children's school a powerful new weapon in the 
home-front fight. 

TO DO THIS IMPORTANT WORK your Filmo Projector 
must be at its peak of efficiency. Send it to us for com- 
plete reconditioning. Trained factory technicians examine, 
clean, oil the mechanism . . . repair or replace worn parts 
and return your projector in factory-perfect working 
order. Your camera dealer will get estimates for you and 
will help you pack your projector for safe shipment to us. 



These will record a Victorious America for you . • • after the war is won 



Filmo "Companion" 8 Camera 

**Drop-in" loading 
— no sprockets. 
Four speeds plus 
single- frame con- 
trol. Interchange- 
able F3.5 lens. 
Finder masks for 
special lenses. 
Built-in exposure 
chart. As always, 
precision - made 
and Lifetime Guar- 
anteed. 




Filmoarc Projector 

Engineered as an 
arc projector, this 
16mm. machine 
provides sufficient 
light forlarge audi- 
toriums. High out- 
put amplifier and 
two high-fidelity 
permanent magnet 
dynamic speakers 
included. Shows 
sound or silent film. 




Filmo Auto Load Camera 

Color or mono- 
chrome film in- 
stantly inter- 
changeable in mid- 
reel with pre- 
threaded film car- 
tridge. Four speeds 
plus single-frame 
exposure. F2.7 lens 
andbrilliantfinder. 
Built-in exposure 
chart for both color 
and monochrome. 





Eyemo Camera 

The "tailor-made*' 
camera. Your needs 
dictate its specifi- 
cations. Seven 
standard models 
plus a complete se- 
lection of preci- 
sion -engineered 
accessories give you 
a wide selection of 
ideal equipment 
for almost every 
camera job. 



Filmo 70-D Camera 




Long-time favorite 
of serious workers, 
it gives youtheater- 
quality pictures. 
Loads with 50- or 
00-foot spools of 
16mm. color or 
monochrome film. 
Operates at seven 
speeds. Three -lens 
turret head equip- 
ped w ith your selec- 
tion of fine lenses. 



Filmo "Master" 16mm. Projector 

750 - watt lamp. 
Fast F1.6 lens, 
instantly inter- 
changeable. 
Equipped with 
clutch, reverse. and 
two-way tilt. 
" Safe- lock " 
sprockets prevent 
incorrect film 
threading and 
damaged film. Fa- 
mous B&H all- 
gear drive. 




BUY 
WAR BONDS 



WHEN YOU ORDER new lamps, remember to return the old ones. New lamps can 
be sold only when old lamps are turned in. 

"E" FOR EXCELLENCE — how the Army-Navy Award for Extraordinary Performance 
is won and presented is shown by this one-reel sound him. Service charge 50c. 



MOTION PICTURE CAMERAS AND PROJECTORS 



PRECISION- 
MADE BY 




THOSE HOME MOVIES OF YESTERYEAR — 

You'll be showing them more than ever, 
these days when your youngsters are in 
uniform far away. Your precious films will 
look better — and keep better — if you let us 
clean and "Vap-O-rate" them. This pro- 
fessionally-proven process makes film im- 
pervious to moisture and oil, and greatly 
increases resistance to scratches and heat. 
Bell & Howell Company, Chicago; New 
York; Hollywood; Washington, D. C; 
London. Established 1907. 

SEND THIS COUPON for a list of new Patriotic Films 
just released . . . and for information on the Peerless 
"Vap-O-rate" Film Treatment. 



BELL & HOWELL COMPANY 

1825 Larchmont Avenue, Chicago. Illinois 

Please send me Supplement 1943-C. 1 have mm. 

projector, sound .... silent .... made by 

I'm interested in buying renting films for 

stimulating morale. . . .educational films Civilian 

Defense films entertainment 

I'd like to know more about the Peerless "Vap-O-rate" 
Film Treatment. 



Name . 



Address 

City State hm 6-43 



TONIGHT.' 



Right in your own home- 
show movies of 



ON AID DUCK 

Acknowledged the most popular animated cartoon 
character, Donald Duck is a riot of fun in each 



of these new films: 






DONALD'S ICE-CAPERS 


No. 


1559 


DONALD SETS DUCKED 


No. 


1540 


SPANISH SERENADE 


No. 


1541 


DOWN MEXICO WAY 


No. 


1543 



100 Ft. 16mm. — S3. 00 ★ 50 Ft. 8mm. — SI. 50 





World's most 
popular animated 
cartoons aval lable 
for home projectors! 



OSWALD 

He's at his best in this special 
series of animated cartoons: 



THE RADIO BUS 
BUZZING AROUND 
GOOFY GOPHER 
REMOTE CONTROL 



No. 16-A 
No. 20-A 
No. 22-A 
No. 23-A 



100 Ft 16mm $3.00 

50 Ft. 8mm. $1.50 



r 



MICKEY MOUSE 

Walt Disney's original cartoon star packs a riotous 
wallop of laughs in each of these four fun films: 

MICKEY'S KONGO KILLER No. 1505-A 

MICKEY'S ROYAL BATTLE No. 151 l-A 

STOP 'EM FLYING No. I5I7-A 

WILD WEST MICKEY No. IS22-A 

100 Ft. 16mm.— S3. 00 ★ 50 Ft. 8mm.— SI. 50 



ORDER FORM 




HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Please ship the following films in size indicated below: 
Remittance Enclosed □ Ship C. O. D. . □ 



Name 
Address 



Zone 

. No. 



Stafe 



Send Free Catalog. 



FILM 
NUMBER 


50 Ft. 
8mm. 

$1-50 


100 Ft. 
14mm. 

S3-00 





















0LLYW00D 

FILM ENTERPRISES 



INC. 



6060 Sunset Boulevard - Hollywood, California 



Victor Motion Picture Equipment 

Quickens the Tempo 

of War Teaching - Training - 
Entertaining 

Victor Equipment is hastening VICTORY on the home 
front and on the far-flung battle fronts of the world. 
Few war tools, if any, are doing such a vital war job. 

When peace returns, look forward to new Victor 
products. All Victor's talent for research, design and 
manufacturing will again produce the finest cameras 
and projectors for you. 

VICTOR ANIMATOGRAPH CORPORATION 

242 W. 55th St., New York • 188 W. Randolph, Chicago • Davenport. Iowa 

Distributors Throughout the World 







JULY 




NUMBER 7 
VOLUME X 




REEL FELLOWS 

A friendly fraternity of 
movie amateurs spon- 
sored by Home Movies 
magazine. Your mem- 
bership is invited. 



ARTHUR E. GAVIN 

EDITOR 



GEORCE W. CUSHMAN 
J. H. SCHOEN 

Associate Editors 



C. E. BELL 

Photographic Editor 



L. C. BUSCHER 

Art Director 




. . nome— 

MOVIES 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Copyrighted 1 943 and published monthly by Ver Halen Publications, 
publishers of Home Movies, National Photographic Dealer, and 
Hollywood Motion Picture Review. No part of contents may be 
reprinted without specific permission. 



CONTENTS FOR JULY, 1943 

THE READER SPEAKS 1. 202 

REVIEWS OF AMATEUR FILMS 204 

substitutes for photofloods — By Curtis Randall. .. 207 

sound for 8 millimeter film.' — By Jack Irwin 208 

movie of the month — By J. H. Schoen 210 

ACCESSORY LENSES YOU CAN MAKE By Lester Dai IS ... 2 1 I 

going to build a titler? — By George W. Cusbman 212 

the human side of filming wild life — By Sam Campbell 213 

WINDBACK AND FRAME'COUNTER FOR KEYSTONE- 8 

— By Harry D. Hamill z 1 4 

how to judge' a movie contest — By W. G. Carleton 215 

THE EXPERIMENTAL CINE WORKSHOP 2l6 

IF YOU WANT A FILM TO SHOW 2l8 

FILTER FACTOR COMPENSATOR CHART 228 

home movie titles — By Edmund Turner 229 

PHOTO CREDITS: Pg. 207, Curtis Randall; 208 and 20?, Louis H. 
Borchert; 211, Curtis Randall; 212, George W. Cushman; 213, Sam 
Campbell; 214, Harry D. Hamill; 215, Chicago Cinema Club. 



CHAS. J. Ver HALEN 

PUBLISHER 



C. J. Ver HALEN, JR. 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 
6060 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif 
Phone CRanite 5149 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

Eyerett Cellert 
62 W. 45th Street 
Vanderbilt 6-5254 



CHICAGO OFFICE 
Henry R. Hazard 
209 So. State St. 
Harrison 2063 



ADVISORY EDITORS 



DR. A. K. BAUMGARDNER 

Peoria Cinema C 



PETER BEZEK 



Chicago Cinema 01 1 



S. JAMES BIALSON 

Amateur Motion Picture Club of St. Lout 



E. MOSS BROWN 



Dallas Cinema Clu 



WALTER BRACKEN 

Til* 8-lt Movie Club, Philadelphia, Pa 

W. EMERSON CLYMA 

Detroit Society of Cinematographer 

RUSSELL A. DIXON 

Pittsburgh Amateur Cinema ClukI 

CYRIL DVORAK 

Suburban Amateur Movie Clu 



ARTHUR E. GIBBS 



RAY A. HOOK 



Portland Cine Clu 



Seattle 8mm. Clu 



ALFRED F. KAUFMAN 

Indianapolis Amateur Movie Clu 



). E. NESTELL 



Cinemen Club 



NARCISSE A. PELLETIER 

Toronto Amateur Movie Club 

GILBERT B. PETERSON 

Metropolitan Cine Club 



A. THEO. ROTH 



Sherman Clay Movie Club 



C. O. ROUNTREE 

Bay Empire 8mm. Movie Club 

J. PAUL SNYDER 

Norfolk Amateur Movie Club 

REED E. SNYDER 

Des Moines Y.M.C.A. Movie Club 



M. F. SISSEL 



Austin Movie Club 



CURTIS O. TALBOT 

Metro Movie Club of Chicago 



Entered as Second-Class Matter, May 6, 1938, at 
the Postoffice at Los Angeles, Calif., under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 

Subscription rates: U. S. $2.50 per year. Single 
copies 25c. Advertising rates on application 



HOLLYWOOD'S MAGAZINE FOR THE MOVIE AMATEUR 



HOME MOVIES FOK JULY 



Om 8K /6m Moms of/ank Victories 



it 



MIS 
SMASHED 



IN AFRICA ? 



See the smashing finale of the Axis in Africa! On 
your own screen show movies of the once proud 
Afrika Korps cracking before Allied fighting fury. 
See historic meetings of Yanks and Britons— of Eisen- 
hower and Montgomery! 

Thrill to joyous scenes of liberated peoples as 
Bizerte and Tunis fall to Allied armies . . . then see amazing 
scenes of a once mighty army driven to total and uncondi- 
tional surrender! 

Here is a thrilling movie you will be proud to show again 
and again! Obtain this movie today! 

FREE/ 



New Castle Films' Catalog, describing movies of every impor- 
tant battle action of World War II. Let this illustrated catalog 
help you start your World War II film library now. Check 
below to receive it! 




ORDER FORM 



8 mm. 


□ 50 feat . . . 


$1.75 


□ 180 feet. . . 


5.50 


16 mm. 


□ 100 feet . . 


2.75 


□ 360 feet . . 


8.75 


□ Sound 350 feet 


17.50 




Send Castle Films' "AXIS SMASHED IN AFRICA!" 
in the size and length indicated. 



Name- 



Address- 



City- 



State- 



FIELD BLDG. 
CHICAGO 



RUSS BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Remittance Enclosed □ ship c. o. d. □ Send Castle Films* FREE War Films Catalog □ 

Opr. 1943. C*stle Films. Inc. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




The Reader 



CRAFTSMEN 



one d&Uuf, 



The production line of "GOERZ 
AMERICAN" is formed by skilled 
men, who through painstaking work 
create high-grade photo-lenses and opti- 
cal units for military instruments used by 
our armed forces 

on Land — 

on the Sea — 

in the Air — 

These precise optical units are of the 
greatest importance to our armed 
forces, for without accurate military 
instruments for sighting, fire control and 
photographic aerial reconnaissance their 
fighting machinery would be of little 
value to them. 

aptical science together with our 
craftsmen, doing their duty on the 
job in the production line, will hasten 
victory. 

aur production is keyed to fill the re- 
quirements of our Government. With- 
in limitations we may still be able to 
supply "GOERZ AMERICAN" lenses of 
certain types and sizes for civilian use. 
We suggest yeur inquiries. 

Addrett 

Dept. HM-7 



C. P. GOERZ AMERICAN OPTICAL CO. 



Office and Factory 



317 East 34th Street 
* 



New York 16, N. Y. 



ff 



PRECISION OPTICS 

{ 4A*tce fS99 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★•A- 




Plaudits For Films 

Sirs: In the March issue of Home 
Movies you featured an article entitled 
"Shooting the Colorado Rapids" by 
Frederick Foster and, as you will re- 
call, this article told the story of the 
film "Facing Your Danger" taken by 
Mr. E. E. Olsen of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

This article was of particular interest 
to our Club for it happens that one of 
our members, Mr. Don Olsen, is a 
brother of Mr. E. E. Olsen of Pitts- 
burgh. Our Mr. Don Olsen assured us, 
some weeks in advance, that he hoped 
to obtain this film from his brother for 
showing at our Club. This he was able 
to do, and at our regular meeting on 
April 28th "Facing Your Danger" was 
shown. 

Frankly there were some of us who 
Lad wondered if the picture could act- 
ually be as good as Mr. Foster said it 
was. Now we know — and it is — and 
then some. 

From the standpoint of a most thrill- 
ing adventure film, we believe this un- 
doubtedly is one of the best we have 
ever been privileged to see. Every one 
present was overwhelmed with the 
beauty of the spectacular scenes taken 
in Kodachrome. Also, might tell you 
our Vice-President, Mr. John Lott, tried 
Lis hand at making a special scoring of 
music for the film, and the results of his 
efforts were most pleasing. 

We made quite an occasion of this 
showing, and invited members of the 
Kansas City Camera Club and the Heart 
of America Hobby Association to meet 
with us at this time, and although our 
Club has been enjoying considerable 
success this year, we climaxed previous 
meetings with our largest turnout, and 
the response of our guests was most en- 
thusiastic. 

We would heartily recommend "Fac- 
ing Your Danger" to anyone, and hope 
your Magazine continues to keep us 
posted as to the future success of this 
picture.— Mrs. W. f. Staples, K. C, 
Am. Makers, Kansas City, Mo. 

Logical Choice 

Sirs: In our recent club contest, Mr. 
Sol Stoller won first prize in the i6mm. 
division with his film, "Winner Take 
All," and Mr. Jesse Geisler won first 
prize in the 8mm. division with his Ko- 
dachrome picture, "Made In Heaven." 

Here is a pat on the back for your 
magazine: The prizes awarded to both 



SPEAKS 



contestants was a year's subscription to 
any photographic magazine. Without 
hesitation, Mr. Stoller and Mr. Geisler 
selected Home Movies. Enclosed you 
will find our check in payment of both 
subscriptions. — Sylvia Weledniger, 
Secy., Parkchester Cine Club, Bronx, 
New York. 

Sky's the Limit 

Gentlemen: This is directed at those 
movie amateurs who, for some reason, 
think that all movie making opportuni- 
ties are denied them because of the war 
and it's cramp on auto travel. Evidently 
they've overlooked good old reliable 
shank's mare and the street car as means 
of transportation. 

I know some will answer that you 
can't walk or take a street car to the 
beach or the mountains. But must we 
leave the city and go to the beach or 
to the mountains to make movies? In 
nine cases out of ten, visitors see more 
of a city than the natives. Usually the 
movie maker visiting your city or mine 
v.ill find plenty of interesting material 
tc film with his camera and will go 
home with some highly interesting shots 
u>lled up in his camera. 

What's wrong with those who live 
there? It's their city and it represents 
a part of every citizen more intrinsic 
than any trip made away from home. So 
why not film it? I did mine — and our 
friends are more interested in seeing our 
"Wilmington" reel than the reels we 
have of far off places. It brings into fo- 
cus topics they all recognize and can 
comment upon. 

Think for a minute about your local 
high spots of scenery: your parks, your 
downtown districts, your slums, your 
own street — are they so unphotogenic 
as to be unworthy of treatment? All 
ycu need do, filmer, is walk with your 
crmera in your hand and you will sure- 
ly find a tree or garden you would like 
to see again. So film it and share your 
pieasure with those who may have 
• Continued on Page 22% 



CORRECTION 

• In the June issue, credit for illustra- 
tions for the .article, "Your Projector — 
how to lengthen its lifeline," was erro- 
neously credited to the author, Wm. ]. 
Gatti. The illustrations were from the 
drawing board of Jules Wery, artist and 
illustrator. 



5j1 



: Pip 



For the duration, Revere 
craftsmen are concentrating all 
of their effort on the produc- 
tion of precision-built aircraft 
instruments and other war sup- 
plies. It is therefore especially 
important that those who do 
have cameras and projectors 
share their pleasure with others. 
If you do not have a camera, 
see your photographic dealer 
about renting one. 



§t=>, 



ft* 



mi 



Service men agree motion 
pictures of activities back 
home are the grandest gift 
their friends can send them. If you own a movie 
camera, why not make a picture this week-end 
for someone from your home town who is away 
in a training camp? Revere Camera Company, 
Chicago, Illinois. 




Revere $ 



BUY 
WAR BONDS 




PAGE 204 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



FOR YOUR CAMERA 
OR ACCESSORIES / 



If you have a camera or photo 
equipment in good condition 
and you want to sell, BRING 
IT OR SEND IT TO WIL- 
LOUGHBYS. We will pay 
cash for it. We are particular- 
ly interested in the following: 



Bantam Special 

Contax 

Leica 

Rolleiflex 

Rolleicord 

Speed Graphic 

Korelle Reflex 

Graflex 

V. P. Exakta 

Kine Exakra 

Voigtlander 
Superb 



Super Ikonta 

A-B-C 
Zeiss Ideal 
Revere 
Avus 
Recomar 
Maximar 
Bergheil 
Filmo 

Cine Kodak 
Keystone 



Fill out and mail this coupon 
and we'll tell you approxi- 
mately what we will pay for it. 



MAIL THIS COUPON 

Willoughbys. 110 West 32d Street. New York 
I have for outright sale: 



Name of Camera 

Lens and Shutter 

Condition 

Model Year 

Accessories 

Make me your best offer. 

Name 

Address H.M. 




32nd St., near 6th Ave., N.Y.C. 

World's Largest Camera Store 
Built on Square Dealing 

Established 1898 



REVIEWS... 



of cAmateur film* 



B y 



J . 



H 



S C H O E N 



U A GREAT DAY" is a 400-foot 
8mm. Kodachrome picture produced 
by Alex. W. Morgan, a one-time Movie 
of the Month winner of Toledo, Ohio. 
We recognize in the continuity of this 
film the suggestions on circus filming 
which appeared in an earlier issue of 
Home Movies. 

The picture tells the story of a lad 
who awakens early on the morning the 
circus comes to town, works with the 
labor gang to earn passes. The story is 
told in retrospect as 
the lad, victim of 
too many hot dogs, 
too much pink lem- 
onade, cracker jack, 
etc., arrives home af- 
ter an excitable day 
at the circus grounds. 
He falls asleep in a 
chair and dreams of 
the day's experi- 
ences. 

The huge circus 
train is shown arriv- 
ing in the mists of 
early morning. Al- 
ready townspeople 
are clustered about 
the tracks to watch 
the preliminary show 
— unloading the an- 
imals, parade wagons, equipment, etc. 
The camera follows all activities — 
seems to be everywhere at once — re- 
cording unloading operations, stake 
driving, tent erection, feeding the crew, 
etc. The parade is shown, then the big 
shew. The boy is frequently pictured — 
eating, or drinking or munching pea- 
nuts. In the closing sequence, the cam- 
era returns to the lad asleep in the chair 
.is he awakens from his dream. 

Filmer Morgan reports much of the 
footage was obtained over a period of 
the past five years. Only after reading 
the circus ideas offered in Home Mov- 
ies did he realize the possibilities of ed- 
iiing his circus scenes into a tight con- 
tinuity, and he made it a point to shoot 
additional scenes to complete the con- 
tinuity when the circus again came to 
town last Summer. 

The photography as a whole is a splen- 
did job. Editing and titling is commend- 
able except for two things: flop-over 



if EVERY filmer of amateur movies, 
whether a subscriber or not, is invited 
to submit his films to the editors for 
review and helpful criticism. This free 
service applies to any type of picture 
whether it be your first movie or a 
pretentious photoplay effort. Aim of 
this service is to help you make better 
pictures. 



Reviewed films will be rated I, 2 
and 3 stars. Those rating 2 or 3 stars 
will receive Free an animated leader 
indicative of its merit. Best film re- 
viewed each month will receive a spe- 
cial certificate award as the Movie 
of the Month. 



effects are used in introducing every 
sub-title. Trick effects are o.k. used 
ence or twice in main, credit or other 
introductory titles; but they should 
never be continued in the subtitles for 
the simple reason they consume too 
niuch footage, slow down the action 
?nd become tiresome. Other criticism 
n that descriptive titles start out in 
the words of an unseen narrator, then 
suddenly switch to titles spoken by the 
boy. All of the sub-titles from begin- 
ning to end should 
have been in the 
words of either the 
unseen narrator or 
the boy. The make- 
up and photography 
of the titles, how- 
ever, otherwise is a 
professional-like job. 

Home Movies 
awarded the film a 
3 -star merit leader. 



All films are returned promptly by 
insured express together with merit 
leaders and special analysis report. 



"A VICTORY 
Garden or Where's 
the Sloan's Lini- 
ment" is title of a 
clever 100 ft. Koda- 
chrome picture 
filmed by Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Holbrook 
of Los Angeles, producers of the April 
Movie of the Month. Opening scene 
shows a woman Victory gardener on 
the lawn of her home sorting packages 
cf vegetable seeds. Getting out her gar- 
dening tools she digs up her flower bed 
?nd prepares it for vegetable seeds. 

After seeds have been sown, she ap- 
plies liquid vitamin B i, not in the 
minute quantity recommended, but a 
half a bottle of it in a bucketful of 
water! Result, seeds magically germi- 
nate and grow to full-size vegetables 
over night. When gardener sees this 
miraculous result she gets an idea. "Why 
not try some of this stuff, myself?" she 
asks. And she does — drinks remainder 
of the bottle of B-i. Closing scene 
shows her suddenly rejuvenated by the 
Vitamin extract romping about the yard 
like a playful child. 

While this film is not marked by the 
smooth action and continuity of the 

• Continued on Page 227 



FOR JULY 



PACE 205 






BHHI^M^MHHHMfllMMinSHHHMHMHHHHMl 

■■ ■. :■ ■ ' ■' ' ■ ■■ ■ - ■ 

OFFICIAL U. S. ARMY AIR CORPS PHOTO 

Portable photographic labora- 
tory. In time of battie, U. S. 
Army planes take pictures, de- 
velop them in the plane, and 
then drop them over a field 
headquarters, for the 



• A««'.* e ,Ts » U P OP fine ^fotteos* 

products n 



■ - x - * 

jp them over a field 
headquarters, for the |k 
use of the command- 
ing officer. In World 
War I, it would be 
many hours before 
generals got photos 
they wanted of 
enemy territory. 






ROCHESTER, U. S. A. 



• not 206 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




BIC CUNS DONT POOL 




When you're out to smash a tank concentration ten miles 
away, you don't hope to hit your target by merely pointing. 

You measure the wind, calculate speed, observe again, correct 
your elevation. You make sure, by means of precision instruments, 
without which no long-distance weapons can be fully effective. 

Without such precision, without instruments that make sure, 
no war like this one could be fought; no modern battles could 
be won. 

And by far the most widely used of all precision instruments 
m all operations are binoculars. 

Universal alone now makes more binoculars for the Army, 
Navy and Marines, and the United Nations, than were manufac- 
tured by the entire industry before the war. 

All this means quantity production hitherto thought impos- 
sible in instruments of such high precision — much of it made 
possible by Universal engineering research. 

Today, as a result, outstanding accuracy in lens-making is 
achieved more easily and economically than ever before, any- 
where in the world. 

From this experience, Universal looks forward to a new im- 
petus in the development of photographic and optical instru- 
ments— invites you to look forward to finer-than-ever cameras, 
not as the hard-Sought luxury of the few, but as precious posses- 
sions available to everyone. 




A soldier with strained eyes 
is a wounded man 

Here are metal parts being finished for 
perfect alignment on special machinery 
designed by the Universal Camera Cor- 
poration. Practic al!) no tolerance is per- 
mitted, lor il each eye is (breed to focus 
independently, there is strain. And 
strained eyes can incapacitate a soldier 
as surely as a bullet w ound ...Today's ad- 
vances in precision promise finer optical 
and photographic equipment tomorrow. 




1 here's only one JliifC 
lee're promler of! 



1/ni verbal Camera Edrpdratidn 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



Makers of Precision Photographic and Optical Instruments • Peacetime Manufacturers of Cinemaster, Mercury, Corsair Cameras 




HOME MOVIES 

Published in Hollywood 
JULY 1943 



• Excellent substitute for the No. I photo- 
flood is this G-E T-20 projection lamp. It is 
rated at 13,000 lumens, has a life of 50 hours. 
It must be burned base down. 



SUBSTITUTES 



FOR 




0T0FL00DS 



By CURTIS RANDALL 



L 



LF inability to buy photoflood 
lamps has further restricted your movie 
making activities, you can take heart 
in the news that there are still available 
several non-photographic lamps of con- 
siderable candle power which serve as 
c:-.cellent substitutes. 

When Uncle Sam placed photofloods 
under priorities, it was not to restrict 
the amateur in his hobby but to release 
materials and manpower for more es- 
sential work and to make available an 
undiminished supply of photofloods for 
war-time use of our armed forces and 
the industries serving them. Under the 
circumstances, none of us begrudge 
them the lamps, and we stand ready, 
when necessary, to forego the substi- 
tutes should the situation ever de- 
mand. 

Happily for the still active movie 
maker, there are efficient substitute 
lamps available. They are not to be 
had, except in rare instances, from 
camera stores or photo dealers, but 
from wholesale lamp or electrical sup- 
ply houses. 

Pictured at the right are the four 
most practical photoflood substitutes. 
In most cases, they are approximate in 
candlepower to photofloods and vary 
only in Kelvin rating or color tempera- 
ture degrees — but not enough to seri- 
ously affect results of black and white 
movies filmed with such lamps. 



One of the lamps must be burned 
base down which makes it impracti- 
cal for use with ordinary reflectors — 
and all of these lamps must be used in 
reflectors in order to utilize the maxi- 
mum light output of each. However, 
reflectors are marketed in which the 
Limp receptacle is mounted for vertical 
burning of lights and, of course, where 
these are unavailable, it is a simple mat- 
ter to rig up suitable reflectors of metal 
wash basins, as many of us did in the 
early days of amateur movies when spun 
aluminum reflectors had not yet become 
plentiful — and low-priced. 

Before comparing the four lamps il- 
lustrated here, which are available as 
photoflood substitutes, let us consider 
the qualities and limitations of the pho- 
tofloods they are to replace. The No. i 
photoflood consumes 250 watts, has a 
rated life of 3 hours. Rated lumens at 
115 volts is 8650 and the mean color 
temperature is 3400 0 Kelvin. The lu- 
men rating of a lamp denotes the act- 
ual volume of light output. The color 
temperature is indicated in Kelvin (K) 
degrees and determines a lamp's adapt- 

• Continued on Page 22} 



• Familiar to all is this ordinary house light- 
ing bulb of 300 watts. It may be burned in 
any position and has a rated life of 750 hours. 
It rates 50 watts above the No. I Photoflood. 




• Another substitute for photoflood No. I 
is this G-E G-30 spotlight bulb. It's rated at 
8000 lumens and has a burning life of 200 
hours at 115 volts. It may be burned in any 
position. 




• Applicable as a spot or floodlight is 
G-E's R-40 reflector-flood lamp with lens-like 
surface that concentrates it's 300 watts in a 
beam to produce candlepower of approxi- 
mately 3000 at 10 feet. 



207 





— on 8 millimeter 



By | A C K 

is lima sound-on-film just around 
the corner? Is it practicable? Is it one 
of the post-war surprises in store for 
the movie amateur? These questions 
soon are to be answered by amateur 
experimenters as well as professional en- 
gineers who. for some time, have been 
ouietly engaged in research and applica- 
tion of sound tracks on the narrowest 
of home movie films. 

One man — a deep-dyed movie ama- 
teur, incidentally — apparently already 



IRWIN 



has arrived at the answer. He not only 
declares 8mm. sound films are possible. 
He has produced them — and all of the 
equipment necessary to their produc- 
tion. He is Louis H. Borchert of Ridge- 
ly, ^~est Virginia, instrument engineer 
for the Celanese Corporation of Amer- 
ica's Cumberland. Maryland plant. 

Borchert holds with the nation's fore- 
most industrial designers and engineers 
that streamlined television-sound-on- 
fi!m combinations for homes is a certain 



major post-war development in the field 
cf home entertainment, and destined 
to become a dominant industry as was 
the development and production of ra- 
cios and radio-phonograph combinations 
before the war. 

Borchert envisions handsome cabinets 
o! modern design in the living rooms 
of homes of the future that will pro- 
ject, on built-in wall screens, either 
scund films or television programs at 
the casual snap of a switch. A ten-inch 
reel or "cartridge" of 8mm. sound film 
would provide a full hour's movie en- 
tertainment with no more effort than in- 
volved in playing a phonograph record. 

As with most experimenters. Bor- 
chert's equipment for producing sound 
tiacks on 8mm. film is somewhat crude, 
involving parts of discarded home mov- 
ie projectors, odd lenses and gears, etc. 
borchert refers to his equipment as "tin 
can" but, according to him, it turns 
out 8 mm. sound tracks of reasonably 
good quality. Of course, there is still 
much room for improvement, a mat- 
ter of rebuilding the apparatus with 
parts made especially for it instead of 
'.he odds and ends which now make up 
hi; equipment. As Borchert puts it, " . . . 
My present 8mm. sound tracks are 
equally good as those produced during 



film I 



early day experiments with i6mm. 
film." In a nutshell. Borchert's experi- 
ments to date definitely prove that 
Smm. sound films are feasible, which 
is the word all movie amateurs have 
been anxiously awaiting. 

'VTith Smm. projectors outnumbering 
sixteens almost four to one, and with 
the amateur's current interest definite- 
ly pointing to a desire if not a demand 
for sound in some form, the market for 
Smm. sound films and sound equipment 
is a foregone conclusion. It waits only 
for the cessation of war that will per- 
mit manufacturers to re-tool their 
{.lants for production of sound projec- 
tors and possibly sound heads and con- 
version kits that would enable present 
cwners of Smm. equipment to convert 



their projectors for screening of sound 
films. 

All of Borchert's experiments have 
been restricted to reducing 35 mm. and 
1 6mm. sound films to 8mm. As yet he 
hti built no primary recording equip- 
ment for the purpose of shooting 8mm. 
films in sound. But with the practica- 
bility of sound tracks on 8mm. estab- 
lished, it is only a step further to de- 
velopment of field recording equipment. 

Both wide area and variable area 
sound tracks have successfully been re- 
duced from 1 6mm. to 8mm. film by 
Borchert and some idea of his thorough- 
ness may be had from the fact he built 
.1 step-printer as well as a continuous 
printer in order to definitely establish 
vhich method of printing 8mm. sound 
films would net maximum results. These 
printers are illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. 

Figure 5 shows Borchert's optical 
step printer which reduces and prints 
the 1 6mm. picture and sound track im- 
age on 8mm. film one frame at a time. 
As may be seen, Borchert utilized parts, 
gears and lenses from a wide array of 
instruments, machines and gadgets in 
order to construct this printer. But his 
engineering and technical knowledge 
enabled him to do this with utmost 
success. 

Figure 6 pictures the continuous 
printer, and most movie makers will 
recognize the old Model C Kodascope 
?nd the Univex camera which went to- 
gether to form this masterful piece of 
sound reduction equipment. 

The reproducing unit — projector and 
amplifier — are pictured in Fig. 3. Bor- 
chert designed a special sound head, 
along lines diagramed in Fig. 4, 2nd 
mounted it on an 8mm. Keystone pro- 



Fig. 3 

jector, converting it to sound. 
The amplifier, also shown in 
Fig. 3, was linked with the 
sound head. This contains all 
controls by which volume and 
modulation of sound is regu- 
lated. 

The sound track occupies some 
of the picture area on the film, 
as with 35mm. and 16mm. sound 
films and the picture becomes 
almost square in format. The 
height of the picture remains 
the same as with silent 8mm. 
film. 

Some of the "bugs" still to 
be licked arise from the slower 
rate of travel of 8mm. film com- 
pared to 1 6mm. and 35mm. Be- 
fore 1 6mm. sound on film was 
successfully developed, it was 
believed that the slower rate of 
travel of the smaller film past 
• Continue J on Page 228 



• Fig 1 (at top) shows Keystone 
8mm. ,jrojector converted to so'jnd. 
Fig. 4 — diagram showing con- 
struction and installation of sound 
head on Keystore 8mm. projector. 

Figs. 5 and 6 home-made step 

printer and continuous printer re- 
spectively <vith which Louis Bor- 
chert reduced 14mm. sound films 
to 8mrr. 



SOUND OBUM 
WITH P. L CELL 




w»se 



tic 



Fig 



MOVIE of 



What s You 



FAVORITE 
HOLIDAY? 





the MOITH 



w 

1 1 HEN Reel Fellow Roy Crev- 
eling of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, was 
summoned for service by Uncle Sam, he 
was in the midst of his final home movie 
production for the duration. However, 
instead of shelving the project, he left 
everything handy for that opportunity 
to finish it that came to him much ear- 
lier than expected. Happily, after six 
months of service, he obtained a trans- 
fer to an East Coast photo center of 
the Signal Corps. 

This enabled Creveling to spend his 
f urloughs at home, during which time 
he filmed additional sequences for his 
picture, then edited, titled and com- 
pleted it. Eventually, of course, he sent 
on the film to Home Movies for re- 
view and the editors have elected it the 
Movie of the Month for July. Shot en- 
tirely on 1 6mm. panchromatic film, the 
picture is 375 feet in length. 

Aptly titled "What's Your Favorite 
Holiday," it portrays, with more than 
ordinary interest, the homey, familiar 
activities of people in an average city 
celebrating the principle holidays of 
America from Easter to New Year's 
eve. The picture opens logically on East- 
er morn with a long shot of a church 
steeple in which a bell is lazily tolling, 
summoning citizens to prayer. There's 
a montage of shots showing apple trees 
in bloom terminating in a beautiful close- 
up of a cluster of blossoms. The cam- 
era then takes us downtown where the 
customary Easter Parade is in progress. 
The people have turned out in their 
Easter attire to promenade in the warm 
sunshine of a typical spring day. 

A spinning title suddenly halts to an- 
nounce the next sequence — Memorial 
Day. This sequence begins with a shot 
of a flag flying at half mast. There are 
parades; flower bedecked graves in the 
cemetery; gun salutes; and citizens 
placing wreaths on monument of the 
Unknown Soldier. 

Another spinning title introduces the 
Independence Day sequence. There's a 
shot of Independence Hall, the Liberty 
Bell and of people listening to band 
concerts. There are scenes of the 4th of 
July parade, masterfully done. Then the 
night fireworks display was filmed — on 
super-speed pan film — providing one of 




• On this page are frame enlargements from 
"What's Your Favorite Holiday," Movie of 
the Month depicting the homey, familiar ac- 
tivities of people celebrating America's prin- 
ciple holidays: 2 — The Easter Parade at At- 
lantic City; 3 — Memorial Day services in a 
national cemetery; A — Fireworks on Fourth of 
July; 5 — A last fling at summer on the rides 
in an amusement park; 6 — The youngsters 
keep one eye on the turkey while Dad leads in 
a Thanksgiving prayer; 7 — Kris Kringle in a 
department store window laughs merrily at 
shoppers crowding the window outside; and 
8 — the joyous midnight celebration New 
Years Eve. 



the best records of fireworks ever to 
be captured on 16mm. film. 

The next sequence covers Labor Day 
r.nd this was introduced with another 
• Continued on Page 222 



210 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




• It is possible for the cinebug 
to buy an assortment of lenses at 
low cost which will enable him to 
extend the latitude of photo- 
graphic possibilities with his titler. 




ACCESSORY LEISES 
VIII CM MAKE.... 



o 



' NE of the pleasant experiences 
encountered in my amateur movies hob- 
by was the discovery of the effect pro- 
duced by various lenses when applied to 
photography, editing and projection of 
motion pictures. In addition to the re- 
sults obtained by placing a single auxili- 
ary lens before my camera, I also found 
that certain lenses, properly mounted 
in front of my camera lens, would en- 
able me to make telephoto shots ; that a 
similar arrangement fitted to the lens 
of my projector would permit me to 
screen larger pictures without moving 
the projector back from the screen. 

These discoveries came about after I 
purchased a set of experimental lenses 
tor the nominal sum of $1.60. The set 
i-icluded 15 lenses of various diameters 
and focal lengths and a 12 -page booklet 
describing how one could utilize the 
lenses in constructing telescopes, tele- 
photo lenses, film viewing devices, etc. 
The whole kit is assembled especially for 
photographic experimenters and cine- 
bugs and is distributed by the Edmund 
Salvage Co., Audubon, New Jersey. 

Some application of these lenses to 
cine gadgeteering is illustrated in the 
diagrams on this page. For instance I 
mounted one lens with a focal length of 
152 millimeters (6 inches) in a paste- 
board tube of the same diameter as my 
camera lens and utilized it as an auxili- 
ary lens in shooting titles. The lens 
was cemented inside the paper tube 
with plastic wood which I found to be 
most reliable for this purpose. 

211 



Paper tubes are an important adjunct 
in utilizing these lenses for photograph- 
ic purposes. They furnish the base or 
mounting for the lenses instead of met- 
al tubing now restricted for defense. 
Usually, a wide assortment of sizes will 
be needed because of the many differ- 
ent sizes of lenses in the kit. Mailing 
tubes, paper towel cores, etc., are a 
ready source for the tubes required. 
Where a tube of proper diameter is 
not available, I often slit a larger tube 
lengthwise, reduce it to required size, 
then seal the seam again with scotch 
tape. 

I constructed a telephoto lens, as 
shown in diagram, utilizing two sec- 
tions of paper tubing telescoped, and a 
92mm. and 50mm. lens — the latter 
mounted in a circular collar made of 
wood. Lenses were cemented in place 
with plastic wood, as before. By stop- 
• Continued on Page 227 



• Diagrams illustrate a few op- 
tical cine accessories which any 
movie amateur may construct with 
paper tubes and one or more in- 
expensive lens elements. 




AUXILIARY LENS 



TITLING LENS 




PAPER TUBE 



TELEPHOTO 



LENS 



CEMENT 



FILM 



\ * 








- NAILS — 





FILM VIEWER 



WIDE ANGLE 
PROJECTION 
LENS 






• Fig. I — This home made titler provides ti- 
tles up to 12 by 14 inches, makes zoom, flop- 
over, and other effects. 



• Fig. 2 — Same titler showing camera mount- 
ed back for 12 by 16 inch title. 



• Fig. 3 — Another view of titler looking 
through title card holder toward camera. 



GOING TO BUILD A TITLER? 



By CEORCE 

Invariably the hobbyist who 

builds something for the first time, ulti- 
mately discovers a dozen mistakes he 
made or perhaps many things he would 
do differently were he to do the job 
over again. This is true of building a 
titler as anything else, as those who have 
built titlers know. 

So let us review here some of the 
things we would improve upon or the 
innovations we would add when build- 
ing our next titler. Specifications and 
dimensions will be omitted in view of 
the wide divergence in the average am- 
ateur's titling requirements. Some want 
a small compact "typewriter" titler, 
whereas others demand a larger layout 
permitting use of 9 by 12 inch title 
cards or larger. In either case, the inno- 
vations we shall dwell upon are appli- 
cable in principle. 

Consider that a titler is intended to 
facilitate photography of relatively 
small printed or lettered areas. The 
slightest vibration or movement of 
camera or titler during filming of title 
will be highly magnified when title is 
projected on the screen. One of our 
first considerations, then, is good, solid 
construction, utilizing braces, shelf 

• Fig. 4 — The flop-over device is quickly 
mounted on frame of title card holder. Cam- 
era films 1st title which is then flopped over 
to reveal another title on other side of card. 



W. CUSHMAN 



supports, etc., where they will add 
strength. Solid construction doesn't rule 
cut building a small, compact type- 
writer titler. The framework and con- 
struction of the small as well as the 
large titler should be rigid enough to 
permit camera to be operated without 
vibrating the floodlights or title easel. 

Next should be considered all the 
types of titling expected of the titler, 
then design the titler to accomplish 
them. If we expect to use rear projec- 
tion of backgrounds occasionally, pro- 
vision must be made for a removable 
title board interchangeable with a frame 
that will hold a panel of opal glass. 
In the titler illustrated at top of page, 
a grooved frame is provided that takes 
a 12 by 16 inch title board or panels 
of clear or opal glass. There are three 
grooves in the frame so that a "multi- 
plane" title may be photographed con- 
sisting of a picture background on the 
title board, an ornamental design paint- 
ed on the middle panel of clear glass, 
and the title text lettered on the front 
panel of glass, producing a third-dimen- 
sional effect. This, of course, for main 
titles only. 

Occasionally, will we want to make 

• Fig 5 — Showing device for making flop- 
around titles. Eighth-inch rod bent to shape 
extends through holes or clips in title card 
frame. Effects are used mostly in credit fitles. 



flop-over or flop-around titles? Then 
we should provide a means for mount- 
ing title on a shaft fitted with a crank 
that will move the title smoothly in the 
desired action during filming. This fea- 
ture is also illustrated in photos at bot- 
tom of page. 

Means for making scroll titles is al- 
most a necessity, as often a title must 
be longer than the space in a single title 
card area allows. Therefore, title text 
must be lettered on a long card or pa- 
aper strip and moved slowly from bot- 
tom to top in the titler. A popular 
method of doing this is to use a cylinder 
— a tin can or rolled oats carton — and 
fit it with a shaft through the center 
and a crank at one end. This is centered 
in the title card holder. Small metal 
clips at either side of the frame hold the 
shaft so that cylinder is perfectly cen- 
tered. Title is cemented around the 
cylinder which is slowly rotated as the 
camera photographs the text. Cylinder 
and shaft, of course, are quickly de- 
mountable. 

Zoom shots are another innovation 
applicable to titles with great effective- 
ness. To produce a zoom shot, the cam- 
era is suddenly pushed forward toward 
title card, to photograph the title in a 
rapidly growing readible image. This 
can be accomplished by building a track 
cn base of titler and fitting to it a suit- 
able camera support that can be moved 
• Continued on Page 224 




212 




• Sam Campbell, his Cine Special set to 
record the scene, coaxes his subjects into the 
open with tood. A few seconds later, Camp- 
bell had a rare scene of these bears and their 
eating antics safely recorded on film. 



T, 



HE story of the lady and her 
aandelions is a classic of wit and wisdom 
to every nature enthusiast. It seems that 
she had an overabundance of trouble 
with the pesky little yellow blossoms 
monopolizing her lawn. Finally in des- 
peration she wrote to a state department 
official asking how she might get rid 
of them, "For," she insisted, "I have 
tried everything!" "Then, my dear 
lady," read the laconic reply, "you will 
have to learn to love them!" 

In those words the naturalist sees a 
criterion for all human approach to na- 
ture. There is nothing he can do about 
it. He cannot take anything from it, 
i-or add anything to it, nor in the largest 
sense can he alter it — he must learn to 
love it as it is! 

Certainly this is fundamental in wild 
Lfe photography. One is ill-equipped 
indeed to obtain those pictures which 
have that extra interest and charm to 
them, if he has not learned first to love 
the creatures he seeks for his films. Such 
love is more than just animal sentiment- 
alism. It is proper appraisal of the un- 
fathomed miracle of life as expressed in 
the animal kingdom. It is appreciation 
cf the intelligence present in each ani- 
mal, that he may meet his environment 
successfully, solve his problems, estab- 
lish his routine, and live within the laws 
r.nd conventions of his species. 

While one might obtain pictures of 
animals without this love in his heart, 
might catch a scene or two even with 
fear and the hatred that comes from 
fear governing his thought, still he 
v» ould never make pictures with real 
value, those that depict the character 
of the creature and the immeasurable 
mystery which cloaks all nature. This 
may seem a strange place to begin the 
subject, but nevertheless that is where 




Vke k 



uman 



ming, 



Hae of 

WILD LIFE 



M CAM 

"The Philosopher of the Forest" 



wild life photography does begin: with 
the love of the creature rather than the 
camera! 

It was more good fortune than good 
choice that made me put first things 
first in this field. As a devout natural- 
ist, I have lived most of my live in the 
forests, particularly northern Wiscon- 
sin, Michigan, Minnesota, and Canada. 
My home, The Sanctuary of Wegimind, 




• Raccoons, coaxed into 
floodlit camera range by 
morsels of food spread out 
on Campbell's cabin door- 
step, become interesting sub- 
jects for his movie camera. 
Inherent natural friendliness 
and love of animals are 
prime requisites for success- 
ful filming of wildlife, ac- 
cording to Sa mCampbell. 



near the tiny town of Three Lakes, 
Wisconsin, is in a wild life refuge. Here 
most of the animals native to these 
north woods are found in some abund- 
ance. Here I learned a fact that every 
nature lover knows — that animals are 
not generally dangerous to human be- 
ings, and in fact are inclined to be rath- 
ei friendly if given freedom from hu- 
man abuse. Thus the love of living 
creatures had been awakened within me 
Lefore a camera was in my hands. I took 
up motion picture photography with 
r.ither a selfish sense, endeavoring to 
gather up and preserve the precious ex- 
periences which were unfolding to me 
in the forest constantly. But my pic- 
tures were made primarily for my own 
records, and I had not the slightest no- 
tion of using them publicly. 

Then a simple little chipmunk awak- 
ened me to the importance of the films 
I was accumulating. He was a funny 
little fellow. We called him Stubby, 
though he can be more accurately iden- 
• Continued on Page 225 

213 




• Fig. I — showing position of frame counter 
< nd windback shaft. Film is turned back by 
inserting key in shaft and winding back for ex- 
tent of the fadeout. The mechanical fader, 
for which mounting plate is shown, is not 
described. 



As may be observed in photo at left, 
my cine camera is one of the early 
model 8mm. Keystones with the release 
button on the right hand side instead 
of the front. Moreover, it has a film 
holding claw in the film gate which I 
understand is lacking in the later mod- 
els. However, this feature in no way in- 
terferes with movement of film through 
the gate in the backwinding operation. 

Installation of windback and the 
lrame counter will be described separ- 
ately. The first step was to remove the 
motor chassis from the camera case. The 



Windback and frame' 
counter for r\eg£tone~8 



B y 



HARRY 



1 



LLMOST every movie amateur 
will agree that all cine cameras have 
been thoroughly tested and many found 
wanting in two particulars: (i) a sim- 
ple and dependable windback and, (2) 
a reliable frame counter. Exploring am- 
ateurs have applied their inventive ge- 
nius in devising windbacks and frame 
counters for almost every make and 
model of 8mm. and 16mm. cameras and 
many of these have been illustrated and 
described in previous issues of Home 
Movies. 

However, I do not recall ever reading 
a description of such gadgets for the 
early model 8mm. Keystone camera of 
which there are a great many in use 
today. So, having improved my Key- 
stone eight with a windback and frame 
counter and having proved them satis- 
factory in every respect, their construc- 
tion and installation details are offered 
here for the benefit of fellow Keystone 
eighters. 



H A M I L L 



small screws on the film gate should 
not be removed until the whole chassis 
has been taken from the camera case. I 
found that the ring-shaped lens seat 
that extends through front of case will 
pass the case easily after all screws have 
bten removed from front, back and 
sides of the camera and after winding 
key and viewfinder is removed. A knife 




BRASS GEAR Oil 
SPRING CASE 



' blade was used to spring the camera case 
sufficiently to allow passage of the lens 
mount free of the case. 

I suggest following this method on 
this particular camera for two import- 
ant reasons: (1) It is unnecessary to 
tamper with film gate. If, for instance, 
the two screws in the gate are loosened, 
the gate will slide up or down approxi- 
mately 1/16 of an inch. Unless the or- 
iginal position is accurately marked and 
the gate later returned to this position 
and locked, the frame lines of future 
pictures filmed with the camera will not 
tally with those made before the camera 
was dismantled. (2) It is possible to see 
exact position of shutter with relation 
to film aperture when camera is stopped. 

I made a careful note of this on pa- 
per as a guide to follow in returning 
camera mechanism to the case later so 
that the pull down claw would be in 
the proper position. 

In constructing the windback fea- 
ture, I first allowed camera motor to run 
down completely. Thm the screws hold- 
ing the two sides of the motor chassis 
were removed. Upon removing the 
plate on the winding-key side of chassis, 
I observed a large fiber gear. This is the 
gear that meshes with the windback 
gear to be added. 

The windback assembly is shown at 
E in Fig. 2. I used a fiber gear contain- 
ing 46 teeth of the same pitch as the 
fiber camera gear. The shaft D, Fig. 2, 
was turned from a part of an old wind- 
• Continued on Page 220 



Punch used to look 
bushing to camera frame 



Solder 
Windback bushing 




Pin 




GEAR SHAFT 



214 



• Fig 2 — Diagrams show how parts 
for windback and frame counter were 
constructed and assembled by author 
Hamill. 




FRAME COUNTER 
WINDOW 




-Gear Shaft 

-1/64" ebim 

-46-tooth fiber gear 

-1/33" metal washer. Pins are 
1/16" dlam. and 1/8" high 

WINDBACK ASSEMBLY 




HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



C Whether or not judging rests with one 
man or several, a fair and undisputable 
evaluation of all film entries can result 
if each film is analyzed and rated on a 
percentage basis. 



Of all the tasks involved in 
conducting an amateur movie contest, 
certainly the most important, the most 
ticklish and one most subject to criti- 
cism is that assumed by the man or 
men who are to serve as judges. The 
judge's task is a thankless one, at most 
and, as in beauty or baby contests, there 
is always one or more entrants who sin- 
cerely believe their "baby"' should have 
won. 

Considering this, the more prudent 
will either decline to act as a contest 
judge or will set about to decide the 
contest films on a point basis that will 
assure an honest evaluation of each film 
submitted. It should be understood at 
the outset that every contestant expects 
his film to win a prize, even though he 
may be constrained to admit it when 
submitting his film in the competition. 

Having analyzed the outcome, the 
complaints, yes — and the injustices — of 
many cine club contests, the writer 
finds much of the dissension that often 
follows a contest is due entirely to a 
lack of basic principles on which to 
evaluate each contest film. 

For one thing, the task of judging 
pictures is made much easier and tends 
to insure fairer awards, if the entries are 
divided and judged according to class — 
i e., family movies, documentaries, 
photoplays, travelogues, etc. Also, the 
visual impact of color over black and 
white should be considered so that the 
repeal of color will be discounted and 
the color film thus leveled to the plane 
of the black and white film when both 
make up entries in a contest. 

Such specifications, of course, should 
be made known to the contestants so 
that each film can be entered by the 
contestant in the proper classification 
,oi in the classification desired by him. 
Also, it should be compulsory that 
every film be edited and titled. Often 
I have seen films entered in a club con- 
test that, save for the splices linking 
each roll of film as it came from the 
laboratory, had received no particular 
attention at the editing board; and yet 
they possessed material that could, with 
a little effort and editing skill, be 
turned into potential prize winners. As- 
suming that one of the primary reasons 
for conducting a movie contest is to 
stimulate desire of the movie maker in 




HOW TO JUDGE 

A MOVIE CONTEST 

By W. C. CARLETON 

turning out better pictures, it is not too as human interest or appeal). More ad- 
restrictive to expect each contest entry vanced filmers may add to this list the 
to be properly prepared for competition. elements of musical background or 
Progressive cine clubs no longer eval- sound, the latter including all other 
uate contest films solely on the personal forms of sound including oral or re- 
likes or dislikes aroused in the judge or corded narration. 

judges. Today there are theatre-goers In view of the inconsistency that pre- 

v/ho sharply disagree with their neigh- vails among cine clubs in the matter of 

bors on the merits of pictures general- percentage values allotted to each ele- 

ly considered among the best of the ment, it would be unwise to recommend 

year. We have come to know that it is definite figures here. Instead, some pre- 

folly to rely on the emotional reaction vailing percentages will be suggested, 

ct people as the medium for judging Several clubs value continuity at $o r /c ; 

motion pictures. Pictures must be an- entertainment value 20%; and photog- 

alyzed carefully with deliberate consid- raphy, editing and titling each lo'/t ■ 

eration given to each branch of the Another system that is popular with 

art — photography, continuity, edit- many cine clubs is to consider the film 

ing, titling and etc., if an honest eval- 100% at time of entry and then sub- 

uation is to result. tract a certain percentage for each 

So, as we frame the rules and regula- shortcoming or error in continuity, pho- 

tions by which the amateur's films are tography, editing, etc. Thus if a film 

to be judged, we find that the point was penalized 20% on continuity, 10% 

system, or percentages, or whatever you on photography and 15% on titling, it 

choose to call it, is the fairest approach would receive a final rating of 55%. 

to the problem. Already we have classi- A rather new innovation, often 

fied the divisions under which the films termed the "lazy man's method" is to 

zre to be entered. Now we shall classify appraise the first film projected in the 

the elements of each film one by one so contest at 500% and to compare all 

that each film will be analyzed step by other entries with this film, giving them 

step according to these elements. The a higher or lower percentage. Thus, 

eicments are as follows: continuity, pho- the second film projected, if it was bet- 

tography, editing, titling, and enter- ter than the first, would be rated 750%. 

tainment value (sometimes referred to • Continued on Page 220 



215 



PACE 216 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




THE EXPERIMENTAL 



300 Foot Reels 

Owners of Model 70 Kodascope pro- 
jectors can screen 300 foot reels of film 
simply by making a slight alteration in 
the metal film guide under the lower 
sprocket as shown in picture. By filing 
off 1 32 of an inch from this guide, a 
standard 300 foot reel will fit the lower 
takeup spindle. 

No other alterations or adjustments 
are necessary as the top feed spindle eas- 
ily takes a 300-foot reel. Filing the 
guide on the lower sprocket in no way 
affects operation nor efficiency of the 
projector. — Stanley J. Klimoj, Jr., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Daylight Darkroom 

It isn't necessary to wait until night 
2nd the darkness of a locked clothes 
closet in order to wind back film for 
lap-dissolves and other effects. 

With a little practice, anyone can 
perform this feat by placing camera 
and hands under the bedclothes, holding 
clcthes down tight at edge of bed with 



WANTED! 

Those ideas for gadgets, tricks or 
shortcuts in filming, titling, editing 
or processing home movies — pass 
them on to fellow cinebugs through 
these columns. For each idea pub- 
lished, you'll receive two new pro- 
jection reels. 

Write description of your idea 
plainly and when possible accom- 
pany it with a photo, sketch or 
diagram. There's no limit on num- 
ber of ideas you may submit. Ideas 
not immediately published will be 
held for possible future publication 
unless they dupicate ideas previous- 
ly submitted. 

Important: Be sure to mention 
whether your cine equipment is 
8mm. or 16mm. so we may prompt- 
ly forward award adaptable to your 
use. 



body or head. In spite of light colors 
of blankets, sheets, etc., it will be ade- 
quately dark in there if the covers are 
loose and allowed to drape well over 
edge of bed. 

Thus it is possible to make a fade, slip 
into the bedroom and wind back the 
film, and get back to scene of action 
within comparatively few minutes. — 
Lorin Lambert, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Duplicating Films 

I have successfully used my projector 
for making duplicate prints of films, 
making no alterations other than re- 
moving the projection lens and mount- 
ing a home-made lamphouse in the lens 
holder. 

The lamphouse, as shown in sketch, 
was made from a round baking pow- 
der can. A hole was cut in the bottom 
and a piece of metal tubing, 2 inches 
long and of the same diameter as my 
projection lens, was soldered in the hole. 
An ordinary 6-volt automobile head- 



LRMP HOUSE FOR FILM COPYING 



LID- 




TOY TRANSFORMER-* 



light bulb fitted into a suitable socket 
was attached to the lid of the can and 
wired direct to a variable toy trans- 
former. Thus, I was able to control 
density of printing light by varying 
the voltage as well as altering speed of 
the projector. 

In use, the lamp house is inserted into 
the lens holder of projector. The regu- 
lar projection lamp is not used and is 
either disconnected or switched off. 
The two films are threaded into the pro- 
jector with emulsions facing each other 
and run through at a speed determined 
by test. My projector is a model K-8 
Keystone and the lamphouse fits the 
lens tube in such a way that no addi- 
tional light shielding is necessary. With 
other makes of projectors, light leakage 



around the film aperture may become a 
problem, but one easily overcome by 
proper shielding with sheet metal or 
cardboard. — Bill Castor, RT z/C, Gro- 
ton, Conn. 

Color Titles 

I use many of the title cards which 
appear in Home Movies each month. 
I have found that by coloring these ti- 
tles with ordinary dime-store water col- 
or paints, they become very effective 
Kodachrome titles. In using such colors, 
it is important to take the paint direct- 
ly from the cake rather than from a 
mixture thinned by water; otherwise the 
paper surface on which titles are print- 
ed will remain uneven after paint dries. 
— Faye A. Frazier, Washington, D. C. 

Film Cleaner 

Most amateurs do not clean their 
films often enough resulting in particles 
of dust scratching the emulsion or film 
base surface permanently. 

A very simple cleaning device can 
easily be made that may be attached 
either to the editing board or to pro- 
jector, cleaning the films each time they 
?.re used. 

This device is shown in accompany- 
ing diagram. Two small wooden blocks 
are covered on one side with thin strips 
of sponge rubber. The rubber in turn 
is covered with fleecy cotton flannel. 
The two blocks are joined together with 
two metal clips in such a manner as to 
leave about 1 32 inch space between 
for the film which is inserted through 
the open side. 

The device is mounted on a single 
pedestal by means of one screw which 
allows the cleaner to adjust itself to 
the angle of the film as it passes from 
cne reel to another. — Arthur Barkley, 
Oakland, Calif. 



FILM- 




TO 

REWIND 



BRSE OF EDITING BOARD 

rm 



END VIEW 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PACE 217 



cm WORKSHOP 9ad9et)> trUki & 



" CARDBOARD WASHER 

WOODEN BLOCK 



W0O3EN 
SCREWS 



-BROWN 
PAPER 




-INSULATING 
TAPE 

-TURNS OF 
.COPPER WIRE 



fy- STARTING 
BUTTON 




STARTING 
BUTTON. 



Elect-remote Control 

A remote camera control, operating 
by electricity can be useful in many 
phases of cinetography from making ti- 
tles to shooting time lapse or anima- 
tion subjects. 

The essential item necessary is a 
single electric-magnet which may be 
taken from a discarded door-bell or, 
where more power is desired, made by 
the amateur himself, according to de- 
tails given in accompanying diagram 
A. Two heavy cardboard washers, 
i in diameter are fitted on a bolt. 
Bolt is wrapped with several turns of 
brown paper, then wound with enam- 
eled or cotton covered copper wire of 
approximately 32 gauge. Ends of wire 
?re inserted in holes pierced in the card- 
board discs and these form the contacts 
ot electrical leads to be spliced to the 
current supply. 

Figs. B and C show application of 
the magnet in operating starting but- 
ton of various cameras. Used in a ver- 
tical assembly, as shown in Fig. B, it 
will operate starting buttons of such 
cameras as 8mm. Filmos, 8mm. and 
1 6mm. Cine Kodaks, Victor, etc. Used 
in horizontal assembly as sketched in 
Fig. C, the device will operate cameras 
such as Keystone, Bolex, Cine Special, 
etc. — Marvin Maltz, Detroit, Mich. 



Projector Blimp 



Where light escaping from projector 
hmphouse is overly bright, affecting 
s< reen brilliance or proving annoying to 
spectators, tne annoyance can i>e over- 
come by covering projector with a suit- 
able corr'.gated carton. First cut a hole 
correspo iding to lens position and an- 
other ' oie near top of box at the rear 
foi v ntilation of the lamphouse and an 
effifKrit "blimp" will be had that shields 
bcth extraneous light and sound from 
tne room. To thread projector, etc., the 
"olimp" may be lifted, and replaced 
again before resuming projection. — A. 
L. Clement, Ft. Worth, Tex. 



r 

/sr TITLE BOARD 




Its" A 
FIXED MIRROR, 

CAMERA)— 



Title Wipeoffs 



Genuine title wipeoffs — where one 
title actually "wipes off" the preced- 
ing one — can easily be made by any am- 
ateur willing to rig up the simple ap- 
paratus illustrated in accompanying 
sketch. 

As indicated in the sketch, two title 
boards are involved — one in the custo- 
mary position directly ahead of the cam- 
era and the other not so far distant and 
somewhat to the left. Two mirrors set 
at 45 0 angles also are employed. The 
cne at position D is fixed while the one 
at point A-B is affixed in a suitable 
track so that it may be moved diagonal- 
ly before the lens to effect the wipe-off. 

The wipeoff is accomplished as fol- 
lows: Title on first titleboard is photo- 
graphed for desired length, then sliding 
mirror is moved forward. This gradu- 
ally cuts off title No. 1 from view and 
brings, by reflection, title No. 2 into 



shortcut* contri- 
buted by, ClnebugJ 



view. Sharp focus of both titles is in- 
sured by having the distances ABC and 
ABDE equal. 

No dimensions are given here because 
figures would differ for various makes 
of cameras or various size titles. The 
fixed mirror must be larger than the 
sliding mirror as it receives the image 
proportionately larger than does the 
sliding mirror. — G. F. Krtill, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Windbacks 

Windback — or backwind, which- 
ever you choose to call it — it is a com- 
paratively simple innovation to add to 
most cine cameras. In principle, wind- 
ing back film consists of turning back 
the main camera sprocket and this can 
be done by piercing the camera case and 
making contact with the protruding 
end of the sprocket shaft. 

In some cameras, shaft protrudes as 
much as one-fourth inch. In such cases, 
all that is necessary is to file a key- 
way in end of shaft so it will fit your 
backwind key. Where shaft is too short, 
it must be drilled in center and a short 
stud, machined to take key, fitted to it, 

Every precaution should be followed, 
of course in. removing camera mechan- 
ism from case. An extended study of 
the camera mechanism should enable the 
worker to proceed with safety. — John 
S. Moniak, Chicago, III. 



CiA5E 




DRILL HOLE 
IN CASE 

O 



FIT KEY 
TO SOCKET 
SHAFT 



PAGE 218 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




WHERE TO RENT OR BUY 8MM. and 16MM. FILMS 



1 O augment your home movie shows, make use of the fine libraries 
of rental films, both sound and silent, maintained by your photo dealer for 
owners of 8mm. and i6mm. projectors. Rental rates are surprisingly low and 
new films are added at regular intervals. Dealers listed below will gladly assist 
with suggestions for one reel to full evening programs: 



CALIFORNIA 

HOLLYWOOD 

Bailey Film Service 

1651 Cosmo Street 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 

716 N. La Brea Ave. 

Castle's Inc. 

1529 Vine Street 

LOS ANGELES 

Films Incorporated 
170? W. 8th Street 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1221 G St., N. W. 

ILLINOIS 

BERWYN 

Colonial Camera Shop 
6906 Windsor Ave. 

CHICAGO 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
1825 Larchmont Ave. 

Films Incorporated 
64 E. Lake Street 

General Camera Company 
2308 West Devon Avenue 



KANSAS 



WICHITA 



Lewis Film Exchange 
216 East 1st St. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



Don Elder's Film Library 
739 Boylston St., Dept. HM. 

Frank Lane and Company 
5 Little Building 



OUINCY 



Stanley-Winthroo's "Rent-A-Reel" Service 
5-7 Revere Road 



MICHIGAN 



DETROIT 



Detroit Camera Shop 
325 State Street 



NEW YORK 



KENMORE 



Nixon Camera & Photo Supply Co. 
2811 Delaware Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Bell & Howell Filmosound Library 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Films Incorporated 
330 W. 42nd St. 

Walter O. Gutlohn, Inc. 
25 West 45th St. 

Haber & Fink, Inc. 
12-14 Warren St. 

Medo Photo Supply 
15 West 47th St. 

National Cinema Service 
69 Dey Street 

Nu-Art Films, Inc. 
145 West 45th Street 



OHIO 



CINCINNATI 



Haile & Assoc. (B & H Branch) 
215 Walnut St. (Within 100 Miles) 



DAYTON 



Dayton Film (8-16) Rental Libraries 
2227 Hepburn Ave. 



OREGON 



PORTLAND 



Films Incorporated 
314 S. W. 9th Avenue 



TEXAS 



DALLAS 



National Ideal Pictures, Inc. 
2024 Main St. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON 



Elmer B. Simpson 
816 W. Virginia St. 



you want a 
FILM to ihow 

. . . NEWS OF TIMELY SUBJECTS 
FOR HOME PROJECTORS 




Axis Smashed In Africa is Castle 
Films new release in 8mm. and 16mm. 
for July. It shows vividly not only the 
fury of African warfare as American, 
British and French troops storm one po- 
sition after another en route to Bizerte 
and Tunis, but also the strategy which 
brought about the Axis' wholesale col- 
h pse. Bewildered Axis troops give up in 
droves. A quarter million men surren- 
der unconditionally and are made pris- 
oners. Every foot of this film is valu- 
able document for 8mm. and 16mm. 
projector owners commemorating the 
United Nation's first major defeat of 
the Axis. Distribution is through pho- 
tographic dealers at standard Castle 
Films prices. 




Highlights of Lincoln's Career is a 
one-reel 16mm. sound film portraying 
historic episodes of the life of the great 
president, beginning with the Lincoln- 
Douglas debates and dealing with im- 
portant events during the critical Civil 
War period. Presented graphically with 
historic fidelity in brief, well-edited 
shots, it concludes with Lincoln's trag- 
ic assassination. Walter Houston is fea- 
tured. Distribution by Nu-Art Films, 
Inc., 145 W. 45th St., New York City. 
Sale price is $45.00, rental $2.00. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PAGE 219 




Paris Calling is a thrilling story of 
the French underground movement for 
freedom. Mass flight from invading Na- 
zis, hairbreadth escapes from the Ges- 
tapo, an ingenious secret radio trans- 
mitter, and a breath-taking commando 
raid are highlights of the picture which 
was produced by Universal and stars 
Randolph Scott and Elizabeth Bergner. 
This latest Filmosound Library release 
will be available July 16th from Bell 
& Howell Co., 1 80 1 Larchmont Ave., 
Chicago. It consists of 12 reels and 
rents for $ 17.50. 




Code of the Red Man is a 7-reel 
Monogram production now available in 
1 6mm. sound. Its a thrilling drama of 
the wilderness told against the back- 
ground of an Indian village on the 
southwest frontier and featuring the 
wonder horse, "Thunder." Many import- 
ant roles are enacted by full blooded 
Indians from various western tribes. 
Flighlight is spectacular fight between 
"Thunder" and another wild horse. 
Distribution is by Commonwealth Pic- 
tures Corp., 29 7th Ave., N. Y. C. 

Leading Lizzy Astray, 200 feet 
8mm., features Mack Swain, Slim Sum- 
merville and Fatty Arbuckle, prime 
comedy favorites of silent days, in a 
story dealing with a farmer's daughter 
in the clutches of a dastardly villain. 
1 6mm. prints are also available for 
rental. Distribution is by Fun Film 
Library, 545 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. Catalog and rates on request. 






Photographing the whimsical moods of Nature 
is one of the most thrilling games in the world 
... so gratifying when every trait of tonal gran- 
deur is fully revealed in negative and print. 
But the subtle play of light and shade in such a 
view as the one caught here, and in hundreds 
of similar scenes, presents baffling exposure 
problems that take a Master to master. For 
the Master's unique and exclusive exposure- 
control dial, its correct and highly selective 
viewing angle and its extreme Weston preci- 
sion, provide its owner perfect mastery over 
every photographic condition . . . assuring a true 
recording of the scene that inspired the shot. 
Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, 585 
Frelinghuysen Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. 



WESTON gxpoitm Sketfa 



TITLE CENTERING GUIDES 

tor all popular makes of 8mm. and 16mm. cameras 
IN PAMPHLET FORM 

10c EACH 

Now ready for the following cameras: 

Revere 8mm. (All models) — 8mm. Magazine Cine Kodak — Single-lens 8mm, 
Filmo — 8mm. Turret Filmo — 8mm. Cine Kodaks 20, 25 and 60 — 8mm. Key- 
stone — 16mm. Cine Kodak K — 16mm. Model 70 Filmos — 121 Filmo — 141 
Filmo — Cine Kodak E — Cine Kodak K. 

Be Sure to Specify Make and Model and Camera When Ordering 

HOME MOVIES MAGAZINE 

6060 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, Califcrnia 



PAGE 220 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




AID THE 
WAR EFFORT 

We need immediately the fol- 
lowing 16mm. camera equip- 
ment tot flight test work: 

3 — Cine Kodak Special Cameras 
3 — 15mm. F 2.7 wide angle lens 
3 — Extra 100' Magazines 
3 — Extra 200' Magazines 

BOEING AIRCRAFT CO. 

City Purchasing Dept. 
Seattle, Washington 



^Windback and 3 

• Continued from Page 214 

shield wiper. Balance of pa-ts are better 
described in the diagram. 

A 13/32" hole was drilled in the cam- 
era c?.se and the gear shaft bushing (D) 
was inserted and made fast to the case 
by expanding end of bushing, riveting it 
by means of metal punch and hammer 
as shown at C. Then the bushing was 
further secured by application of a ring 
of solder around it on outside of case. 

The windback shaft shown at D, was 
then inserted in the bushing. The rest of 
the assembly, shown at E, was next fit- 
ted in place and a thin film of solder 
applied to the end washer to lock the 
assembly securely together. 

It is important to explain that the 
star-shaped hole and the pin-studded 
washer were required only because a 
fiber gear was used. These prevented the 
gear from stripping on the shaft. Had a 
metal gear been used, these features 
would not be necessary. 

Before the motor chassis was re- 
turned to the camera case and connect- 
ed with the windback shaft, I also built 
in a simple frame counter. This consists 
of a footage dial applied over the large 
brass gear of the mechanism and which 
has been calibrated in single frames. 
A triangular window is cut in the cam- 
era case as shown in Fig. 1, and also at 
B. Fig 2, for observation of the dial. 

To arrive at number of frames of 
film that passed through camera during 
one complete revolution of the brass 
gear, I threaded a length of exposed film 
into my camera, made a pencil mark on 
the film where it entered the gate and 
another mark on the gear, then ran the 
motor until the gear had made one com- 
plete revolution. Counting the frames, 
I found that one revolution of the gear 
equaled 52 frames. 
I A disc of paper, slightly smaller than 
i diameter of gear was drawn on heavy 
white paper. Another circle, about 1 
inch in diameter was drawn inside of 
this and cut out with a razor blade. This 
left a ring of paper, as shown at A. This 
was accurately calibrated with 52 lines 
(not spaces) around its perimeter which 
were numbered consecutively from 1 to 
52, clockwise. The dial was cemented 
on the gear, then given a coat of clear 
lacquer. 

The dial window was cut in camera 
case as shown at B, Fig. 2. This was cov- 
ered on the inside with a small piece of 
clear celluloid cemented to camera case. 
A fine hairline was etched in center of 
celluloid and filled with black pigment 
as a guide line. 

With these two ieatures completed, it 
was a simple job to return motor chassis 
to case and make the camera and its 



rame-counter . . . 



new gadgets ready for use. One precau- 
tion that must be taken in re-assembling 
camera, is to make sure stop-pin in the 
brass gear is in stop position against 
the release button lever, and to maneu- 
ver the gear connected to pull claw so 
that it meshes with the driving gear 
with claw in position. If, after camera 
is first tested, shutter is found not to 
be in the right position, I discovered it 
could easily be adjusted by means of a 
small ignition wrench. 

Winding back the film is accom- 
plished by inserting the key, shown at 
F, in the windback shaft and turning 
back the film for the desired number 
of frames. This is an ordinary clock 
key to which a metal pin has been add- 
ed to fit key way of windback shaft. 

As with most home-made windback 
jobs, no provision has been made for 
taking up the wound-back film. There 
is sufficient room in the film chamber 
to accommodate the 40 to jo frame 
length of film of the average windback 
without danger of jamming camera me- 
chanism. At least mine has never given 
me any trouble. 

Judging 

Atovie Content* 

• Continued from Page 2/5 

If it was considered not as good, it 
would be rated 250%. The third film, 
then, is screened in competition with 
the first two. If it is considered better 
than the second film but not as good as 
the first, it is rated 625%. Thus, the 
judging continues, allowing the mean 
percentage figure between the two films 
considered closest competitors. After 
judging is completed, the film given 
the highest percentage is the first place 
winner. 

It should be emphasized that color 
must not unduly sway the opinions of 
judges in the elemental or over-all eval- 
uation of a picture. Color is a power- 
ful element, influencing as it does a 
greater natural response to pictures 
made on color film. But if we are to 
judge a picture solely on its elemental 
merits — photography, continuity, edit- 
ing, etc — color must be disregarded en- 
tirely where black and white films are 
in competition- 

It frequently happens that an other- 
wise mediocre picture is regarded a prize 
winner simply on the basis of one or pos- 
sibly two exceptionally well photo- 
graphed or enacted sequences. Respon- 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PAGE 221 



sibl» contest judges should not allow 
one or two good scenes or sequences to 
over-influence their judgment where 
rest of the picture is of mediocre or 
lower level. A 400-foot picture should 
be judged on the average quality of the 
full 400 feet, not upon a specially well 
sequenced or photographed hundred 
ieet of it. 

Another factor to be considered is 
fatigue of the judges. Where contest en- 
tries are numerous, the pictures shown 
last are bound to suffer from apathy of 
the judging staff, tired from viewing 
too many films. In such cases, it is ad- 
visable to conduct judging in two or 
more sessions, classifying the films and 
screening one classification at a time. 

Films accompanied by a scored selec- 
tion of recordings for background mu- 



sic or prepared discs of sound, music 
and narrative are frequently a basis for 
controversy in contests where strictly 
silent films are entered. No one will dis- 
pute the fact that any amateur who 
takes the additional pains to arrange a 
musical score for his film or to produce 
a special disc recording for it, is entitled 
to additional credit for his efforts. Still, 
there will be those less fortunate film- 
ers who claim that the man with means 
who can afford a recorder and a turn- 
table to play the records, has a tremen- 
dous advantage. 

Such a controversy suggests that 
both the silent and the sound contest- 
ants must be willing to give ground, if 
necessary, in the competition. If the 
picture accompanied by musical score 
or recorded sound is definitely in the 



WANTED: Volunteer 16mm Cinetographers ! 

THE Seaman's Service, Inc., a welfare organization that cares for mer- 
chant seamen stricken or disabled in line of war-time duty, are desirous of 
making a 16mm. motion picture depicting the scope of their organization 
which embraces hotels, rest homes and recreation centers in thirteen United 
States seaports. Some of the nation's top i6mm. filmers are capable of shoot- 
ing the kind of pictures wanted by this organization which later will be 
edited and titled to form a complete, concise record of their activities. 

Philip Ketchum, Pacific Coast Regional Director, having witnessed the 
splendid work of several amateur movie makers, has asked Home Movies 
to aid in recruiting services of volunteer 16mm. cameramen in each of the 13 
cities listed below, to film scenes of activities in each port. 

The United Seaman's Service, Inc., will supply the film. Cinetographers 
who volunteer for this project must be top ranking amateurs with 16mm. 
equipment capable of good photography on interiors as well as exteriors. 
Volunteers should also possess adequate floodlighting equipment for in- 
terior shots. Necessary photoflood lamps can be supplied. 

Competent cinetographers willing to serve this worthy cause are re- 
quested to communicate at once with the nearest port executive officer 
listed below who will arrange an interview: 



R. A. Watson, Port Executive Officer 

United Seamen's Service 

621 S. Sprng Street, Los Angeles 

Vincent Fallon, Port Executive Officer 

United Seamen's Service 

564 Market Street 

San Francisco, California 

T. J. Edmonds, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
219 S. W. 6th Avenue 
Portland, Oregon 

Carlton Lindquist, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
30 E. 37th Street 
New York City. 

Victor Bowyer, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
1422 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Jack Kamaiko, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
201 Proctar Street 
Port Arthur, Texas 



H. C. Crandall, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
Hotel York, Norfolk, Va. 

J. Bcbelaar, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
150 E. Bay Street 
Charleston, S. C. 

Walter Scott, Regional Director 
United Seamen s Service 
20 S. 15th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. Lesley Gamel, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
2023 Ave. E 
Galveston, Texas 

George Blacktop, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
607 Government Street 
Mobile, Ala. 

Capt. McLaughlin, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
3628 St. Charles Ave. 
New Orleans, La. 



Henry Loft, Port Executive Officer 
United Seamen's Service 
40$ Insurance Bldg. 
Seattle, Washington 



*★★*★*★★ 



SERVING WW 
FRONT WITH 
CLEARER PICTURES 



BATTLE FRONTS! 



TRAINING FRONTS! 
HOME FRONTS! 





PROJECTION SCREENS 

Are Now Available in 
Non-Critical Materials 

^ We are proud, at Radiant, 
of our ever-increasing service 
to our armed forces. All over 
the world Radiant Screens — 
portable — easily set up or hung 
up — are bringing brighter, 
clearer pictures. But you on the 
home front want the best too 
— and you can still enjoy it, for 
your own pictures, or the many 
war films now available, such 
as the late Castle release, "Axis 
Smashed." 

Your dealer may still have 
one of the famous Radiant pre- 
war screens. If not, he can 
show you a full, new line in 
non-critical materials. The 
screen surface is, of course, the 
unsurpassed Radiant "Hy- 
Flect" glass-beaded fabric, with 
its perfect, clean-cut brilliance 
— its lifetime whiteness. Ask 
your dealer for Radiant Screens. 

RADIANT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

Young in Years — Old in Achievement 
11 40 W. Superior St Chicago, Ml. 
★ ★★★★★★★ 



PACE 222 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



BUY WAR BONDS 




New Features for Your Filmo 

• If you want features offered by newest 
Filmo models which your dealer can't de- 
liver immediately, chances are that B&H 
craftsmen can add them to your present 
Filmo Camera or Projector. New "Mod- 
ernization Folders" give details and costs. 
Ask your dealer or write, stating your Filmo 
model. 



winning class and the music or sound 
enhances it, then it should be given the 
nod over any film that would tie it in 
srrictly silent presentation. 

On the other hand, where a picture 
rates second or third but the musical 
score or sound rates excellent, the supe- 
rior silent film should be favored on the 
basis of better movie making. 

In evaluating a musical score or 
sound accompaniment, the choice of the 
musical selections should be considered 
rather than the quality of the music 
played. The wealthy club member may 
easily afford the best turntables, ampli- 
fier and speakers but fail in his choice 
of musical selections to be played with 
l is film. On the other hand, the con- 
testant with a skillful and harmonious 



musical score may be able to present it 
cn a single turntable of home construc- 
tion. It's the contestant's individual ef- 
forts that must be considered, not his 
equipment. 

The results of movie making compe- 
titions judged on the basis set forth here 
will, in most cases, prove acceptable to 
ull contestants where the basis of judg- 
ing is explained to them at time contest 
i« announced. Dissenters, if there be 
any, may then be considered simply as 
one of the necessary evils that accom- 
pany any undertaking. 

NOTE: This is the first of a series of three ar- 
ticles on amateur moiie contests by W. G. 
Carlefon. Future articles will discuss the ama- 
teur's problems in preparing his film for com- 
petition an J those of the club conducting the 
contest. — Ed. 



Use This Timely NtW SCRVICC Jlovie of tke Motltk . . . 

• If vou own a Bell Howell Camera or V 



• If you own a Bell & Howell Camera or 
Projector, you have something that might 
be difficult to replace now. So you'll want 
to take especially good care of it. Do this 
with assurance and economy by using our 
new Standard-Price Service Plan. See your 
dealer or write for prices on the three 
classes of our new, economical, mainte- 
nance and repair service. Bell& Howell 
Company, 1825 Larchmont Ave., Chicago; 
New York; Hollywood; Washington, D. C; 
London. Established 1907. 

PRECISION-MADE BY 




MOVIE MAKERS' 
FAVORITE... 

tor Vibrationless Pictures 
tor Smoother Performance 
for Increased Steadiness 




UNI-POD 



The perfect accessory for movie 
makers who take pride in their 
work. Length of the leg is in- 
stantly adjustable to bring cam- 
era to eye level by the famous Royal "Quick-Lock." 
Extends to 59 in. from collapsed size of 33 in. Equip- 
ped with reversible rubber and metal tips to make 
it skid proof. The finish is rustless chrome over 
lightweight tubular steel with black plastic handle 
and genuine leather thong-type strap. 

A REMARKABLE VALUF AT $5.50. 
Dept. G-9 



• Continued from Page 2/0 

spinning title. Opening scenes show 
hundreds of automobiles on highways — 
citizens bent on one final outing before 
summer officially ends. We see families 
in crowded trolley cars bound for a 
cool, green park — a pleasureland at the 
edge of the city replete with huge shade 
trees, a merry-go-round, roller coaster, 
chute-the-chutes and other concessions. 
Kiddies as well as grown ups, laughing 
and gay, crowd the concession. 

The spinning title spins again, this 
time to announce the next holiday — 
Thanksgiving. A family assembles 
around the festive table adorned by a 
huge roast turkey. Father leads them 
i". a prayer of thanks. The little boy, 
stealing a glance toward his father, 
reaches for a turkey leg. But father 
catches him in the act, admonishes him 
to return it. 

The camera, trained on the appetiz- 
ing turkey fades to a closeup of a foot- 
ball which introduces the national sport 
of that season. There are many inter- 
esting scenes of players on the gridiron, 
the rooting section and of spectators. 
The sequence ends with a shot of two 
dogs playing their own brand of foot- 
bill — a tug of war with a toy foot- 
ball. 

Christmas day is next — the biggest 
holiday of all. Creveling set the mood 
for the season by filming a cleverly 
faked snowstorm scene in which tiny 
bits of paper w r ere floated down be- 
fore the camera lens to simulate snow. 
This scene fades to a shot of three 
youthful choristers singing Christmas 
Carols in church. There's a shot of a 
tiny tot standing up in his crib as he 
anticipates the coming of Santa Claus. 
Creveling depicts his thoughts in a dou- 
ble exposed shot in which Santa and 
his reindeers flit across the scene in a 
sort of a mirage. Then there's a big 



laughing Santa beside a gaily decorated 
tree in a department store window; 
shots of toy displays in department 
stores. A highlight is the fine job of 
lighting done on all interiors. 

Closing sequence depicts New Years 
Eve. This opens on the interior of a 
nightclub. The orchestra is playing 
while performers in specialty numbers 
go through their paces. The tables are 
crowded with merrymakers in ridicu- 
lous hats and tangled in serpentines. 
Scmeone starts a Conga line. At the 
stroke of twelve, an inebriated celebrant 
tears the clock from the wall and as- 
sumes head of the Conga line. 

The tag title asks: "What is your 
favorite holiday?" 

This is a picture that any amateur 
movie maker could film. But Creveling 
has done a masterful job, both from 
point of continuity as well as photog- 
raphy. In a peculiar way, Creveling 
pointed up interest in each sequence 
to elevate the picture far above the us- 
ual catch-as-can filming of such events. 




REEL FELLOWS 

Cuts of the official Reel 
Fellows emblem are now 
mailable to Reel Fellows 
and Reel Fellow chapters 
who wish to include the 
emblem on personal or 
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— the one shown here and 1^4 by 2 
inches — cuts are loaned free of charge. 

Reel Fellows chapters and individual 
members planning stationery may secure 
loan of cuts by writing to The Secretary, 
Reel Fellows, c o Home Moiies, 6060 
Sunset Blvd., Holly uood, Calif. 



CENTRAL 



C AMERA CO . Since 
H^^MH 1899 



230 S. Wabash Ave.. Chicago 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PACE 223 



The secret lies in the fact that Crevel- 
ing didn't awake one day to find he had 
a lot of loose footage on holiday events 
that might be put together to make a 
screenable picture. He purposely plan- 
ned his picture the way it appears on 
the screen. He conceived the idea of 
asking "What Is Your Favorite Holi- 
day" and of picturing each American 
holiday in a nostalgic manner certain 
to prove entertaining to any audience 
privileged to see it. 

"Collecting shots for 'What's Your 
Favorite Holiday,' " said Creveling, 
"Entailed a whole year's filming; for in 
most instances, the scenes depicting 
each holiday were actually filmed on 
that holiday. The Fourth of July se- 
quence, for example, was made during 
the exercises at Independence Hall in 
Philadelphia. The Easter fashion par- 
ade was filmed on the Atlantic City 
Boardwalk. 

"I must confess that a certain 
amount of 'faking' had to be done be- 
cause Uncle Sam called me in August. 
So I filmed the Labor Day sequence in 
advance — on a holiday, incidentally — 
which provided the very atmosphere 
I wanted." 

Creveling's film is significant for two 
reasons: not only is it a carefully pro- 
duced picture but it demonstrates what 
c. serious amateur can do in these times 
in spite of film shortages and tire and 
gasoline rationing. Not to mention an 
interruption bv Uncle Sam. 

Photoflood 

Substitute* . . . 

• Continued from Pag.? 207 

ability to successful photographic use, 
especially in color photography. The 
color temperature of photofloods is nat- 
urally high inasmuch as these bulbs are 
designed especially for photographic 
use. It is the lumen and color tempera- 
ture ratings, then, that will serve as 
basis of comparison between the three 
standard photofloods and the lamps sug- 
gested as substitutes. 

The No. 2 photoflood consumes 500 
watts, has a rated life of 6 hours. Rated 
lumens at 115 volts is 17,000 and the 
mean color temperature is 3400 0 Kel- 
vin — the same as the No. 1. The R-2 
photoflood consumes 500 watts, it's 
rated life is the same as the No. 2, but 
it's lumen rating drops to 4500 beam 
lumens in the o to 30 0 zone. How- 
ever, this reflector type lamp concen- 
trates an intense beam of light within 
a radius of 30 0 , giving it a rated maxi- 
mum beam candlepower of 6400 at 10 
feet. 

All four lamps suggested as photo- 
flood substitutes are products of Gen- 
eral Electric Company. The first is the 
joo watt T-20 projection lamp with a 



n:ted life of 50 hours compared to the 
5- and 6-hour photofloods. Of course, 
the T-20 costs more — $2.20, as com- 
pared to 15c for the No. 1 photoflood 
or 30c for the No. 2 — but it lasts al- 
most 17 times as long, actually giving 
more life for the money invested. Lu- 
men rating of the T-20 is 13,000 at 1 1 5 
volts against the 8650 of the No. 1 
photoflood and 17,000 of the No. 2 
which makes it more powerful than the 
No. 1, slightly less powerful than the 
No. 2. The color temperature of the 
T-20 is approximately 3 1 8 5 0 Kelvin 
compared to 3400 0 Kelvin for photo- 
floods. It is the most logical photoflood 
substitute for all around cinetography, 
possessing as it does greater lumen and 
color temperature rating than the other 
three photoflood substitutes. It's one 
drawback, perhaps is that it must be 
burned base down. 

The next lamp is the globular 40V 
watt G-30, ordinarily used as a spotlight' 
bulb. It sells for $1.75 and has a rated 
life of 200 hours at 115 volts. Lumen 
rating is 8000 at 115 volts — slightly 
under the No. 1 photoflood — and the 
color temperature is approximately 
298 5 0 Kelvin. An important feature is 
that this bulb may be burned in any po- 
sition, making it possible to use it in 
my type of metal reflector. 

A lamp similar in physical appear- 
ance to the R-2 photoflood is the 300 
watt R-40, a reflector-flood lamp with 
a heavy lens-like surface that concen- 
trates an intense beam of light — 3000 
maximum beam candlepower at 10 feet. 
This lamp sells for $1.40 and has a rated 
life of 1000 hours. Rated initial zone lu- 
mens are 1600 at 1 1 5 volts in the o to 
30 0 zone and no figures are available on 
its color temperature. It is an excellent 
light for spot-light effects and some 
outstanding photographic results have 
been attained using fast pan film with 
the scene lighted only with a few R-40 
lamps. This lamp may be burned in any 
position, but due to its intense heat, 
only a porcelain socket should be used. 

The fourth lamp is an ordinary 300 
watt household lamp that retails at 45c 
and has a rated life of 750 hours when 
burned at 115 volts. Lumen rating is 
5850 and its color temperature is esti- 
mated at approximately 29 50 0 Kelvin. 
As with all household lamps, it may be 
burned in any position, making it adapt- 
able to use in any reflector. 

It may be said that all of these lamps 
will serve satisfactorily to illuminate in- 
terior settings for cinetography with 
panchromatic film. They are also adapt- 
able to Kodachrome photography but 
with some slight effect in the color re- 
sult, due to their inherent lower color 
temperature — a prime factor in obtain- 
ing normal results with type A Koda- 
chrome. 

The use of blue filters or transparen- 



8mm. -THE WORLD IN COLOR- 16mm. 

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scene $1.00. Kodachrome Slides and Movies for 
Grown-ups; and Children. Most any subject. Color, 
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plete lists 10c in coin. Stamp brings all catalogues. 

"GLAMOUR NEWSREELS" featuring stunning 
beauties, Majorettes in action and Bathing Queens. 
SPECIAL Vol. 4, 50' 8mm. regularly $2.00 for $1.25; 
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Sample, complete lists, 10c in coin. Stamp brings all 
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MISCELLANEOUS 
BAIA precision All-Metal 8mm. Film Slitter... $3.00 

BOLEX CINELAC, film preservative, bottle 1.00 

BOLEX LENS CLEANER, bottle 35 

WELD- ALL FILM CEMENT, safety or nitrate .30 
FOTOFADE DYE for making Chemical Fades ... 1.25 

FOTOFADE WIPE-OFF TAPE, per roll 60 

CINETINTS. Set 6 Colors with Instructions ... 3.25 

DuPONT VISCOSE SPONGES, each 35 

TITLE DEVELOPER, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
HYPO FIXING BATH, tubes, each make 16 oz. .15 
PERFORATING 16mm. films for double 8 

Cameras. 100 ft $2.00 

HOME MOVIES, Back Numbers, 1937-1938 15 

1940-1941-1942-1943 30 

1937— May, June, Aug.. Sept., Dec. 1938— April. 
June, July. Aug., Sept., Oct. 1940 — March, April, 
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Double 8 50c Univex 8 15c 

EXTRA CANS Double 8mm. and Single 8 size...,10c 
MOVIE TITLES ARE EASY TO MAKE 
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100 ft. $1.00; 16mm. 100 ft. $1.25; 8mm. Clear, 
'Salmon Pink, Lavender. 16mm. Clear, Red, Special 
iBlue, These tints available while limited supply 
■ /lasts. For duration, all will be clear base. 
Title Instructions Free with Film Orders 
Cash, Check or M. O. for quick service! 
Add 25c for Special Delivery. Overpayments refunded 
or credited. No stamps, please. Phone Lincoln 1207. 

W. STUART BUSSEY FILM LAB. 

17 E. ST, JOSEPH 8T. INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 





FROM KODACHROMES BY 

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AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 



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write for complete list to 

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995-A Merchandise Mart, Chicago 



PACE 224 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




Hollywood Azure . . 

ESO-D 

Our new popular MONOCOLOR 8mm. 
emulsion for all double 8mm. and 
Tnivex 8mm. cameras. Prices quoted below Include spool- 
ing and processing without additional charge. Processed 
and slit ready for projection under license with the East- 
man Kodak Company. 

ESO-D— An attractive azure ortho film for home movies, 
projecting as an attractive sky-blue. Excellent supple- 
ment for Kodachrome movies. $1.30 per spool. $3.65 per 
three spools. 

ESO-A ortho at $1.20; ESO-B super-ortho at $1.25; 
ESO-C Sepia at $1.30; ESO-G scarlet at $1.25 and two 
panchromatic films at $2.00 and $2.35 are also avail- 
able and listed in our Spring catalog. 

SEPTEMBER 1st. 1943 

. . . . Marks the close of all ESO-S laboratory services 
for the duration! This means that: 

1. All ESO-S films sold WITH PROCESSING (or 
without processing) must be postmarked not later 
than September 1st if we are to finish them for you. 
Those received after that date must necessarily be 
returned for processing elsewhere. 

2. All free film bonuses must be redeemed before 
Sept. 1st. In most instances these are not payable 
in cash, but in trade, only. 

We are giving three months' notice so that you will have 
time to expose your ESO-S films and get them to us in 
time. This date, September 1st, is final. Please get those 
films to us as soon as possible to avoid disappointment! 

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Flynn, Cary Grant, William Holden, Louis Hayword, 
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these lamps has been known to improve 
photographic results inasmuch as a blue 
filter increases the color temperature, 
but with some diminishing of the lu- 
men value, requiring an increase in the 
number of lamps used. 

Movie amateurs, eager to continue 
their hobby will find that these lamps 
remove the only war-time obstacle to 
indoor cinetography. It is recommended 



that their use be gauged first by suitable 
tests to determine exactly how many 
Limps are adequate to light a setting 
lormerly covered with photofloods. By 
shooting a test on one scene and keep- 
ing a record of the meter reading, it is 
Lossible to determine the procedure for 
shooting all other interior sets in which 
these substitute lamps are used for illu- 
mination. 



Qoing, to (Build a ZJitler . . ? 



• Continued from Page 212 

smoothly back and forth from the 
c?rd holder. This feature is illustrated 
in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. 

What size titles will we wish to 
make? Actually, this should be our first 
consideration. The camera lens equip- 
ment available, of course, may deter- 
mine this for us. Where auxiliary lenses 
are to be used, the titler may be de- 
signed to photograph titles 3 J/ 8 inches 
by 2^8 inches (typewriter titler size) 
up to any desired size, depending upon 
the auxiliary lenses available. Where 
titles are to be photographed with the 
regular camera lens equipment — and 
such lenses must be in focusing mount 
— the closest the lens will photograph 
must be considered and the titler de- 
signed accordingly. If camera lens can 
be focused on objects as near as 2 feet, 
then it will be possible to photograph 
titles without aid of an auxiliary lens 
by placing camera so lens-to-title card 
distance is 24 inches and the smallest 
title card area is 9 54 by 7 x /% inches. 

Where auxiliary lenses are to be used, 
the lens holder should be so designed 
that it may be folded down on titler 
b.ise when not required; also it should 
provide means for quickly changing 
from one size auxiliary lens to another 
— holding each lens accurately centered 
before the camera lens. Distance from 
camera lens should never exceed 1 inch 
from front element of camera lens. This 
suggests that each auxiliary lens should 
be permanently marked as to its diopter 
s;ze or focusing range. As most of these 
ltnses are considerably larger than the 
camera lens, the size can be inked on a 
small piece of gummed tape and affixed 
to edge of lens. 

Source of illumination is an import- 
ant consideration. With priorities on 
photofloods, we may frequently be com- 
pelled to use sunlight for lighting ti- 
tles. But our titler should be equipped 
for photoflood lighting. Even where 
photoflood lamps cannot be had, there 
are a number of high powered lamps 
still available (See elsewhere in this is- 
sue. — Ed.) which will provide light of 
sufficient volume and color for either 
black and white or Kodachrome film- 
ing. Photofloods or substitutes should 



be used in reflectors only so that all of 
the light will be concentrated upon the 
title. 

Positioning the photofloods, or per- 
haps we should say the lamp fixtures, 
must be given very special attention in 
order that light from the lamps will 
spread evenly over the title card sur- 
, face. Unless lamp fixtures are placed 
far enough away from title card holder 
and at the right angle, "hot spots" are 
certain to result. A fairly accurate rule 
to follow is to place the lamp fixtures 
at a distance twice as far from center 
cf title card as width of the title. That 
is, if title card is 12 inches wide, lights 
should be placed not less than 24 inches 
from center of title. 

Lights should be mounted on mov- 
able arms, as illustrated in Fig. 1, so 
they may be adjusted according to size 
of title card and distance of camera 
from title. Adjustment should afford 
moving lights to or away from title as 
well as swing them from center to side. 

Zoom effects were mentioned earlier 
?nd this feature brings up the question 
of how should lights be set for this par- 
ticular type of title shot. In all zoom 
shots, lights should remain fixed at the 
predetermined distance from title board. 
Only the camera should move toward or 
away from title in the zoom if density 
of title is to remain same throughout 
the zoom effect. 

Our considerations up to this point 
have been in the design of a horizontal 
titler, a titler which can be set up on a 
t.ible anywhere for the purpose of mak- 
ing a single main title or a complete 
titling job from main to end title, us- 
ing printed, typed or hand-lettered title 
cards. 

Where animated effects are to be in- 
cluded in the makeup of titles, then 
we shall have to consider designing our 
titler so it operates in vertical position 
— the title board serving as the titler 
base and the camera mounted overhead 
shooting down vertically toward the ti- 
tle. Such a titler involves very little 
change in construction over one of hor- 
izontal design except that it must be 
absolutely rigid. The upright between 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PACE 225 



camera and title card holder should be 
sufficiently re-inforced to insure against 
any vibration. The titler illustrated in 
Fig. i may be used either vertically or 
horizontally. The arms to which lights 
arc attached can be locked securely at 
r.ny position by means of wing nuts. 

All animation, whether by pen and 
ink or by movement of individual let- 
ters, characters or figures, is done on 
the title board which becomes the ani- 



mating stage, the camera photographing 
eich step in single frame exposures. 

If we have overlooked describing oth- 
er innovations in title construction, it 
is likely they are relatively insignifi- 
cant. Those described here are among 
the most important for producing most 
of the popular cinematic effects in ti- 
tles. At least, if the amateur title maker 
will concentrate on these, he will have 
enough to keep him busy experimenting 
for some time to come. 



%Vild c^ife filming, . . . 



• Continued from Page 21} 

tified under the name of Tamias Stria- 
tus. In that woods he is insignificant, 
and (perhaps) unimportant in this 
world of vicious clashes and staggering 
events, but he literally pushed me into 
the lecture and writing field! 

One summer I had been testing the 
intelligence of my little furred friend 
with one problem after another, all of 
which involved the finding or obtain- 
ing of peanuts. No task seems too great 
tor him, if at the end of it he is reward- 
ed by a generous handful of this fa- 
vorite food! It was highly amusing to 
watch him. Nature has provided him 
with amazingly capacious cheeks, and 
it is not unusual for him to take three 
cr even four double peanuts in his 
mouth at one time, and race away to 
place them in his underground home! 

One day problems just rained on this 
little chipmunk. Movies were being 
taken of his antics, and therefore he 
had to work very hard for his proven- 
der. He had been in all my pockets, un- 
der my hat, inside my shirt, and up my 
tiouser legs in his untiring quest! He 
had entered a milk bottle where peanuts 
had been left for him, and after filling 
kis cheeks to capacity, had found his 
enlarged head would not pass through 
the narrow bottle neck. Reluctantly, 
after much futile scratching and push- 
ing, he removed the peanuts from his 
mouth and pushed them out one at a 
tjme with his nose. When they were all 
outside, he came out and carried them 
away in conventional chipmunk man- 
ner! All this made interesting filming, 
and the camera was working con- 
stantly. 

Next he was presented with a more 
complex problem. A rope was stretched 
taut between two trees about four feet 
from the ground. Peanuts were sus- 
pended from this rope by strings about 
two feet long. Thus the peanuts hung 
so the chipmunk could not reach them 
fiom above or below. I shall never for- 
get his deep concern over this problem! 
There hung what was to him the most 



desirable things in the world at that 
moment, his immediate food, and his 
provisions for the winter. Yet, he could 
not reach them. He looked longingly 
up at them, stretched as high as he 
could, jumped toward them, but to no 
avail! He studied the problem from sur- 
rounding trees and bushes, ran across 
the rope a number of times looking 
down at the dangling peanuts. And 
then an idea struck him! He acted sud- 
denly 3nd with decision. Out on the 
rope he went, unhesitatingly hung head 
downward from his hind feet and with 
his little front feet pulled up one of 
those strings hand over hand, until the 
peanut was in his anxious arms. He 
aiose to a sitting position on the rope, 
chewed the string in two releasing the 
peanut, and raced away triumphantly 
with his coveted prize. The problem 
never fooled him again. He could gath- 
er in those peanuts as fast as I could 
hang them up! 

But the camera was grinding all the 
while at an intimate distance, and that 
little fellow had given me a motion 
picture that proved to be invaluable, 
simple as it was. My film of chipmunk 
?ntics, recorded on black and white 
1 6mm. film, was shown before lecture 
audiences over much of America. Be- 
cause of it, I found myself established 
in the lecture field. That was eleven 
years ago. Since then I have given more 
than 3,600 lectures before schools, col- 
leges, clubs, and every manner of audi- 
ence. It is wonderful work and I am 
happy in it, but I never let myself for- 
get that a chipmunk opened the door 
for me. Yet, had I not previously learned 
to love that chipmunk, to appreciate 
his intelligence and want record of it, 
this film would not have been made! 

Since then, I have produced at least 
cne new 1,600 foot reel for lecture pur- 
poses each season. Now I work entirely 
in Kodachrome. Always I seek my cast 
from among the dwellers of the forest. 
Moose, deer, bears, beavers, wolves, coy- 
ates, foxes, raccoons, porcupines, birds, 
and many other creatures have loaned 



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PACE 226 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 




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me involuntarily their fine histrionic 
talent. Many of the little wild friends 
I cultivate right at my Sanctuary have 
helped enrich my scenes. Among these 
have been Inky my pet porcupine, Rack 
and Ruin my pet racoons, Sausage my 
ground-hog, Bunny Hunch and Big Boy 
my bear cubs, Bobette my fawn, and 
Halitosis my pet skunk! 

What methods are used in getting 
these pictures? Ah, there's the rub! it 
wild life photography were not so in- 
triguingly unconventional, the answer 
would be quick and simple. But then 
the whole experience would be sadly 
impoverished. Getting pictures of wild 
animals is the most challenging, defiant, 
provoking, and sometimes exasperating 
thing I have ever attempted — and there- 
fore it is the greatest sport I have ever 
known. I shall not soon forget the day 
1 stepped in a bumblebee's nest while 
endeavoring to creep within camera 
nmge of a bear, or the time I caught 
moose feeding in a Canadian swamp 
and took two hundred feet of him with 
the fade-out lever closed on my cam- 
era! I remember the blue heron that 
made me work three weeks for a picture 
that lasts ten seconds on the screen, 
«nd the beavers that took two years to 
film. A complete book could be written 
of the trials and tribulations native to 
this work — but that is what makes it 
interesting. It adds the challenge to it, 
and makes the scenes more precious 
when they are obtained. 

There is nothing teachable about it, 
ether than the simple camera technique 
of exposure and focus. These are parts 
of any photographic study, and imme- 
diately known to every beginner. No- 
where in the camera held is there call 
for more originality in planning and ap- 
proach, in methods and manners, than 
in dealing with those little furred and 
feathered fellows of the wilds — who 
hold not the slightest ambition for mov- 
ie careers! Generally they see no dif- 
ference between a camera and a gun, so 
long as either is in the hands of men 
fiom whom they have experienced so 
much adversity. They have no disposi- 
tion to cooperate, and they are governed 
by a certain uncanny intuition as to 
what they can do to spoil everything! 

For the most part, I gain my pictures 
bv hunting, just as I would with a rifle. 
I go out looking for my subjects, en- 
deavoring to outwit and outmaneuver 
them. This calls for much dawn and 
dusk work when light is uncertain. It 
demands locating remote rendezvous of 
the shy ones, and for patience, patience, 
and yet more patience! Much of the 
shooting is, per force, done free hand, 
or with the camera held against a tree, 
stump, or rock. My camera is the Cine 
Special, with turret mounting. Usually 
1 use the regular one inch f / 1 .9 and 
four and one-half inch f/4.5 lenses. 

A bit of home spun equipment gave 



me some interesting night pictures one 
year. We made a three foot square out 
of one inch iron pipe. This was mount- 
ed on an old, heavy tripod. Twelve au- 
tomobile spot lights were clamped to 
the square, and two six volt Hot Shot 
batteries wired to each light. The beams 
were arranged to converge at 3 5 feet. 
This equipment was placed in a flat bot- 
tomed boat, which is propelled by an 
electric outboard motor. The motor ran 
on a storage battery, and would take 
the boat along at about one mile an 
hour, in absolute silence. With this 
contrivance, my associate and I cruised 
the shores of a northern lake every rain- 
less night for an entire season. We saw 
many marvelous things, and photo- 
graphed a few of them. It was neces- 
sary for us to get within thirty-five feet 
cf an animal to have our lights effec- 
tive, but once there we could get quite 
satisfactory color pictures. Many fac- 
tors worked against us — the sudden loss 
of battery power, the difficulty of es- 
timating the distance accurately, the 
nervousness of animals — but by the end 
o r the season we had a good collection 
of pictures showing the beauty of night 
life in the forest. It was a homely stunt, 
but it worked! 

Of course, nature lore is not wholly 
animal life. While working at wild life 
photography, the beauty of our sur- 
roundings demands much of our atten- 
tion, and considerable of our film. The 
sunsets of the north are wonderful! I 
find lapse-time or single frame photog- 
raphy most satisfactory in recording 
them. Out in the woods this is done 
manually, of course. The interval be- 
tween the pictures depends on the speed 
cf the clouds, for if the clouds are made 
to race through the scene, the picture 
becomes novel rather than beautiful. 
But on average evenings, when the cus- 
tomary calm reigns and clouds are drift- 
ing slowly, a two-second interval is 
about right. 

It is not when you just want to catch 
a startling display of color that you 
diaw forth the best picture. It is when 
your thought reaches beyond the visible 
part of the display and feels the infinity 
of it all! It is when you recognize the 
power and peace, the rich stillness and 
grandeur, yes, the sacred meaning of 
these miracles which confront you, that 
you go searching for ways to catch these 
qualities on film. 

Such love of nature is not emotion- 
alism, but rather is the highest type of 
knowledge. It releases ideas, talents, and 
abilities which are otherwise dormant. 
Art, like charity, begins at home, in 
our own hearts, and the beauty we re- 
cord with pen, brush, or camera is ex- 
actly proportionate to our adoration and 
appreciation of the world we live in 
and the creatures with whom we share 
life. 



HOME MOVIES FOR JULY 



PAGE 227 



cAcce££ory, J£en£e£ • . . 



• Continued from Page 211 

ping down my camera lens diaphragm 
to the smallest possible f/ point, I se- 
cured some remarkably good telephoto 
shots. Of course, they were not to be 
compared to those filmed with a stand- 
ard telephoto lens, but for experimental 
purposes, they were altogether satis- 
factory. 

A simple filmviewer can be made 
utilizing one of the lenses mounted on 
an editing board as shown in diagram. 
Cut a circular hole, slightly smaller 
than diameter of lens, in a small square 
of plywood. Place lens over hole and 
cement in place with plastic wood. 
Drive four nails or wood screws up 
from bottom of editing board and into 
underside of lens block, as shown. Lens 
block should be positioned in exact cen- 
ter of film path, so that film will run 
beneath lens between the nail supports 
as it travels between the rewinds. 

Where a small room limits the size of 
picture that may be screened, the pic- 
ture can be projected larger by fitting 
one of the lenses inside a paper tube and 
fitting tube over projection lens, as il- 



lustrated in bottom diagram. Picture 
area and quality of projection will de- 
pend upon the auxiliary lens used. I 
used an 8 diopter lens with good results. 
Usually there is some loss of sharpness 
in the detail of picture projected at 
v/ider angles by this method, but where 
original image in film is good, a satis- 
factory projection will result. 

The mimeographed booklet which ac- 
companies the kit of lenses carries com- 
plete instructions from which the ex- 
perimenter may construct other acces- 
sories such as a telescope, Kodachrome 
slide viewer, steroscopic viewer, ground 
glass focusing magnifier, and a focusing 
dd for use with an enlarger in dark- 
room work. 

The movie amateur who is interested 
in optics as they apply to motion pic- 
tures, will gain a great deal through the 
many experiments that are possible with 
an assortment of lenses of this kind. 
Many, unable to buy a telephoto, a short 
focal length projection lens, filmviewer, 
etc., due to war conditions, can derive 
1 measure of good results from home 
made substitutes as suggested here. 



Review & 0/ cAmateur 3ilm& . . 



• Continued from Page 204 

producers' Movie of the Month, it is in- 
teresting to note how greatly their tech- 
nique improved in the latter picture. A 
little more time devoted to rehearsal, a 
little more care in the filming would 
make this victory garden picture a 
standout and qualify it for a 3 -Star in- 
stead of the 2-Star merit leader award- 
ed it. 

**Caught Short" is another adapta- 
tion of a continuity idea previously 
published in Home Movies. Running 
50 feet in 8mm. Kodachrome, it was 
produced by Mrs. Merle Williams of 
Los Angeles. 

Story concerns a husband and wife 
spending a day at the beach. Wife and 
husband are lounging under a beach 
umbrella, the wife knitting and the 
husband just relaxing — and ogling 
young girls as they pass. 

The husband falls asleep under the 
umbrella and the wife decides also to 
take a nap. But first she takes precau- 
tions against friend husband's flirta- 
tious inclinations — ties a cord about his 
leg and then to the umbrella. He awak- 
ens soon after his wife falls asleep and, 
wolf that he is, turns on the charm 



for the many young girls parading the 
beach or sunning themselves near by. 

He is not long getting response. A 
beauty, clad in a tight fitting suit, re- 
turns the flirtation, beckons him to 
follow her. He rises, but after going 
a few paces, is suddenly jerked off his 
feet by the rope ingeniously tethering 
him to the umbrella. The flirtatious 
maiden laughs at his predicament and 
skips off down the beach while the wife 
pulls on the rope to bring the shame- 
faced husband back under the um- 
brella. 

Mrs. Williams has done a good all- 
aiound job with this picture. Photog- 
raphy, editing and titling all are good. 
A little more rehearsal with the cast 
vould have netted better response and 
tightened up the action to make the 
picture even more humorous. The flir- 
tatious bathing girl should have been 
coached in a more subtle type of flir- 
tation — there's too much, long-drawn- 
out hand waving. The "husband" in 
the cast was well suited to the part and 
a little more rehearsal would have made 
his a stand-out performance. 

The picture has been awarded a 2- 
Star merit leader. 



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